Weight loss

AFDogs

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Thread starter #1
Have been dieting pretty heavily for 2 weeks now - with footy training and heavy weight lifting as my workouts during the week. I am eating much healthier, taking supplements and have noticed an instant difference in my 'mentality' during the week. I was previously experiencing sleeping problems and extreme anxiety, and those have both disappeared. I have cut out the weekend benders for the meantime and am focussing on staying in with the philosophy of saving money and carbs.

I "look" and "feel" like I've lost weight - but the scales are telling a different story. Probably due to building muscle from my gym workouts. I'm reasonably happy with my progress so far. 6'2 and 103kgs - I'm not huge but I want to take that extra step and get down to about 95kgs.

Anyway, share some tips for weight loss apart from the obvious ones. Looking for any little tips that will help me moving forward. Also share your weight loss stories, if you have any.
 

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Engimal v3

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#2
Have been dieting pretty heavily for 2 weeks now - with footy training and heavy weight lifting as my workouts during the week. I am eating much healthier, taking supplements and have noticed an instant difference in my 'mentality' during the week. I was previously experiencing sleeping problems and extreme anxiety, and those have both disappeared. I have cut out the weekend benders for the meantime and am focussing on staying in with the philosophy of saving money and carbs.

I "look" and "feel" like I've lost weight - but the scales are telling a different story. Probably due to building muscle from my gym workouts. I'm reasonably happy with my progress so far. 6'2 and 103kgs - I'm not huge but I want to take that extra step and get down to about 95kgs.

Anyway, share some tips for weight loss apart from the obvious ones. Looking for any little tips that will help me moving forward. Also share your weight loss stories, if you have any.

2 weeks is probably a bit too soon to tell. You can have a big meal and fluctuate greatly on the scales. I'd wait another 3 before getting on the scales again. The most important thing is that you're feeling better, which has to be a sign, right?
 

Bazzar

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#3
Have been dieting pretty heavily for 2 weeks now - with footy training and heavy weight lifting as my workouts during the week. I am eating much healthier, taking supplements and have noticed an instant difference in my 'mentality' during the week. I was previously experiencing sleeping problems and extreme anxiety, and those have both disappeared. I have cut out the weekend benders for the meantime and am focussing on staying in with the philosophy of saving money and carbs.

I "look" and "feel" like I've lost weight - but the scales are telling a different story. Probably due to building muscle from my gym workouts. I'm reasonably happy with my progress so far. 6'2 and 103kgs - I'm not huge but I want to take that extra step and get down to about 95kgs.

Anyway, share some tips for weight loss apart from the obvious ones. Looking for any little tips that will help me moving forward. Also share your weight loss stories, if you have any.
For rapid weight loss and at the same time preserving lean tissue mass for weights and footy, a protein-sparing modified fast (PSMF) has a proven track record dating back to the mid 70's, and reinvented by Lyle McDonald in mid 2000

The basic idea is heavy calorie restriction and eating enough protein to preserve lean tissue mass and enough micronutrients to avoid deficiency and keeping carbs and fats to a minimum.

Some good reading here
https://optimisingnutrition.com/2017/06/17/psmf/


Medical applications of the PSMF
In the medical application of the PSMF patients obtain the majority of their energy from protein while keeping energy from carbohydrates and fat low.[1]

  • Protein levels are set at 1.2 to 1.5 g/kg of ideal body weight per day. (For someone with 30% body fat wanting to get to 10% body fat this would be equivalent to 1.5 to 1.9g protein per kilogram of lean body mass or LBM.)
  • Carbohydrate intake is typically restricted to less than 20 to 50 g/day.
  • Additional dietary fat beyond what comes with lean protein sources is minimised.
  • Patients in the weight loss clinic setting are restricted to less than 800 kcal/day.
The Cleveland Clinic has done extensive research into the use of adequate protein low-calorie diets for aggressive weight loss with the following encouraging findings:[2] [3] [4]

  • patients are encouraged by the initial period of rapid weight loss which leads to a lower dropout rate;[5]
  • meal replacements in the form of commercial shakes or bars can be used, however learning to make meals from whole foods critical to developing habits that lay the foundation for long-term success;
  • the PSMF is effective for people with normal glycemic control as well as pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes;[6]
  • people on a whole food-based PSMF are significantly less hungry and preoccupied with eating compared to those on a liquid-formula based version of the PSMF; and
  • most of the weight lost during a PSMF is from fat tissue rather than muscle.[7]


 
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Moderator #4
Have been dieting pretty heavily for 2 weeks now - with footy training and heavy weight lifting as my workouts during the week. I am eating much healthier, taking supplements and have noticed an instant difference in my 'mentality' during the week. I was previously experiencing sleeping problems and extreme anxiety, and those have both disappeared. I have cut out the weekend benders for the meantime and am focussing on staying in with the philosophy of saving money and carbs.

I "look" and "feel" like I've lost weight - but the scales are telling a different story. Probably due to building muscle from my gym workouts. I'm reasonably happy with my progress so far. 6'2 and 103kgs - I'm not huge but I want to take that extra step and get down to about 95kgs.

Anyway, share some tips for weight loss apart from the obvious ones. Looking for any little tips that will help me moving forward. Also share your weight loss stories, if you have any.
Congrats on trying to be healthier mate.

I've lost around 30kgs in the last 18months without really "dieting" or "training". I was surprised how easy it was honestly. I just made a few changes & tried to be more aware about my choices.

My idea is I'm allowed to "fail" every now and then... it's called living. The most important thing is the good outweighs the bad & I feel good about my choices no matter if I choose the "good" or "bad" option. If I have take out tonight then I need to not let it happen again this week (& maybe schedule a run or something). But still live life & focus on being the best you. Happy & Healthy.

I have given myself some rough "guidelines", none of which are strict & are broken every now and then...

- No/minimal alcohol weekdays unless an 'event'.

- Tried to replace softdrinks & junkfood as much as possible. Whole foods that have nothing done to them that are local, sustainable, organic & delicious are so much better for you, the community you live & the world in general. A little wanky I guess... If it helps I've also found a kg of sweet potatoes or a cauliflower are so much cheaper, have more uses & go so much further than some packaged artificial product sent from NewZealand or something.

- Allow myself cheat meals etc. E.g. I always have takeaway Friday lunch & make sure I'm relaxed over the weekend. I still go to the pub & have a snitty etc. I'm just more aware of what I have, when & how it fits into my week.

- Drink more water. Actively try to do this (it was harder than I thought but made a huge difference to my day/hunger levels etc).

- Don't beat yourself up. Be positive & believe you can & you will. Because you can. And you will.

Also with the weighong yourself, always do it at the same time everyday. You'll weigh all over the place depending on what point of the day it is & what you have/havn't consumed/done.

Good luck!
 

Sammymoite

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#5
Have been dieting pretty heavily for 2 weeks now - with footy training and heavy weight lifting as my workouts during the week. I am eating much healthier, taking supplements and have noticed an instant difference in my 'mentality' during the week. I was previously experiencing sleeping problems and extreme anxiety, and those have both disappeared. I have cut out the weekend benders for the meantime and am focussing on staying in with the philosophy of saving money and carbs.

I "look" and "feel" like I've lost weight - but the scales are telling a different story. Probably due to building muscle from my gym workouts. I'm reasonably happy with my progress so far. 6'2 and 103kgs - I'm not huge but I want to take that extra step and get down to about 95kgs.

Anyway, share some tips for weight loss apart from the obvious ones. Looking for any little tips that will help me moving forward. Also share your weight loss stories, if you have any.
If I may, what sort of supplements are you taking? Trying to cut down as well, just curious.
 

HARKER

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#6
Everyone will have a different story of how to lose weight, but the one thing you need above all else is.........Discipline.

Can't speak for others and it probably doesn't work this way for many, but it can be just as satisfying in not having something you want, as it can be for having it. There's a real self-gratification to be gained in saying no, knowing you have haven't allowed yourself to be tricked by yourself.
 

Demosthenes

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#7
I must say I was never significantly overweight. But I weighed a few kegs more than I wanted to, and spent years trying to get them off. For me, when I succeeded, the biggest thing was keeping it simple. I promised myself two things:

1) The discipline to just get active every morning. If I promise myself I'll get up at six and walk around the block, by the time I'm in my gear and moving I often change my mind and go for an hour-long run.

2) The discipline to not consume processed food or drink. For practical reasons I had night a week off, either for a date or dinner out with friends. Otherwise, I just made sure I cooked what I ate and drank water. Basic meat and three veg became de rigeur. I relied on the lower caloric density of the food to naturally restrict my energy intake.

I didn't worry about anything else. Not a thing. **** scales, **** measurements, **** high intensity gym programs, **** calorie counting. Maybe those things would have taken the weight off quicker but I didn't have the mental energy for that.

For me, simplicity was the only thing that worked and continues to work.
 

La Dispute

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#8
Visualisation is a massive one too I reckon.

Despite being a bit an old-school NLP trick, just thinking about yourself looking the way you want to look whether it's slim, or lean and muscular, or ripped or whatever gives you an impetus to actually go out and do it. You can also do it mid-exercise if you're struggling for motivation or just need that extra boost to get to the end.

A lot of healthy behaviours work in with each other too. If you wake up and get your exercise out of the way early you're more likely to eat well during the day, so you don't feel like you've jeopardised the hard work you've already put in.

Plus little things like not buying shitty foods, or replacing those shitty foods (everyone loves a snack) with fruits or nuts.
 
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#10
To me it's about long term fixes. I don't eat lollies or never grew up in a family with cans of coke in the fridge, but I basically don't eat things like flour, pasta, bread and those sort of carbs. Avoid tinned things as much as possible. Very rarely eat red meat and if I do it's splurging on a good sirloin down the pub once every few months. Try to eat vegetarian three or four days a week at least and generally do.

Like everyone you have a craving for a classic pasta or a carb heavy meal but I actually enjoy finding substitutes. There are lots of pasta substitutes that are a bit more expensive (Quinoa or buckwheat) or time consuming (zucchini) but I've enjoyed doing things like vegetarian lasagna: you learn how to cook, it gives you an afternoon task, you realise how easily exchanged meat is, and you generally feel pretty guilt free after eating it. I like learning to use all sorts of veggies to 'meat' out traditional dishes, or else trying stuff I never would have bothered with before.

I should say I'm someone who was never fat at all but last year I got into some bad habits. Would drink four stubbies a night at least because I was at uni then working until midnight. Was getting to the stage where a normal Saturday night was getting through a carton with a mate and knocking off two pizzas or a big load of fish and chips. No longer being 17 and skinny as a rake, as well as not having that lifestyle of two hours of sport a day, it was obviously way harder to shed. I was getting to a point where I was just relapsing to base emotions: eating feels good, fat feels good, sugar feels good, being drunk feels good. I mean I was by no means an alcoholic and I was about 78 kilos at the most, but you have to be realistic about your metabolism slowing. I was used to be skinny and feeling stuff like a bit of flab when you laid on a certain angle felt like shit because it was so foreign. I don't want to be massive, don't want big arms, don't go to the gym, I prefer the rakier look and want to be thinner and not have a guts and also enjoying not waking up feeling sluggish.

Feel good now, dropped a few kegs and quite happily have a meal that's a luxury once a week, drink a few beers Friday, have a few more Saturday, and wind down with some Sunday but the pious way to saying no to things or to embracing it. I can easily do this for the rest of my life, because I don't really do stupid fad shit. I love a packet of chips, not really into sweet stuff, and I still have a packet a week. Would probably have dropped to 65 kilos if I never had them or a pint for two months but **** that.

Basically the outcome is learning a lot more meals, cooking more, feeling fresh most days and not lethargic, embracing some self-control (don't eat that packet of chips, go for even a half hour run), and losing kilos and maintain a good weight.

As others have said there is a certain smuggery to but hey, if that's the thing that keeps you healthier, who gives a ****? I keep it to myself and wouldn't ever say it to anyone else, but I work with people and we all do probably 10,000-15,000 steps a day, but they're having Starbusts 'for the energy' and ducking to Nandos or KFC for lunch about three times a week. And a fried chicken california roll is what they call a healthy option.

If you drink shit like coke and eat a pizza every weekend, I'm almost jealous of you. If you even cut those two things out and start trying to walk even 5,000 steps a day, you're going to have some pretty good results.
 

Bazzar

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#11
To me it's about long term fixes. I don't eat lollies or never grew up in a family with cans of coke in the fridge, but I basically don't eat things like flour, pasta, bread and those sort of carbs. Avoid tinned things as much as possible. Very rarely eat red meat and if I do it's splurging on a good sirloin down the pub once every few months. Try to eat vegetarian three or four days a week at least and generally do.

Like everyone you have a craving for a classic pasta or a carb heavy meal but I actually enjoy finding substitutes. There are lots of pasta substitutes that are a bit more expensive (Quinoa or buckwheat) or time consuming (zucchini) but I've enjoyed doing things like vegetarian lasagna: you learn how to cook, it gives you an afternoon task, you realise how easily exchanged meat is, and you generally feel pretty guilt free after eating it. I like learning to use all sorts of veggies to 'meat' out traditional dishes, or else trying stuff I never would have bothered with before.

I should say I'm someone who was never fat at all but last year I got into some bad habits. Would drink four stubbies a night at least because I was at uni then working until midnight. Was getting to the stage where a normal Saturday night was getting through a carton with a mate and knocking off two pizzas or a big load of fish and chips. No longer being 17 and skinny as a rake, as well as not having that lifestyle of two hours of sport a day, it was obviously way harder to shed. I was getting to a point where I was just relapsing to base emotions: eating feels good, fat feels good, sugar feels good, being drunk feels good. I mean I was by no means an alcoholic and I was about 78 kilos at the most, but you have to be realistic about your metabolism slowing. I was used to be skinny and feeling stuff like a bit of flab when you laid on a certain angle felt like shit because it was so foreign. I don't want to be massive, don't want big arms, don't go to the gym, I prefer the rakier look and want to be thinner and not have a guts and also enjoying not waking up feeling sluggish.

Feel good now, dropped a few kegs and quite happily have a meal that's a luxury once a week, drink a few beers Friday, have a few more Saturday, and wind down with some Sunday but the pious way to saying no to things or to embracing it. I can easily do this for the rest of my life, because I don't really do stupid fad shit. I love a packet of chips, not really into sweet stuff, and I still have a packet a week. Would probably have dropped to 65 kilos if I never had them or a pint for two months but **** that.

Basically the outcome is learning a lot more meals, cooking more, feeling fresh most days and not lethargic, embracing some self-control (don't eat that packet of chips, go for even a half hour run), and losing kilos and maintain a good weight.

As others have said there is a certain smuggery to but hey, if that's the thing that keeps you healthier, who gives a ****? I keep it to myself and wouldn't ever say it to anyone else, but I work with people and we all do probably 10,000-15,000 steps a day, but they're having Starbusts 'for the energy' and ducking to Nandos or KFC for lunch about three times a week. And a fried chicken california roll is what they call a healthy option.

If you drink shit like coke and eat a pizza every weekend, I'm almost jealous of you. If you even cut those two things out and start trying to walk even 5,000 steps a day, you're going to have some pretty good results.
Great post
 

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HARKER

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#12
As others have said there is a certain smuggery to but hey, if that's the thing that keeps you healthier, who gives a ****? I keep it to myself and wouldn't ever say it to anyone else, but I work with people and we all do probably 10,000-15,000 steps a day, but they're having Starbusts 'for the energy' and ducking to Nandos or KFC for lunch about three times a week. And a fried chicken california roll is what they call a healthy option.

If you drink shit like coke and eat a pizza every weekend, I'm almost jealous of you. If you even cut those two things out and start trying to walk even 5,000 steps a day, you're going to have some pretty good results.
15,000 steps a day?
Doesn't sound like much but that's over two solid hours of fast-paced walking per day.
Unless you're pounding it out on a treadmill, I don't know how one can reach those levels.
 
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#13
15,000 steps a day?
Doesn't sound like much but that's over two solid hours of fast-paced walking per day.
Unless you're pounding it out on a treadmill, I don't know how one can reach those levels.
It's a job on your feet all day, generally nine to ten hours.

I would imagine café staff, retail workers, and store people to do a similar amount of steps.
 
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#14
Congrats on trying to be healthier mate.

I've lost around 30kgs in the last 18months without really "dieting" or "training". I was surprised how easy it was honestly. I just made a few changes & tried to be more aware about my choices.

My idea is I'm allowed to "fail" every now and then... it's called living. The most important thing is the good outweighs the bad & I feel good about my choices no matter if I choose the "good" or "bad" option. If I have take out tonight then I need to not let it happen again this week (& maybe schedule a run or something). But still live life & focus on being the best you. Happy & Healthy.

I have given myself some rough "guidelines", none of which are strict & are broken every now and then...

- No/minimal alcohol weekdays unless an 'event'.

- Tried to replace softdrinks & junkfood as much as possible. Whole foods that have nothing done to them that are local, sustainable, organic & delicious are so much better for you, the community you live & the world in general. A little wanky I guess... If it helps I've also found a kg of sweet potatoes or a cauliflower are so much cheaper, have more uses & go so much further than some packaged artificial product sent from NewZealand or something.

- Allow myself cheat meals etc. E.g. I always have takeaway Friday lunch & make sure I'm relaxed over the weekend. I still go to the pub & have a snitty etc. I'm just more aware of what I have, when & how it fits into my week.

- Drink more water. Actively try to do this (it was harder than I thought but made a huge difference to my day/hunger levels etc).

- Don't beat yourself up. Be positive & believe you can & you will. Because you can. And you will.

Also with the weighong yourself, always do it at the same time everyday. You'll weigh all over the place depending on what point of the day it is & what you have/havn't consumed/done.

Good luck!
Good post and advice :thumbsu:
 
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#15
What are peoples interpretations of processed foods? Is a can of tuna or salmon considered processed? To me basically everything you buy from a supermarket is " processed "
 
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Moderator #16
What are peoples interpretations of processed foods? Is a can of tuna or salmon considered processed? To me basically everything you buy from a supermarket is " processed "
If it's packaged I look at what the ingredients are & how many there are.

Are they natural ingredients or does it look like a science experiment. Do I know what the ingredients are? E.g. do you really know what "natural gum fibre" is or are they just trying to say sugar without saying it?

Is the list extensive? If so, why? Most of the time you don't need everything that's been added.

I like to go for the whole food options as much as possible. Things that have grown & not been changed/proccessed by human hand.
 
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#17
Anyone looked into this guys philosophy's on diet and products. Obviously he's pushing his product, but he backs it up with good eating plans and recipes. Ive been using the shakes along with a whole change in diet for about a month and have dropped nearly ten kilos. At 6 foot i was 105, now around 95 - 96. The dog is getting more exercise and the weights in the shed have been dusted off.

http://www.themanshake.com.au/
 

AFDogs

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Thread starter #18
If I may, what sort of supplements are you taking? Trying to cut down as well, just curious.
Herbalife, lol. I've been criticized for it, but I got a pretty good deal.

It comes with tea, multi-vitamins and meal replacement shakes (which I only have for breaky really).

It works... kind of.
 

Bazzar

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#19
Manshakes, herbalife, all promotional gimmicks. Replace them with a basic, but high quality Bulk Nutrients Whey Protein Concentrate. At the end of the day the shakes, and many use them as meal replacements, are just to provide extra protein, the added vitamin and mineral bs is just that, bs.
Bulk Nutrients is top shelf quality, low cal and filling if you want them as a meal replacement.
 

Aussie Joe

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#21
I lost 45kg in 12 months. Keep weight off for three years and counting. Tips:
- Brutal discipline. No cheat days, ever
- Calories out > Calories in.
- count calories every single meal. 1800 cals on typical day, few hundred higher on high activity days
- stopped drinking
- cardio. I run at least 6km every day and run half marathon races every month
- stopped eating red meat and cheese
- dont eat junk food and haven’t stepping into a fast food joint since starting
- still drink odd Diet Coke

It was completely life altering. Don’t miss old fat self and never going back.

Tried to put on larger muscle mass. It screwed with my diet/weight goals and my running. I live for longer distances and leaner body is better suited to that type.
 

mattyb2607

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#22
the missus and i have just started on diets, into our 3rd week now and have lost 5 kilos, all we have done is no takeaway, no sweets, no soft drinks, have a more balanced diet with smaller potions and walk every morning and a few times a week at night, and drink a lot of water, still have cravings, but have managed not to cave in to them.

Have noticed a difference already, beer gut is shrinking and my pants are starting to get to big for me and i feel much better for it, I'm 6'3 and started at 106.5 and im down to 101.5, looking to get down to about 90
 

mattyb2607

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#23
Anyone looked into this guys philosophy's on diet and products. Obviously he's pushing his product, but he backs it up with good eating plans and recipes. Ive been using the shakes along with a whole change in diet for about a month and have dropped nearly ten kilos. At 6 foot i was 105, now around 95 - 96. The dog is getting more exercise and the weights in the shed have been dusted off.

http://www.themanshake.com.au/
head office at work is running a weight loss comp, this is how we got started, and one of the General Managers is having nothing but these for a month, breakfast, lunch and dinner, dropped about 6kg in the first week, not sure how much he lost in the 2nd week
 

brutus76

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#25
Currently have broken leg and metal rob in tibia (2 foot long half inch thick) - strained medial left knee and bruising on my dominant left arm.
Was very big when accident happened 2 months ago (riding my motorbike)
in 2 months since lost 10-15 already - aiming for another 30 once i start rehab full time (when i can walk without crutches).
More watching what i ate than an actual diet.
Rehab of light weights (i have broad enough shoulders) pool (laps and running as i can't run on solid ground for 6 months) and yoga (for balance and flexibility) hoping to be 100kg or less by the time i go to the USA in November (for Thanksgiving)
 
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