Resource The NMFC History thread

Snake_Baker

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Pfffft, as if!
Based on Gordon, the Tinsmith Umpire, and his own mother's evidence, Fred was a bit stiff to get found guilty, i wonder if the bench were Geelong residents too.
I don't reckon "The Tinsmith" would have hung around Kensington for too much longer.
 

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kangaroo7

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THE 1927 "TALL POPPIES"

After failing to win a match in 1926 (a draw with Hawthorn was all they could manage), the North executive decided that the side was far too light. More height and weight were needed. Several players over 6' were recruited. Club legend Syd Barker had returned from Essendon to captain/coach the side. He was rather a big man himself. With him,also returning from Essendon,was ex-North forward Tom Jenkins, not that tall but built like a barrel. These two were well into the twilight of their careers and would end up playing only 12 games between them. North also acquired former Collingwood champion Charles Tyson. Tyson had been accused of "playing dead" in the 1926 Grand Final,which Collingwood easily lost to Melbourne, and quickly snapped up North's offer after being de-listed by the Magpies.

With such a plethora of big men North were dubbed by the media as the "Tall Poppies", although it was never an official nickname. A Herald reader wrote to the paper warning that the club should be teaching the players the finer points of the game rather than concentrating on size. A 'mosquito fleet' team could cause them problems. The season began well with wins over Fitzroy and Essendon. They then went down narrowly to Geelong by two points after a shot for goal by Metcalfe after the bell was carried away by the strong breeze. The following week they kicked a then record score against Hawthorn. At this stage North were top of the table and had the public taking notice. But, sadly, there the success ended. Four heavy losses followed, and, although they made a game of it in some later matches, there would be no further wins and the club would finish 11th, only above Hawthorn, who had their only win of the season at North's expense.

05 06 (Herald) Cartoon.jpg


This cartoon appeared in the Herald the day before the Round 2 match against Essendon, which North won.Barker and Tyson were both firemen and the club leaders.


05 20 (Herald) The Tall Poppies.jpg



The players in this picture were from left: Joe Lovett, Tyson, Bill Conroy, Don Watson, Tom Jenkins, Fred Coulsell, Arthur ("Max") Pitchford, John Lewis, Alby ("Curley") Linton and Bill Lynch. Club secretary Stan Thomas is bottom left. Of them all only Lovett, Tyson, Watson,Pitchford, Lewis and Lynch made any real impact that season. Coulsell played only one match and Conroy none. By the end of the season Coulsell, Conroy, Barker, Jenkins had all retired or moved on. Watson remained for a further two seasons but played only five further matches. Lynch played until 1929 for 36 games and 43 goals. Linton, a great centreman who had been with the club in its VFA days was in dispute with it for most of the year and did not train, managing only three matches. He was expelled from the club for striking an official after the club refused him a clearance.Lewis was given a twelve month suspension at the end of the season for assaulting a Richmond player outside the MCG after the first semi-final and so was also absent for 1928.

So ended a season that started so hopefully and ended so dismally. The "Tall Poppies" were indeed cut down to size.
 
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muttley45

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THE 1927 "TALL POPPIES"

After failing to win a match in 1926 (a draw with Hawthorn was all they could manage), the North executive decided that the side was far too light. More height and weight were needed. Several players over 6' were recruited. Club legend Syd Barker had returned from Essendon to captain/coach the side. He was rather a big man himself. With him,also returning from Essendon,was ex-North forward Tom Jenkins, not that tall but built like a barrel. These two were well into the twilight of their careers and would end up playing only 12 games between them. North also acquired former Collingwood champion Charles Tyson. Tyson had been accused of "playing dead" in the 1926 Grand Final,which Collingwood easily lost to Melbourne, and quickly snapped up North's offer after being de-listed by the Magpies.

With such a plethora of big men North were dubbed by the media as the "Tall Poppies", although it was never an official nickname. A Herald reader wrote to the paper warning that the club should be teaching the players the finer points of the game rather than concentrating on size. A 'mosquito fleet' team could cause them problems. The season began well with wins over Fitzroy and Essendon. They then went down narrowly to Geelong by two points after a shot for goal by Metcalfe after the bell was carried away by the strong breeze. The following week they kicked a then record score against Hawthorn. At this stage North were top of the table and had the public taking notice. But, sadly, there the success ended. Four heavy losses followed, and, although they made a game of it in some later matches, there would be no further wins and the club would finish 11th, only above Hawthorn, who had their only win of the season at North's expense.

View attachment 543217

This cartoon appeared in the Herald the day before the Round 2 match against Essendon, which North won.Barker and Tyson were both firemen and the club leaders.


View attachment 543218


The players in this picture were from left: Joe Lovett, Tyson, Bill Conroy, Don Watson, Tom Jenkins, Fred Coulsell, Arthur ("Max") Pitchford, John Lewis, Alby ("Curley") Linton and Bill Lynch. Club secretary Stan Thomas is bottom left. Of them all only Lovett, Tyson, Watson,Pitchford, Lewis and Lynch made any real impact that season. Coulsell played only one match and Conroy none. By the end of the season Coulsell, Conroy, Barker, Jenkins had all retired or moved on. Watson remained for a further two seasons but played only five further matches. Lynch played until 1929 for 36 games and 43 goals. Linton, a great centreman who had been with the club in its VFA days was in dispute with it for most of the year and did not train, managing only three matches. He was expelled from the club for striking an official after the club refused him a clearance.Lewis was given a twelve month suspension at the end of the season for assaulting a Richmond player outside the MCG after the first semi-final and so was also absent for 1928.

So ended a season that started so hopefully and ended so dismally. The "Tall Poppies" were indeed cut down to size.
Tommy Jenkins keen fisherman ? :p
 
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Going through old boxes of my dad I have had for 20 years and found old North newspapers and footy records and weg posters from the 70’s . Found this gem in the 1975 annual report. My dad got all the signatures of the 75 premiership team except Kekovich. Must have went when they took the photo as we all know keka didn’t show up.
Have spent all day reading the old papers.
 

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gokangas

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Going through old boxes of my dad I have had for 20 years and found old North newspapers and footy records and weg posters from the 70’s . Found this gem in the 1975 annual report. My dad got all the signatures of the 75 premiership team except Kekovich. Must have went when they took the photo as we all know keka didn’t show up.
Have spent all day reading the old papers.
Great stuff to have. Golden era for us older Kangas.
 

kangaroo7

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1910 ----STATE OF THE ART FACILITIES.


The North Melbourne Courier & West Melbourne Advertiser newspaper issue of 17 June 1910 gushed over the new improvements at Arden Street:

"The long looked for and much required dressing and training rooms in connection with the North Melbourne ground will be opened and used for the first time tomorrow afternoon, when the annual inter-state match takes place. Two commodious rooms, 24 ft x 11 ft each, with bath-rooms and lavatories (about 11ft x 11ft) attached to each room, have been erected under the grand stand. One is for the use of the home team and the other is for the visitors. The rooms are well lighted by three large windows in each, and there are entrances from both front and rear of grand stand. Each room will be lit by electricity, which will be a decided improvement and not so dangerous as the old kerosene lamps at present in use in the pavilion, and undoubtedly cleaner. The rooms no doubt when finally completed will be equal to any of a similar kind on any metropolitan ground. Credit is due to Cr J H Gardiner for the interest he has taken generally in the improvements, and especially for the prompt manner in which he brought about the sewering operations, which were carried out with unusual celerity.
The matter of lockers has been overlooked, considering the amount of waste space that has been boarded in. However this can be rectified at any time later on when necessary, at a small expense."

The facilities were used for the first time the next day--Saturday 18 June, when the VFA team met South Australia. North players Hardy, Caine,Hammond were selected in the Victorian team which was victorious by 12 points.

If this was the ground used by the VFA for all finals matches and interstate matches, one shudders to think how primitive some of the other club's ovals were.
 
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blackshadow

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1910 ----STATE OF THE ART FACILITIES.


The North Melbourne Courier & West Melbourne Advertiser newspaper issue of 17 June 1910 gushed over the new improvements at Arden Street:

"The long looked for and much required dressing and training rooms in connection with the North Melbourne groung will be opened and used for the first time tomorrow afternoon, when the annual inter-state match takes place. Two commodious rooms, 24 ft x 11 ft each, with bath-rooms and lavatories (about 11ft x 11ft) attached to each room, have been erected under the grand stand. One is for the use of the home team and the other is for the visitors. The rooms are well lighted by three large windows in each, and there are entrances from both front and rear of grand stand. Each room will be lit by electricity, which will be a decided improvement and not so dangerous as the old kerosene lamps at present in use in the pavilion, and undoubtedly cleaner. The rooms no doubt when finally completed will be equal to any of a similar kind on any metropolitan ground. Credit is due to Cr J H Gardiner for the interest he has taken generally in the improvements, and especially for the prompt manner in which he brought about the sewering operations, which were carried out with unusual celerity.
The matter of lockers has been overlooked, condidering the amount of waste space that has been boarded in. However this can be rectified at any time later on when necessary, at a small expense."

The facilities were used for the first time the next day--Saturday 18 June, when the VFA team met South Australia. North players Hardy, Caine,Hammond were selected in the Victorian team which was victorious by 12 points.

If this was the ground used by the VFA for all finals matches and interstate matches, one shudders to think how primitive some of the other club's ovals were.
I do love a commodious room!
 

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red+black

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giantroo

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https://www.mailtimes.com.au/story/...urnes-golden-era-legends-of-yesterday/?cs=226

OCTOBER 30 2018 - 2:00PM
Craig Sholl part of North Melbourne’s golden era | Legends of Yesterday



Craig Sholl

A NORTH Melbourne best and fairest winner and duel premiership player, Craig Sholl grew up spending most of his time playing cricket.


Born in Manangatang in the state’s north-west, Sholl’s family bought a motel and moved to Horsham when he was 13.

“I played under-16s in Manangatang – there’s an old famous saying that you wouldn’t get a game in the Manangatang thirds,” he said.

“My junior club was the Horsham Tigers and I think we won a flag or two. From there I played one year in the reserves with the Horsham Demons.”

Sholl spent most of his time as a junior athlete playing cricket. He would play juniors in the morning and A Grade in the afternoon.

“I was just cricket mad,” he said. “It was great fun playing both juniors and A Grade. I remember Horsham as a great country town and I have a lot of great mates from there that I still keep in touch with.”

At 17, Sholl played a single year in the reserves for the Horsham Demons, losing in a grand final at Dimboola.

The next day he went to Murtoa to play in front of North Melbourne scouts.

“Somehow after that grand final, the next day I went to Murtoa with a North Melbourne squad,” he said.

“I didn’t actually play that day – there were two blokes that didn’t play, myself and Wayne Schwass.”

Read more: Adrian Hickmott eyes off lengthy coaching career | Legends of Yesterday

Both Schwass and Sholl went onto play more than 200 games for North Melbourne. Sholl’s brother Brad also made it to the AFL, playing 171 games for North Melbourne and Geelong.

“I don’t know what happened because I can’t remember even getting a kick in that grand final,” Sholl said.

“I did manage to win the reserves best and fairest at 17. I was a second-year panel-beater at the time and I had to tell my boss I would be moving to Melbourne to play for North Melbourne the next year. That was never in my sights. I always wanted to play league footy but I never thought I was good enough.”


Craig Sholl played 235 games for North Melbourne.


Sholl went to North Melbourne during a time where the club invested heavily in country football products.

“We got dropped off at a house in Essendon with a few other blokes and you start training,” he said.

“There were 250 people there and they really started to cull them quickly. After a few weeks there were 40 of us left. It started to get serious from there. It was pretty savage then, it was just before the draft.

“I was in Essendon’s zone so as soon as they heard North Melbourne had their eye on me, they whacked me on their list. North paid about $20,000 to Essendon for me to go across. I didn’t know that till later on in my career.

“All of a sudden I was in North’s under-19s and played about 10 reserves games. Two years later I played senior footy.”

Despite coming from country Victoria, Sholl said he enjoyed the switch, helped by the fact he was surrounded by other young players from a similar background.

“I was lucky to see the real bad at the club and then the really good results,” he said.

“When I first walked into the social club people would be throwing memberships away. Then came the country kids – North made a pact they would recruit country kids.

“We had the likes of the older guys like Alistair Clarkson and then in came John Longmire, Wayne Carey, Glenn Archer, Anthony Stevens, and they turned the whole thing around.

“Back in our day the North boys were so close and that’s because there were so many country kids. We were like brothers, lived in each other’s houses and it was like being at a country footy club.”

Related: Shayne Breuer took his opportunities | Legends of Yesterday

Sholl made his senior debut for North Melbourne in 1987. He played four games that year, none the next, and four games in 1989 before becoming a regular starter for the side.

“I was told the first year I played senior football I would get four games, regardless of how I played,” he said. “I got a few kicks in a couple of the games but I struggled for a bit. I went missing for a while.

“John Kennedy was my first coach and then Wayne Schimmelbusch coached and he gave me a few games.”


Craig Sholl fails to mark over Guy McKenna of West Coast.


After playing 13 senior games in 1990, Sholl’s breakout season came in 1991 when he won the best and fairest. North Melbourne finished eighth, with the top six sides playing finals.

“The best and fairest was by far up there with the best of things I did,” he said.

“In a side that strong, you do learn to play for the team and not yourself. Along the way you get a couple of little accolades and you just have to grab them.”

When Dennis Pagan took over the coaching role at North Melbourne in 1993, things started to click for the side.

The players started to focus on football as almost a full-time role, giving up their other jobs.

“We had to work at that stage. When Dennis Pagan first got there we all had to have jobs,” Sholl said.

“Half way through Dennis’ career he changed and we didn’t have to work. He wasn’t keen on that but he realised that’s the way football was going.

“We worked with the Australian Institute of Sport and they would pop up and get us to do a swimming session for an hour, or training during the day. That started to happen in 1995 where we would start training in the morning too.

“It wasn't full-time like it is now. We would start training at 10am and would be home by 1pm. Now they get there at 8am and leave at 7pm.”

The results started to flow for North Melbourne, with the side making preliminary finals in 1994 and 1995 but losing to Geelong and Carlton respectively.

Read more: Bob Skilton inspired Rupanyup’s John Sudholz | Legends of Yesterday

The breakthrough premiership win came in 1996.

North finished second on the ladder behind Sydney by just two points, beating Geelong and Brisbane in finals to set up a grand final against Sydney.

In front of more than 93,000 people, North defeated Sydney 19.17 (131) to 13.10 (88) at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

“Because we had played in preliminary finals but hadn’t got there so 1996 was by far the best,” Sholl said.

North made the preliminary final again in 1997 before losing to Adelaide in the 1998 grand final.

Sholl played in his second premiership in 1999, in a win against Carlton.

“Then again in 1999, it was a different feeling because you realise how hard they are to get in it and to win one,” he said.

“We lost in 1998 and you would rather not play in one.

“We played Anthony Stevens with a broken leg in 1999. On the Thursday night he needled himself up that much he got through training. He had 10 kicks in the first quarter of the grand final and his leg just snapped.

“The crowds were just huge. In 1999 we were lucky in the last quarter to be up a bit so we could enjoy the game."


Craig Sholl is chaired off after the preliminary final in 2000 against Melbourne.


Among his teammates, Sholl said Wayne Carey stuck out as the best.

“It was just amazing some of the guys I got to play with. Carey is by far the best. He was an absolute freak and he worked so hard off the track,” he said.

Sholl said Pagan was a tough coach.

“Dennis was a very hard man. He is a genuine person and he could get the best out of people,” he said.

“He coached us in under-19s and then he was lucky enough to get the job in 1993. We just thought that was what you had to put up with to play league footy. His methods just didn’t work at Carlton.”

After his playing career, Sholl and his family moved to Echuca where he continued to play football before hanging up the boots for good.

He now runs a caravan park in Bright and said he had loved returning to the country way of living.
 
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Luke72

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https://www.mailtimes.com.au/story/...urnes-golden-era-legends-of-yesterday/?cs=226

OCTOBER 30 2018 - 2:00PM
Craig Sholl part of North Melbourne’s golden era | Legends of Yesterday



Craig Sholl

A NORTH Melbourne best and fairest winner and duel premiership player, Craig Sholl grew up spending most of his time playing cricket.


Born in Manangatang in the state’s north-west, Sholl’s family bought a motel and moved to Horsham when he was 13.

“I played under-16s in Manangatang – there’s an old famous saying that you wouldn’t get a game in the Manangatang thirds,” he said.

“My junior club was the Horsham Tigers and I think we won a flag or two. From there I played one year in the reserves with the Horsham Demons.”

Sholl spent most of his time as a junior athlete playing cricket. He would play juniors in the morning and A Grade in the afternoon.

“I was just cricket mad,” he said. “It was great fun playing both juniors and A Grade. I remember Horsham as a great country town and I have a lot of great mates from there that I still keep in touch with.”

At 17, Sholl played a single year in the reserves for the Horsham Demons, losing in a grand final at Dimboola.

The next day he went to Murtoa to play in front of North Melbourne scouts.

“Somehow after that grand final, the next day I went to Murtoa with a North Melbourne squad,” he said.

“I didn’t actually play that day – there were two blokes that didn’t play, myself and Wayne Schwass.”

Read more: Adrian Hickmott eyes off lengthy coaching career | Legends of Yesterday

Both Schwass and Sholl went onto play more than 200 games for North Melbourne. Sholl’s brother Brad also made it to the AFL, playing 171 games for North Melbourne and Geelong.

“I don’t know what happened because I can’t remember even getting a kick in that grand final,” Sholl said.

“I did manage to win the reserves best and fairest at 17. I was a second-year panel-beater at the time and I had to tell my boss I would be moving to Melbourne to play for North Melbourne the next year. That was never in my sights. I always wanted to play league footy but I never thought I was good enough.”


Craig Sholl played 235 games for North Melbourne.


Sholl went to North Melbourne during a time where the club invested heavily in country football products.

“We got dropped off at a house in Essendon with a few other blokes and you start training,” he said.

“There were 250 people there and they really started to cull them quickly. After a few weeks there were 40 of us left. It started to get serious from there. It was pretty savage then, it was just before the draft.

“I was in Essendon’s zone so as soon as they heard North Melbourne had their eye on me, they whacked me on their list. North paid about $20,000 to Essendon for me to go across. I didn’t know that till later on in my career.

“All of a sudden I was in North’s under-19s and played about 10 reserves games. Two years later I played senior footy.”

Despite coming from country Victoria, Sholl said he enjoyed the switch, helped by the fact he was surrounded by other young players from a similar background.

“I was lucky to see the real bad at the club and then the really good results,” he said.

“When I first walked into the social club people would be throwing memberships away. Then came the country kids – North made a pact they would recruit country kids.

“We had the likes of the older guys like Alistair Clarkson and then in came John Longmire, Wayne Carey, Glenn Archer, Anthony Stevens, and they turned the whole thing around.

“Back in our day the North boys were so close and that’s because there were so many country kids. We were like brothers, lived in each other’s houses and it was like being at a country footy club.”

Related: Shayne Breuer took his opportunities | Legends of Yesterday

Sholl made his senior debut for North Melbourne in 1987. He played four games that year, none the next, and four games in 1989 before becoming a regular starter for the side.

“I was told the first year I played senior football I would get four games, regardless of how I played,” he said. “I got a few kicks in a couple of the games but I struggled for a bit. I went missing for a while.

“John Kennedy was my first coach and then Wayne Schimmelbusch coached and he gave me a few games.”


Craig Sholl fails to mark over Guy McKenna of West Coast.


After playing 13 senior games in 1990, Sholl’s breakout season came in 1991 when he won the best and fairest. North Melbourne finished eighth, with the top six sides playing finals.

“The best and fairest was by far up there with the best of things I did,” he said.

“In a side that strong, you do learn to play for the team and not yourself. Along the way you get a couple of little accolades and you just have to grab them.”

When Dennis Pagan took over the coaching role at North Melbourne in 1993, things started to click for the side.

The players started to focus on football as almost a full-time role, giving up their other jobs.

“We had to work at that stage. When Dennis Pagan first got there we all had to have jobs,” Sholl said.

“Half way through Dennis’ career he changed and we didn’t have to work. He wasn’t keen on that but he realised that’s the way football was going.

“We worked with the Australian Institute of Sport and they would pop up and get us to do a swimming session for an hour, or training during the day. That started to happen in 1995 where we would start training in the morning too.

“It wasn't full-time like it is now. We would start training at 10am and would be home by 1pm. Now they get there at 8am and leave at 7pm.”

The results started to flow for North Melbourne, with the side making preliminary finals in 1994 and 1995 but losing to Geelong and Carlton respectively.

Read more: Bob Skilton inspired Rupanyup’s John Sudholz | Legends of Yesterday

The breakthrough premiership win came in 1996.

North finished second on the ladder behind Sydney by just two points, beating Geelong and Brisbane in finals to set up a grand final against Sydney.

In front of more than 93,000 people, North defeated Sydney 19.17 (131) to 13.10 (88) at the Melbourne Cricket Ground.

“Because we had played in preliminary finals but hadn’t got there so 1996 was by far the best,” Sholl said.

North made the preliminary final again in 1997 before losing to Adelaide in the 1998 grand final.

Sholl played in his second premiership in 1999, in a win against Carlton.

“Then again in 1999, it was a different feeling because you realise how hard they are to get in it and to win one,” he said.

“We lost in 1998 and you would rather not play in one.

“We played Anthony Stevens with a broken leg in 1999. On the Thursday night he needled himself up that much he got through training. He had 10 kicks in the first quarter of the grand final and his leg just snapped.

“The crowds were just huge. In 1999 we were lucky in the last quarter to be up a bit so we could enjoy the game."


Craig Sholl is chaired off after the preliminary final in 2000 against Melbourne.


Among his teammates, Sholl said Wayne Carey stuck out as the best.

“It was just amazing some of the guys I got to play with. Carey is by far the best. He was an absolute freak and he worked so hard off the track,” he said.

Sholl said Pagan was a tough coach.

“Dennis was a very hard man. He is a genuine person and he could get the best out of people,” he said.

“He coached us in under-19s and then he was lucky enough to get the job in 1993. We just thought that was what you had to put up with to play league footy. His methods just didn’t work at Carlton.”

After his playing career, Sholl and his family moved to Echuca where he continued to play football before hanging up the boots for good.

He now runs a caravan park in Bright and said he had loved returning to the country way of living.
The Doctor was a a star! Anyone know how he got the nickname?
 
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Hey gents - I am wondering to pick your brains on the attached images. The frame isn’t in great condition but the jumper looks awesome. What would something like this be worth and/or would anyone know of someone wanting to offer a price? I’m in Darwin and can take it out of frame if need for cheaper and easier postage. Plaque says it was donated to the Palmerston Tavern by a well-known Darwin army regiment. I don’t know how it it is but they were getting rid of it during their spring clean! My email is justinkonradmurphy@hotmail.com
Take care, Justin.
 

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