Society/Culture The Grievance Studies Hoax - 'Applied Postmodernism' in Scholarship and Higher Education

CM86

Anindilyakwa
Sep 21, 2009
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Ummm, “cultural learning” courses about “race, (white) privilege and decolonisation”, are indoctrination courses.

Australia was always going to be conquered and colonised. Or do people think this continent would have been a fallow wildlife reserve while the rest of the world was putting men on the moon?
I mean, we can still respect their culture and history can't we?

What, who and how is it indoctrinating?
 

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CM86

Anindilyakwa
Sep 21, 2009
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What does “white privilege” have to do with culture and history of indigenous people?
I think explaining the concept of 'white privilege' would help some people better understand some Indigenous communities, and the difficulties many Indigenous people still face.

Even with the quota systems and everything else in place that riles up certain factions, there is still a large gap.
I think it helps. From my perspective, I support it.
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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I think explaining the concept of 'white privilege' would help some people better understand some Indigenous communities, and the difficulties many Indigenous people still face.

Even with the quota systems and everything else in place that riles up certain factions, there is still a large gap.
I think it helps. From my perspective, I support it.
How is this white privilege? Are non-white, non-indigenous students not privileged. What does this mean to the large student body of Chinese nationals?

Of course you support it. You are indoctrinated.
 

Soft Downhill Skier

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What's the problem?
How is this white privilege? Are non-white, non-indigenous students not privileged. What does this mean to the large student body of Chinese nationals?

Of course you support it. You are indoctrinated.
Again, all your Joe Rogan podcasts from Weinstein and Peterson cherish academic enquiry.

What is the harm in listening to a different perspective? Ive heard it, and picked and chosen what I believe has some merit, and what is bulls**t.
 

CM86

Anindilyakwa
Sep 21, 2009
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How is this white privilege? Are non-white, non-indigenous students not privileged. What does this mean to the large student body of Chinese nationals?

Of course you support it. You are indoctrinated.
I think it's a good idea. Can someone let me know what's so bad about it?

I'd love to break free of this "indoctrination".
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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What's the problem?

Again, all your Joe Rogan podcasts from Weinstein and Peterson cherish academic enquiry.

What is the harm in listening to a different perspective? Ive heard it, and picked and chosen what I believe has some merit, and what is bulls**t.
I don’t listen to Joe Rogan.

When these things become required training for career development it is not “academic enquiry”.
 

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ShanDog

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If it's done properly.

There are entire histories of Indigenous people slowly disappearing forever because the stories are no longer being passed down from generation to generation.

Kids are no longer interested.

I'm OK with more Indigenous knowledge being shared at University.

Is your concern that it's all just for show? Pretence that we view the Indigenous as our equals in society?
We definitely need to re-examine what we know about indigenous history - it's been largely ignored or written out of the history books thanks to the views of the time when Australia was colonised. No argument from me when it comes to improving and sharing our knowledge of that in schools and universities.

However, there's a lot mentioned in that article that shows they aren't doing things properly. A focus on white privilege (an overextended, unsound and corrupted concept), the unconscious bias training (a thoroughly useless and even harmful piece of pseudoscience that the idea originators are distancing themselves from) are good examples for starters.

De-colonisation theories are extremely dubious in scope and application (IMO) and mixing indigenous science with modern science sounds like an epistemological dumpster fire in the making. But sure, I'm all for academic heterodoxy so best of luck to them in that area. Hopefully no bad ideas like those I mentioned before come out of that and become part of the curriculum though...
 

Soft Downhill Skier

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...(IMO) and mixing indigenous science with modern science sounds like an epistemological dumpster fire in the making.
Yep, that got me wondering also. But that could be my lack of knowledge about Indigenous science showing through. Or lack of knowledge about any science.

University staff deal with young adults. Many of whom struggle when adapting to university. A critical understanding of how they function relative to those from different circumstances can be a great thing. The spirtuality rainbow serpent stuff is a waste of time IMO, but an analysis of how different students perceive of how power structures can be really useful.
 

CM86

Anindilyakwa
Sep 21, 2009
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Why must someone in the physics or maths department be urged to take these courses?
To show support for possible future Indigenous co-workers/students? I don't know.

I'm more in support of Universities having the option to learn and keep record of Indigenous history. And to employ Indigenous people. And to show our society that we consider them equals.

It could all be an exercise in virtue signalling. But I think it's sending the right message for the right reasons.

What's the worst that could possibly come of this? Because I think it could be pretty good in some areas.

We definitely need to re-examine what we know about indigenous history - it's been largely ignored or written out of the history books thanks to the views of the time when Australia was colonised. No argument from me when it comes to improving and sharing our knowledge of that in schools and universities.
Excellent, that's what I took from the article.

However, there's a lot mentioned in that article that shows they aren't doing things properly. A focus on white privilege (an overextended, unsound and corrupted concept)
I don't think it's a focus on white privilege.
And it would depend on how it was discussed.

I believe that I have had advantages in my life, that many Indigenous people have not. So my understanding of 'white privilege' is based on that.
What's the corrupted concept, and who teaches it?

the unconscious bias training (a thoroughly useless and even harmful piece of pseudoscience that the idea originators are distancing themselves from)
What is that, and who is distancing themselves from it? Have they said why?

Unconscious bias, to me, sounds like a human condition.
I've seen people not even look through a resume after seeing a strange name. I've seen people openly talk about avoiding hiring Indigenous, because they are "lazy and unreliable".

Is unconscious bias connected to sterotypes or something like that?

De-colonisation theories are extremely dubious in scope and application (IMO) and mixing indigenous science with modern science sounds like an epistemological dumpster fire in the making. But sure, I'm all for academic heterodoxy so best of luck to them in that area. Hopefully no bad ideas like those I mentioned before come out of that and become part of the curriculum though...
If it can be done, I'd love to see it.
From my limited understanding of Indigenous science, I'd struggle to really seem them as equal. But I've never had the opportunity to learn more about it.

How much do you know about Indigenous science? Do we know it isn't compatible?


Again, if it's done well I believe this could be pretty good.

Everything always has 'worst case scenarios'. But do we have to jump at them?
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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Unconscious bias, to me, sounds like a human condition.
I've seen people not even look through a resume after seeing a strange name. I've seen people openly talk about avoiding hiring Indigenous, because they are "lazy and unreliable".

Is unconscious bias connected to sterotypes or something like that?
Implicit/unconscious bias has been shown to be rubbish, does not replicate, does not clear the bar being scientifically rigourous. It’s nonsense.
 

Soft Downhill Skier

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It's not a question you can possibly answer. And it's a pretty strange path to lead you on.
Yep. It's still publish or perish. And numerous other criteria that would influence personnel decisions. I'd be very surprised if one decision was made based on attendance at these.
 
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