What are you listening to right now? Pt VI

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CliffMcTainshaw

Club Legend
Apr 11, 2015
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Cill Chainnigh
Fantastic Album, she was really into bass players back then. Her follow up albums had Jaco Pastorious on bass and then she married one, Larry Klein. She is a great songwriter, singer and guitarist. Not to mention her great skills as a painter. Her Shadows and Light album is my favourite.
 

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smasha

πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…
Sep 7, 2003
46,231
53,104
Richmond Paddock
AFL Club
Richmond
Nice.
What’s with the vinyl? Is there an argument to say it improves the listen, even though it’s through digital YouTube streaming. Find that hard to believe.
I found it on you tube.
That setup is worth 7k and sounds amazing but an enormous expense.
I’m glad he puts up the videos for all to enjoy.
This was my first ever listen to the album and I love it,bought it through Joni’s Amazon site on cd.
I think vinyl at this level sounds better but I prefer cds but alot of cds are mastered poorly with too much compression.
We are lucky these days with lossless formats like flac files.
 
Last edited:

No eye deer

Club Legend
Feb 11, 2012
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I found it on you tube.
That setup is worth 7k and sounds amazing but an enormous expense.
I’m glad he puts up the videos for all to enjoy.
This was my first ever listen to the album and I love it,bought it through Joni’s Amazon site on cd.
I think vinyl at this level sounds better but I prefer cds but alot of cds are mastered poorly with too much compression.
We are lucky these days with lossless formats like flac files.
I’m a vinyl fan through and through, love the sound, compared to digital. The point I’m getting at is do you lose that 7 grands worth of quality by listening through you tube. Does it help the end sound when streaming?
 

smasha

πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…
Sep 7, 2003
46,231
53,104
Richmond Paddock
AFL Club
Richmond
I’m a vinyl fan through and through, love the sound, compared to digital. The point I’m getting at is do you lose that 7 grands worth of quality by listening through you tube. Does it help the end sound when streaming?
No,you are correct,you tube compresses the sound especially at lower bit rates.
 

CliffMcTainshaw

Club Legend
Apr 11, 2015
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Cill Chainnigh
This is Yvette Young who has a very unique tapping playing style. This is a very complex and heavy song. Her bass player sounds like he modelled his playing style on Chris Squire from Yes.

This song is a lot milder but gives an idea of her playing skills compared to the first song.
 

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CliffMcTainshaw

Club Legend
Apr 11, 2015
2,619
2,946
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Hawthorn
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Cill Chainnigh
I found it on you tube.
That setup is worth 7k and sounds amazing but an enormous expense.
I’m glad he puts up the videos for all to enjoy.
This was my first ever listen to the album and I love it,bought it through Joni’s Amazon site on cd.
I think vinyl at this level sounds better but I prefer cds but alot of cds are mastered poorly with too much compression.
We are lucky these days with lossless formats like flac files.
One reason "The Hissing of the Summer Lawns" sounds so good is because it was recorded in 1975, well before compression became a big problem.
Honestly the only thing I miss about Vinyl are the Album covers.
As far as listening goes, CD’s are far better. No surface noise, no clicks and pops. Vinyl has a much lower dynamic range.
Vinyl has limitations because of groove size. Very low frequencies are removed before pressing because otherwise grooves become too wide and restrict the amount recording time on the record. CD’s can achieve much longer recording times.
High frequencies make it difficult for the stylus to follow the grooves which causes distortion. Extremes of either high or low frequencies are either removed or reduced for Vinyl. CD’s have their high frequency limited to 20KHz, but very few adults can hear that high.
CD compression has become a real problem that started in the 90’s and has got worse since then, however, there has been a concerted push against it by some sound engineers over the last decade. The sort of compression problems that CD's are suffering couldn't happen on Vinyl simply because the stylus would continually jump out of the groove.
If CD’s are compressed, it is to do with the idea among record companies, their trained recording engineers and artists, that louder is better and sells better, (never mind that it only seems louder because there are no quieter passages to compare the loud passages to - just think of the advertisements on TV) and the uneducated music tastes of the current generation of music listeners.
The really big concern apart from sound quality is the damage that may be being caused to the ears of our kids by highly compressed music.
Audio engineer Matt Mayfield has said "When there is no quiet, there can be no loud."
The following Youtube videos explain the problem far better than I can.
 
Last edited:

smasha

πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…πŸ…
Sep 7, 2003
46,231
53,104
Richmond Paddock
AFL Club
Richmond
One reason "The Hissing of the Summer Lawns" sounds so good is because it was recorded in 1975, well before compression became a big problem.
Honestly the only thing I miss about Vinyl are the Album covers.
As far as listening goes, CD’s are far better. No surface noise, no clicks and pops. Vinyl has a much lower dynamic range.
Vinyl has limitations because of groove size. Very low frequencies are removed before pressing because otherwise grooves become too wide and restrict the amount recording time on the record. CD’s can achieve much longer recording times.
High frequencies make it difficult for the stylus to follow the grooves which causes distortion. Extremes of either high or low frequencies are either removed or reduced for Vinyl. CD’s have their high frequency limited to 20KHz, but very few adults can hear that high.
CD compression has become a real problem that started in the 90’s and has got worse since then, however, there has been a concerted push against it by some sound engineers over the last decade. The sort of compression problems that CD's are suffering couldn't happen on Vinyl simply because the stylus would continually jump out of the groove.
If CD’s are compressed, it is to do with the idea among record companies, their trained recording engineers and artists, that louder is better and sells better, (never mind that it only seems louder because there are no quieter passages to compare the loud passages to - just think of the advertisements on TV) and the uneducated music tastes of the current generation of music listeners.
The really big concern apart from sound quality is the damage that may be being caused to the ears of our kids by highly compressed music.
Audio engineer Matt Mayfield has said "When there is no quiet, there can be no loud."
The following Youtube videos explain the problem far better than I can.
Nail on head.
For vinyl to shine you need a micro line or shibata stylus as these don’t introduce Inner Groove Distortion when the needle does it’s hardest job ,staying in the groove near the end of a side.

But prepare to pay a minmum of 200 aud for one of these,prices have skyrocketed since the boom of vinyl.

With cds,I usually buy the orignials or the older masters not the new ones,because some can be overly compressed.

1975 seems to be a sweet spot for audio quality and the years around it but I love the period 74 to 79 for audio quality.

Before big boomy reverb snares and cheesy keyboard sounds came in.

Little Feat’s The Last Record Album recorded in 1975 has a magnificent audio quality as well.
 

No eye deer

Club Legend
Feb 11, 2012
1,483
3,397
The Top End
AFL Club
Fremantle
One reason "The Hissing of the Summer Lawns" sounds so good is because it was recorded in 1975, well before compression became a big problem.
Honestly the only thing I miss about Vinyl are the Album covers.
As far as listening goes, CD’s are far better. No surface noise, no clicks and pops. Vinyl has a much lower dynamic range.
Vinyl has limitations because of groove size. Very low frequencies are removed before pressing because otherwise grooves become too wide and restrict the amount recording time on the record. CD’s can achieve much longer recording times.
High frequencies make it difficult for the stylus to follow the grooves which causes distortion. Extremes of either high or low frequencies are either removed or reduced for Vinyl. CD’s have their high frequency limited to 20KHz, but very few adults can hear that high.
CD compression has become a real problem that started in the 90’s and has got worse since then, however, there has been a concerted push against it by some sound engineers over the last decade. The sort of compression problems that CD's are suffering couldn't happen on Vinyl simply because the stylus would continually jump out of the groove.
If CD’s are compressed, it is to do with the idea among record companies, their trained recording engineers and artists, that louder is better and sells better, (never mind that it only seems louder because there are no quieter passages to compare the loud passages to - just think of the advertisements on TV) and the uneducated music tastes of the current generation of music listeners.
The really big concern apart from sound quality is the damage that may be being caused to the ears of our kids by highly compressed music.
Audio engineer Matt Mayfield has said "When there is no quiet, there can be no loud."
The following Youtube videos explain the problem far better than I can.
Nail on head.
For vinyl to shine you need a micro line or shibata stylus as these don’t introduce Inner Groove Distortion when the needle does it’s hardest job ,staying in the groove near the end of a side.

But prepare to pay a minmum of 200 aud for one of these,prices have skyrocketed since the boom of vinyl.

With cds,I usually buy the orignials or the older masters not the new ones,because some can be overly compressed.

1975 seems to be a sweet spot for audio quality and the years around it but I love the period 74 to 79 for audio quality.

Before big boomy reverb snares and cheesy keyboard sounds came in.

Little Feat’s The Last Record Album recorded in 1975 has a magnificent audio quality as well.
Well it’s hard to argue against all that!

But, to me, my ears and my cheap arsed setup, vinyl is king. I don’t mind the clicks and pops.
Maybe it’s the romantic in me. Thought my Mrs will tell you I’m the most unromantic person going around!

In saying that, I rarely spin CDs these days, everything is on iTunes.

Oh yeah, Smasha, got that one on vinyl! Love the Feat!

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