Society/Culture Teacher Stood Down For Restraining Boy In School Brawl

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Goosecat

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Thread starter #27
He has been reinstated and is back at work today. Police and the Ed Dept have wrapped up their investigations and taken no further action.

All's well that ends well.
Good to see there is still some members of society supporting our teachers. The doting and empowered mother has removed her cute little darling form the school due to pressure from other parents as well apparently.
 
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#32
What are peoples opinions regarding this example of our society/culture?
How do people feel about a group of teens brawling at school, telling a teacher stuck with trying to break it up to F*** Off and the response from that child's obviously doting mother?
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-05...r-stood-down-after-school-yard-brawl/11111450
I have stuck strictly to posing questions and seeking opinions of others as Malifice and I guess by extension Chief nowadays apparently, have directed.
It’s interesting that the media claimed the boy tackled to the ground was only watching the fight.

They fail to mention or show the footage of the boy raising his fists to the teacher, leading up to the tackle.


The mum of the kid then has the balsa to say “no one should touch my kid”. By the look of her, she should have put down the bottle decades ago.

Peasants parents = kid has no hope
 
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#33
But do agree with others that teachers, nurses, social, police, ambos, fireys etc all don’t get paid enough due to much worse instances than this.
What are those people who have bullets and grenades and stuff coming at them? Will come to me. Will get back to ya.
 
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I am on my final teaching placement right now. In one of the last uni classes before it, they talked about behaviour management strategies and what to do if kids are physically fighting. I was quite surprised at how unwilling both the lecturer and the other students were to suggest that teachers should intervene. They weren't saying "We have to stay out of it", but they tap-danced around the issue and were sure to throw in many caveats about being careful of touching kids because it could get you in trouble, and that you don't want to get hurt yourself ("What if they swing at you?") etc.

My suggestion was that pussyfooting around when kids are hurting each other was ridiculous. Being about 194cm and a tick under 100kg, I am lucky to have my own safety pretty low on the priority list since I can take care of myself, and I understand when younger, smaller females are hesitant to get involved (obviously). But teachers are responsible for the welfare and safety of students at the school, and we have no choice but to step in and stop kids fighting if they don't respond to verbal commands. What's a teacher to do otherwise? Look a parent in the eye and say "Yeah look I am sorry your beloved little Johnny has a broken face right now, but you know, I didn't want to inappropriately touch the kids or risk a boo-boo of my own to protect him." The parent would rightly be filthy.
 

Goosecat

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I am on my final teaching placement right now. In one of the last uni classes before it, they talked about behaviour management strategies and what to do if kids are physically fighting. I was quite surprised at how unwilling both the lecturer and the other students were to suggest that teachers should intervene. They weren't saying "We have to stay out of it", but they tap-danced around the issue and were sure to throw in many caveats about being careful of touching kids because it could get you in trouble, and that you don't want to get hurt yourself ("What if they swing at you?") etc.

My suggestion was that pussyfooting around when kids are hurting each other was ridiculous. Being about 194cm and a tick under 100kg, I am lucky to have my own safety pretty low on the priority list since I can take care of myself, and I understand when younger, smaller females are hesitant to get involved (obviously). But teachers are responsible for the welfare and safety of students at the school, and we have no choice but to step in and stop kids fighting if they don't respond to verbal commands. What's a teacher to do otherwise? Look a parent in the eye and say "Yeah look I am sorry your beloved little Johnny has a broken face right now, but you know, I didn't want to inappropriately touch the kids or risk a boo-boo of my own to protect him." The parent would rightly be filthy.
My niece has just started her first full contract and decided to go for 3 years out "woop woop" where every child is indigenous. This state has a program to get teachers out there by offering new grads a school of choice offer once back in Metro if they commit to a three year out "the sticks" contract first.
I've not gone into full training details with her but these first term holidays she came back to catch up and I recall one description.

It involved violence, kid going through window, severing tendons and ambulance attendance.
Her instructions are to not get involved and to go and get a MALE teacher to deal with and take on associated risk. Of course we all know males and females are equal and interchangeable in all aspects nowadays, so let's not bother going through the whole equal pay for equal work implications. Rest assured however, when this stuff happens it will be males like you and you alone taking on any risk. The other 90% of your peers will be watching the assault happen, that is the new enlightened/feminised model. Observe, ask them to stop and take mental notes for report, is the direction basically.

Mark my words at some stage a kid is going to get punched and killed at school whilst a teacher is staying out of the conflict zone and following directions to not get physically involved. It's going to happen, it's just a question of whether it will be your child or someone else's.
 
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#37
I am on my final teaching placement right now. In one of the last uni classes before it, they talked about behaviour management strategies and what to do if kids are physically fighting. I was quite surprised at how unwilling both the lecturer and the other students were to suggest that teachers should intervene. They weren't saying "We have to stay out of it", but they tap-danced around the issue and were sure to throw in many caveats about being careful of touching kids because it could get you in trouble, and that you don't want to get hurt yourself ("What if they swing at you?") etc.

My suggestion was that pussyfooting around when kids are hurting each other was ridiculous. Being about 194cm and a tick under 100kg, I am lucky to have my own safety pretty low on the priority list since I can take care of myself, and I understand when younger, smaller females are hesitant to get involved (obviously). But teachers are responsible for the welfare and safety of students at the school, and we have no choice but to step in and stop kids fighting if they don't respond to verbal commands. What's a teacher to do otherwise? Look a parent in the eye and say "Yeah look I am sorry your beloved little Johnny has a broken face right now, but you know, I didn't want to inappropriately touch the kids or risk a boo-boo of my own to protect him." The parent would rightly be filthy.
Most people would expect teachers to prevent any fight from processing or escalating.
What’s your opinion on the amount of force used in this instance ?
 
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Moderator #38
Most people would expect teachers to prevent any fight from processing or escalating.
What’s your opinion on the amount of force used in this instance ?
Not sure why he was seemingly holding him down like that and then simply letting go. All a bit weird. Hard to say anything without a longer clip to give some context, and I only watched it once.

Basically, if you use the minimum amount of force necessary to control the kid until they aren't being dangerous anymore, you're fine. Too much force or physically restraining them far longer than necessary is not good. Common sense applies, but it's not always easy to use it in a highly charged situation when you aren't trained to. Hell, even when you're trained to people make mistakes.
 
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#39
I am on my final teaching placement right now. In one of the last uni classes before it, they talked about behaviour management strategies and what to do if kids are physically fighting. I was quite surprised at how unwilling both the lecturer and the other students were to suggest that teachers should intervene. They weren't saying "We have to stay out of it", but they tap-danced around the issue and were sure to throw in many caveats about being careful of touching kids because it could get you in trouble, and that you don't want to get hurt yourself ("What if they swing at you?") etc.

My suggestion was that pussyfooting around when kids are hurting each other was ridiculous. Being about 194cm and a tick under 100kg, I am lucky to have my own safety pretty low on the priority list since I can take care of myself, and I understand when younger, smaller females are hesitant to get involved (obviously). But teachers are responsible for the welfare and safety of students at the school, and we have no choice but to step in and stop kids fighting if they don't respond to verbal commands. What's a teacher to do otherwise? Look a parent in the eye and say "Yeah look I am sorry your beloved little Johnny has a broken face right now, but you know, I didn't want to inappropriately touch the kids or risk a boo-boo of my own to protect him." The parent would rightly be filthy.
Spot on mate. There was a fight in a classroom I was in a couple of months ago. You need to make a split second decision, the main thing in your head is the absolute safety of the students. You are on a hiding to nothing. You can stand back and let it happen by or you do what you think is right. Either way, you are still going to cop flack from someone. I managed to separate the students by putting my arm around the enforcers waist and pulling him away. Fortunately, he was only of slim weight and average height. No one was hurt. I was called into the Principals office and she was fine with what I did, but also spoke to me about getting in a situation which could damage my career. The main thing is to use restraint that is reasonable given the situation. You are no under no obligation to restrain anyone, however. You can stand back and watch someone punch the **** out of someone and try to talk them out of it and your job will still be there. I stopped a few fights in the East Kimberley when I was teaching in remote areas. A few of the parents thanked me for keeping their child safe. On one occasion, one of the parents came at me with a knife for putting my hands on his son. I would do the same thing every time though, if I see danger to students safety, my heart says to stop it, if it means restraining someone than so be it. Good luck with your teaching career.
 
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