Universal Love TRTT Part 9: Eat my ass you absolute man child

Janus

Dominus Ex Machina
Sep 9, 2007
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Ah, the old Mayan calendar clears everything up again.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
It does - watch...dream interpretation time :)

The globe and cross or globus cruciger is an emblem adopted by early Christian rulers to emphasize the dominance of the religion. The symbol combines a globe, an early Roman symbol of divine authority, with a cross. During the renaissance period, it became common to include the emblem in portraits of Christ as the compassionate Salvator Mundi (World Savior).

The emblem is still an important part of coronation ceremonies in Christian monarchies.

The globus cruciger is sometimes used as an astrological symbol for earth, and has seen occasional use as the alchemical symbol for antimony.

Antimony:

A metalloid, antimony, resembles metal in its appearance and physical properties, but does not chemically react as a metal. This elemental alchemy symbol represents animal tendencies found in humankind – a wild nature in all of us – wear this symbol when you are feeling meek – it will remind you of the animal power that dwells within you.


In other words - this dream was symbolising the animalistic, dog eat dog nature of the ruling class and society as a whole, the domineering role of religion (the globus cruciger) and the need to reject all these aspects (throwing it into the well) in favour of a different model that can unlock the hidden nature of man (using it as a key). The armies represented people searching for a new paradigm and rising up against said ruling class.
 

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sobrave

Norm Smith Medallist
Aug 15, 2015
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There's an article in the Advertiser that everyone should read about historical climate change and it's effect on the population of the world - how it causes mass migration and fighting over resources. What we are experiencing now has happened before:

“If you tried to take that through and extrapolate it to the end of the century … you’re looking at between 80 and 120 million refugees coming out of Africa every year alone. Just Africa.”

What’s causing this mass migration?

Professor Bradshaw calls it “density feedback”.

As you increase a population, what happens is that you approach an environment’s carrying capacity,” he says.

Populations — be they human, elephant, bug or bacteria — naturally grow towards the level their local environment can sustain. Once they approach and pass that level, their wellbeing falls. So a population correction must restore the balance of supply and demand.

Professor Bradshaw says the need for freshwater is already unsettling world politics. There’s the fight over the Murray-Darling. There’s the damming of the Mekong.

“Why did China take over Tibet?” he rhetorically asks. “It wasn’t because they’re just imperialists. It is because that’s where their water comes from. China is one of the most water-stressed countries in the world because it has 1.5 billion people trying to grow their own food.”

(And people wonder why China is buying dairy farms and the like - it's to ensure that they can feed their population. That's why Mr Gui bought into cattle farming.)

Entire European nations fled their homelands because of a catastrophic Bronze Age drought. Crops failed, year after year. Fires ravaged the landscape. Cities and towns could no longer be fed. Their occupants had no choice but to set out in search of a new land.

“It wasn’t just about wealth accumulation,” Professor Bradshaw says. “It was about subsistence. And when you start to mess with subsistence, people get very concerned for their lives.”

Not that the Middle East was all that better off.

Pollen analysis. Sediment cores. Oxygen-isotopes from cave stalactites. All serve to confirm the onset of a 300-year drought.

(And people here bitch about a drought that goes on for a couple of years.)

Again, written records confirm this. They also point to the strength of international relations.

“I have caused grain to be taken in ships, to keep alive this land of Hatti,” Pharaoh Merneptah proclaimed in an inscription. This was international disaster relief.

“It is a matter of life or death!” the Hittite king appealed to Ugarit over an urgent shipment of barley.

Kings ruled by the strength of bronze. Magnates grew wealthy mining and transporting its components (sound familiar?). A vast array of supporting and complementary trade grew up around it all.

But, then, as now, came technological disruption.

Then, it was iron.

The elites in their Bronze Age palaces saw the value of their trade fall away. Their diplomatic influence waned. They saw a rapid proliferation of arms beyond their own loyal soldiers.

(This is what will happen with artificial intelligence. As AI ramps up, people who were employed to do tasks that don't require any form of creativity and are solely based on logic will get replaced, and in doing so, those who base their wealth on that pyramid of power will find that their power base crumbles.)

It was a similar story for international trading corporations. Their monopolies were becoming worthless. They could no longer pay proper wages. And then there was the raiding Sea Peoples.

When you’ve got refugees flooding into a system that has more resources, there’s more competition, or at least even the perception of competition,” Professor Bradshaw says.

When there’s more competition for fewer resources, you’re going to get more entrenched views, both left and right. It works both ways. And, therefore, there is conflict.

When Ramses III took the throne in 1184BC, Egypt was under siege. Trade routes were falling, one by one. The neighbouring Libyans were probing his borders. Then, in 1177BC, the greatest assembly of Sea Peoples yet appeared off the coast.

In the Battle of the Delta, Ramses III won a comprehensive victory.

Egypt stood firm.

But it was not without cost. Ramses lost control of Canaan to tribes that would become known as the Philistines. And Egypt’s economy was gutted.

It no longer had easy access to goods it did not possess itself. Standards of living inevitably fell.

Over the next century, the once-great superpower steadily crumbled into dust.


The Sea People’s didn’t destroy everything. Disgruntled populations took care of the rest.

The biblical city of Megiddo — also known as Armageddon — was one of the very last to fall, sometime around 1130BC. It was a cosmopolitan city, with trade goods found there from far afield.

But the good life was well and truly over by 1130BC. Mycenae was no more. The Hittites had fallen. Ugarit was in ruins. Egypt was mortally wounded.

The networks that had sustained Megiddo’s economy had collapsed. So, the social contract between the population and their rulers broke down.


The priests and kings were supposed to intercede with the gods for rain. They were supposed to repel invaders.

Since they were achieving neither, what need was there for such a governing class?

(I've often said that if we were living a few centuries earlier but with the same conditions, a revolution would have happened a long time ago. People are accepting of governments because they provide the illusion of safety and control. But as resources become more scarce, that protection shatters. If you want to know why Australia is ramping up defence spending to the tune of $600 billion, and why submarines and air warfare destroyers are important...this is why.)

“I’m actually very concerned,” Professor Bradshaw says. “I have a 12-year-old daughter. Is she going to experience major war and conflict that directly threatens her? Is she going to have to live under siege, with World War II kind of scarcity of resources? Is she going to have to live with the threat of bombs being dropped every day?

“I suspect that’s going to be ultimately what happens. It’s a quest for the last remaining resources, and the strongest will prevail.”


Some people think a collapse is World War III and people eating each other in the streets, whereas, at the other extreme definition, collapse is just a continuous recession.

And that, he says, is the choice we now face.

The world overstretched. And the more we stretch it, the harder it will snap back.

“You have to agree that there is a problem and we need to fix it,” he says. “It’s our fault. Yes, we did it … We’ve got to give our children the tools to be able to get out of it. And that’s why being entrenched with particular ideologies is being most unfair to the next generation. That’s the worst part for me.”

The effort it takes to acquire resources is getting exponentially larger simply because we’ve used up all the easy stuff,” Professor Bradshaw says. “Yes, and technology can help to a certain extent. But every additional human being makes it exponentially harder to provide those resources for that same standard of living.

We might be able to support — at a Mexican standard of living — about three and a half billion people. But since we’re way past seven, now, the idea of stabilising the population is just a non-starter.

That’s the core of the problem. Too much consumption. And our capacity to sustain this population is contracting.

“It’s got to be shrunk, and it’s got to be shrunk humanely. The way to shrink it humanely to start is to give absolutely full opportunity, full legal rights and so on to women everywhere and make sure that everybody has modern contraception and safe backup abortion. That’s just ground zero. If you don’t believe in that, then you’re just saying, OK, leave it to our great-grandchildren to pay the full price.

(This is why countries in South America are clearing rainforests for farmland. This is why Trump was talking about building a wall on the Mexican border. They can see the coming apocalypse and are desperately trying to stop the inevitable flood of starving refugees that will overtax the already strained environment.)

Of course, no one will actually tell you this is the reason why they are doing these things, because they don't want to create a panic.
Article in the advertiser vs the entire science of paleo climatology
Gee I wonder who to believe *slaps forehead*
 

sobrave

Norm Smith Medallist
Aug 15, 2015
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Lol @ the cricket

A bloke who could barely get out of single figures in England has now posted the 10th highest individual score of all time, against a pop gun attack on a road. What an amazing spectacle. Joke sport
 

Laugh Laugh

Premium Gold
Jun 21, 2014
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Lol @ the cricket

A bloke who could barely get out of single figures in England has now posted the 10th highest individual score of all time, against a pop gun attack on a road. What an amazing spectacle. Joke sport
Hayden would have made 800 against that attack

The Don I'm not so sure about, I expect he would have just been too racist
 

bushwood

All Australian
Jan 11, 2009
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If you are not using the valet parking at Marion shopping centre this Xmas you are doing it wrong.
I made the foolish decision to go to Dan Murphy’s today at Marion, drove in and drove straight out, not even worth an attempt to get a park.
 

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Power Girl

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 30, 2012
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Power Girl

Just got home.

I asked the question but I’m not sure the answer helps you.

“fu** off”

I’ll try again tomorrow
Was that her answer to you or yours to me? Because I thought we were becoming friends.

Ok so I will just assume Coles is still a multinational a-hole that is more interested in their reputation than actual charitable works, so not a huge shift in my thinking.

Thanks and good luck tomorrow.
 

Eddie Dingle

Poopship Destroyer
Apr 16, 2007
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Was that her answer to you or yours to me? Because I thought we were becoming friends.

Ok so I will just assume Coles is still a multinational a-hole that is more interested in their reputation than actual charitable works, so not a huge shift in my thinking.

Thanks and good luck tomorrow.
Oh no don’t blame Coles for that or the love of my life.

That was directed at me.

I’ll get a response for you. When I’m a bit soberer
 

Laugh Laugh

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Jun 21, 2014
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10 bucks. Park your car for you, have it ready for you when you want to leave and had a couple of free drinks in the departure lounge and some charlesworth chocolate bags for free.
Where in Marion do you drive in for that?

We used to just go to the hand car wash for convenience
 

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