Society/Culture What are parents doing these days to help their child’s cognitive development?

Remove this Banner Ad

Kram

I'll brik u
May 2, 2007
61,188
78,455
WA
AFL Club
Fremantle
Other Teams
Chicago Bears, de Boer, Arsenal
There's this media myth that kids are all coddled because they didn't go through the traditional hazing ritual of having a raddish shoved up your arse on the first day of school.

People without kids then roll around wailing about something that isn't even a problem.

Meanwhile, childhood deaths due to accident are dropping, but mental health is either worsening or is simply being diagnosed better.
I think that they are a bit but its far better to arguably go a little too far that way than to have things how they were in the past.

What does having your own kids have to do with having an opinion?
 

Chief

Elastico Gomez
Dec 1, 1999
89,544
64,436
Brisbane
AFL Club
Carlton
What does having your own kids have to do with having an opinion?
If you have no kids then you are not likely to have day to day contact with the children everyone says are coddled. You're likely to listen to shrill media reports instead of knowing the everyday experience.

Diet, medicine, technology have all advanced. Not evenly for everyone but getting grumpy because kids don't work down mines or have to pad their diet with leaves and gravel while in the trenches fighting against Communists, like we all did in t'olden days, is silly.
 

Dhoni Dakurri

All Australian
Oct 18, 2016
873
1,057
AFL Club
West Coast
Parents do this more now then at any time in history as they race to get their kids ahead of other kids.

you should of taught kids during the 80s when they suffered from
lead poisioning as kids and their parents were hippies with no care about education. No those kids were screwed in the head.
Lead poisoning from the pencils they learnt to write with at home?
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
57,085
61,378
AFL Club
West Coast
If you have no kids then you are not likely to have day to day contact with the children everyone says are coddled. You're likely to listen to shrill media reports instead of knowing the everyday experience.

Diet, medicine, technology have all advanced. Not evenly for everyone but getting grumpy because kids don't work down mines or have to pad their diet with leaves and gravel while in the trenches fighting against Communists, like we all did in t'olden days, is silly.
This is BigFooty. None of us play in the AFL but we all have opinions on footy. Meanwhile people that did play in the AFL get paid to have opinions on footy despite being the equivalent of posters who use 'bias' as an adjective and 'he's' as a possessive.

I don't have kids, but I know loooots of people that do. As an outsider looking in you get an objective view of what kids are like, what parents do/don't do etc. rather than sort of baselining against your own kids/parenting. Teachers (OP) also see 25-30 kids a day (more like 100 they are a high school teacher) so get a good cross section of what different kids are like, compared to parents who see their own kids most of the time. I know plenty of teachers who call it how it is, most parents tend to see their own kids through rose coloured glasses.

The "as a parent..." brigade are pretty annoying. There's a big difference between having a kid and raising one.
 

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
57,085
61,378
AFL Club
West Coast
I remember when the teacher said you had to work in a group and then present to the class. And you didn't get to choose the group.

Would've been so much easier to just claim mental health and not do that.
 

Chief

Elastico Gomez
Dec 1, 1999
89,544
64,436
Brisbane
AFL Club
Carlton
I remember when the teacher said you had to work in a group and then present to the class. And you didn't get to choose the group.

Would've been so much easier to just claim mental health and not do that.
And would the teacher have said "OK if you've got issues, lets talk to a counselor and get your parents in"?

This is nonsense.
 

Chief

Elastico Gomez
Dec 1, 1999
89,544
64,436
Brisbane
AFL Club
Carlton
You are being obtuse. In 2000 playing the mental health card had no weight. Hence would've been easier. Having to talk to other kids and present in front of a class isn't clinical anxiety.
You are incredibly clueless.
You speak a lot about things you believe you know about, but your posts show you know nothing. You make it up based on some hysterical headlines and your own misinterpretation of what you see.
When was “having to talk in front a class” declared to be clinical anxiety? Never.
 

Scotland

TheBrownDog
May 5, 2006
57,085
61,378
AFL Club
West Coast
You are incredibly clueless.
You speak a lot about things you believe you know about, but your posts show you know nothing. You make it up based on some hysterical headlines and your own misinterpretation of what you see.
When was “having to talk in front a class” declared to be clinical anxiety? Never.
Ball is there if you want to play it.

'Make it up based on hysterical headlines' FMD.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

00Stinger

Duel Group 1 winner
May 8, 2007
25,249
27,777
@ HOME
AFL Club
Melbourne
Other Teams
Liverpool & San Francisco 49ers
My kids are 2 & 1/2 and 4 & 1/2

We read to them at night before bed maybe 3-4 nights a week. My older one I read and get him to copy what I have read, my younger one is more about me reading and then me getting him to point out objects in the book like balloons, colours ext

I had my oldest being able to count and identify numbers up to 20 by about 2 years old I reckon

They use their ipads a bit but I have them playing games most times that involve problem solving tasks, spacial awareness, matching letters/numbers ext

Last christmas I got my oldest who was almost 4 at the time a Lego game on the xbxo for us to play together. I reckon I helped him very little (manily around getting him started and the reading parts ) and he finished the game in about 10 weeks. And when I say finished it I mean he finished every level and in an open world game collected all the collectable and side tasks. since then he has now finished 4 10+ lego games and he probably plays it for a n hour a day max

My kids and hypo things that never stop though, because despite this they spend a fu** load of time playing outside on their scooters and in their cubby hut
 

biggiemediums

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 20, 2010
6,022
6,646
AFL Club
Collingwood
Other Teams
Chelsea, Storm, Heart.
I don’t have a biological child, but I have raised a kid who’s now 6 and a half.

Gaming/reading/grappling are the main activities we chose together. He’s become a great puzzle solver, his logic and deduction are great for his age. Speech and reading have improved leaps and bounds and the grappling Is giving him great coordination and understanding that thinking>brute force.

To the posters arguing above... yes kids are way more coddled and weak. Some of his friends are pathetic because of soft parenting.
 

utility

Norm Smith Medallist
Sep 26, 2003
9,369
5,973
Melbourne
AFL Club
North Melbourne
To the posters arguing above... yes kids are way more coddled and weak. Some of his friends are pathetic because of soft parenting.
I think this is a bigger problem than the three Rs.

I don't believe parents enforce behavioural standards (discipline) enough. Schools are not geared to make them resilient. I'm not advocating kids should be abused but they need to face adversity and learn how to overcome it. I think it's neglected in modern Australian society, a very soft (weak) society.
 

ShanDog

Super Moderator
Aug 12, 2012
19,759
38,162
sv_cheats 1
AFL Club
Carlton
Other Teams
Edmonton Oilers
My kids are 2 & 1/2 and 4 & 1/2

We read to them at night before bed maybe 3-4 nights a week. My older one I read and get him to copy what I have read, my younger one is more about me reading and then me getting him to point out objects in the book like balloons, colours ext

I had my oldest being able to count and identify numbers up to 20 by about 2 years old I reckon

They use their ipads a bit but I have them playing games most times that involve problem solving tasks, spacial awareness, matching letters/numbers ext

Last christmas I got my oldest who was almost 4 at the time a Lego game on the xbxo for us to play together. I reckon I helped him very little (manily around getting him started and the reading parts ) and he finished the game in about 10 weeks. And when I say finished it I mean he finished every level and in an open world game collected all the collectable and side tasks. since then he has now finished 4 10+ lego games and he probably plays it for a n hour a day max

My kids and hypo things that never stop though, because despite this they spend a fu** load of time playing outside on their scooters and in their cubby hut
Pretty much exactly the same for my kids who are only slightly older. They are picking up numbers and letters very quickly and their language skills are really impressive. Wish they'd shut the hell up TBH... lol

Is it still common for parents to read to their kids? Teach them to read? Learn basic numeracy? Encourage playing with other kids in interactive environments?

I’m a high school teacher and I’ve never been more terrified about how incapable students are coming into high school. A huge percentage can’t read or write. They have no ability to focus for more than a minute. The mental health and behavioural issues are destructive and widespread.

What is happening at home?
I teach high school English and HaSS in a low SES area. It's very clear (according to research and my experience) that kids from these areas don't have the parental engagement in their learning required to keep in step with the standards of literacy and numeracy expected these days.

We did. I don’t know where your school is but a huge percentage can’t read or write? What is a huge percentage?
Reading comprehension study at my school showed that roughly 50% of the current year 10 kids were reading at a year 5 level. Something like less than 10% were at the same level as their age. Again, this is a low SES school, and that's where these numbers would be seen. It would be very different in wealthy areas.

Parents do this more now then at any time in history as they race to get their kids ahead of other kids.
Some do. Those who can afford to and who had a good education themselves. This is why the gap between the high achievers and low achievers in schooling (and further into society later) is widening.
 

Evolved1

Norm Smith Medallist
Jun 14, 2013
5,209
5,843
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Phil Ivey
This is BigFooty. None of us play in the AFL but we all have opinions on footy. Meanwhile people that did play in the AFL get paid to have opinions on footy despite being the equivalent of posters who use 'bias' as an adjective and 'he's' as a possessive.

I don't have kids, but I know loooots of people that do. As an outsider looking in you get an objective view of what kids are like, what parents do/don't do etc. rather than sort of baselining against your own kids/parenting. Teachers (OP) also see 25-30 kids a day (more like 100 they are a high school teacher) so get a good cross section of what different kids are like, compared to parents who see their own kids most of the time. I know plenty of teachers who call it how it is, most parents tend to see their own kids through rose coloured glasses.

The "as a parent..." brigade are pretty annoying. There's a big difference between having a kid and raising one.
There's only so much you can understand as an outsider looking in at any issue. As a Caucasian male, I accept that I have a limited understanding of the experiences and vantage points of females and Aboriginals.

My wife and I had children before my sister had hers, and I remember her judging us because we often had early departure times from family events when my kids were young. After my sister had kids of her own and started leaving family events early, she gained a different perspective of the issue.

There's no parenting manual that comes with babies, and they all have unique personalities and issues. It's a lot harder than it looks.
 

Chief

Elastico Gomez
Dec 1, 1999
89,544
64,436
Brisbane
AFL Club
Carlton
I remember her judging us because we often had early departure times from family events when my kids were young.
I remember chasing my 2 year old around a party with a friend taunting me for not being able to stand still for a yarn and a drink.

About 5 years later he is doing exactly the same thing, with us heaping it on him. He was not smiling.
 

Power Raid

TheBrownDog
Oct 15, 2004
68,227
57,823
West Perth
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
Regardless of the day (now or the past), kids who have loving parents that invest time and energy into learning and encourage extra curriculum activities are obviously more likely to succeed.

With two parents working these days, more often than not, it is easy to understand why certain parents fail to invest the time and energy needed.
 

Remove this Banner Ad

Remove this Banner Ad