Verbal Faux Pas, Jargon, Cliches, Boganisms, etc

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Norm Smith Medallist
Apr 12, 2005
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I'm not 100% sure, but I reckon Tania Armstrong (Triple M, Perth) said "blind-slided", then said that a deal was "broachered".
7m48s into this podcast. She was on the phone, so it's not clear enough

 

Father Jack

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There's no fighting the 'would of' thing, it's so widespread now that in a few years it will be acceptable. Same as using 'laconic' to mean 'laid back' or 'without much visible effort', or to use 'decimate' to mean 'almost totally destroyed'. When i lived in Queensland I used to rail to against the use of 'AFL' to refer to the sport, until I gave up and accepted that it was actually a useful shorthand in a region where 'football' could mean any one of four different sports.
 

Dogs_R_Us

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There's no fighting the 'would of' thing, it's so widespread now that in a few years it will be acceptable. Same as using 'laconic' to mean 'laid back' or 'without much visible effort', or to use 'decimate' to mean 'almost totally destroyed'. When i lived in Queensland I used to rail to against the use of 'AFL' to refer to the sport, until I gave up and accepted that it was actually a useful shorthand in a region where 'football' could mean any one of four different sports.
Yes, the other day I heard about some photos that had surfaced showing AFL being played in the 1800s!
 

deltablues

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There's no fighting the 'would of' thing, it's so widespread now that in a few years it will be acceptable. Same as using 'laconic' to mean 'laid back' or 'without much visible effort', or to use 'decimate' to mean 'almost totally destroyed'. When i lived in Queensland I used to rail to against the use of 'AFL' to refer to the sport, until I gave up and accepted that it was actually a useful shorthand in a region where 'football' could mean any one of four different sports.
And punctuation: the singular for plural there's//there're is a lost cause: e.g. 'there's some dark clouds over there'.

There is some clouds.

OK.

There are good reasons to pay attention to correct punctuation, especially when one has just helped one's uncle, Jack, off a horse.

And it's always important to distinguish 'know your sh*t' from 'know you're sh*t'.
.
 

peternorth

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May 6, 2005
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There's no fighting the 'would of' thing, it's so widespread now that in a few years it will be acceptable. Same as using 'laconic' to mean 'laid back' or 'without much visible effort', or to use 'decimate' to mean 'almost totally destroyed'. When i lived in Queensland I used to rail to against the use of 'AFL' to refer to the sport, until I gave up and accepted that it was actually a useful shorthand in a region where 'football' could mean any one of four different sports.
Good points made well. Although decimate can suggest a large section of proportion destroyed, as opposed to 10%.

"AFL" is a fascinating one. Commentators refer to the second tier as VFL/SANFL/WAFL/NEAFL etc. And the seniors as the AFL, or they're playing AFL. However when a player is dropped, they're playing VFL/SANFL/WAFL/NEAFL, not AFL.

So which is it? Is "AFL" a name for the top league, or is it the name for the "sport/game"?

And punctuation: the singular for plural there's//there're is a lost cause: e.g. 'there's some dark clouds over there'.

There is some clouds.

OK.

There are good reasons to pay attention to correct punctuation, especially when one has just helped one's uncle, Jack, off a horse.

And it's always important to distinguish 'know your sh*t' from 'know you're sh*t'.
.

YOUR BIAS!
 

Cleavy

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last night on the 3AW news update at 11pm (presumably taken from 6PR, since they were covering the game), the newsreader said that "Cyril" Rioli kicked 3 goals for West Coast.
 

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Norm Smith Medallist
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Another new, sh1t one that's unstoppable is people saying that they're "excited for the football today", instead of "excited about".
It does my head in... well, not as much as other things, but it obviously doesn't make sense. :D

Linguist Professor Kate Burridge is sometimes on the radio, and it really surprises me how lenient she is about new ways of speaking.
 
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Norm Smith Medallist
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Here's a little one from Michael Roberts: "I just heard him over-say", obviously instead of "I just overheard him say".

Wayne Schwass, talking to Richmond's season to Neil Balme: "...then you got a few wins under the bank"

That reminds me: with Wayne's retirement from Triple M today, I won't have to hear Mark Howard mispronounce his name 30 times every Sunday.
He calls him "Shwosh". He's hardly alone; even Wayne doesn't pronounce his own name properly!. He calls himself "Waybe Swoss"!! FFS!!

Several words with the "sch" prefix get mispronounced with an "s" sound instead of a "sh" sound, such as "snitzel".
If that happened will all sch-suffixed words, comedy schtick would be "comedy stick", David Scwimmer would be "David "Swimmer" (ha), and Peter Schwab would be Peter "Swob". Ew! Ha. :D
 
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