Movie What's the last movie you saw? (5)

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Richard Cranium

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It does but it strikes me as a movie that is trying to look visually amazing rather than trying to have a good storyline and substance

Lebron James has his kid stolen by some matrix type guy. Matrix type guys says he can only get his kid back if he picks a team full of losers to beat his team of superstars in a basketball game. Lebron wins yawn
Glad I'm not the only one who thought this. First one at least had some thought put into how MJ gets involved. New one doesn't seem to even bother coming up with a reason for any game to happen at all.
 

GreyCrow

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Soylent Green (1973) - Netflix

Directed by Richard Fleischer

This has aged terribly. Set in 2022 New York city it looks old

In a future where New York city has 40m people and 20m of them are unemployed the food situation is grim. Luckily Soylent is available

Charlton Heston plays a cop assigned to a murder in the high class neighbourhood - Edward G Robinson ( last movie role) plays his mentor/sidekick. Heston wont be deterred from finding the murderer and finds himself in deep water.

In a prescient moment the sight of people in masks in New York 2022 was a highlight.

I'm not sure where the issues lie but there are issues. Whether its bad acting, badly written or unsure of its role ie is it a cop movie or a sci-fi movie - because it fails at both.

Trying to recall the message at the time but I felt it was about mass food production because there was a change from home cooked meals of products brought at the stores in season - to the automated frozen meals -

By the 1970s, competition among the frozen food giants spurred some menu innovation, including such questionable options as Swanson’s take on a “Polynesian Style Dinner,” which doesn’t resemble any meal you will see in Polynesia. Tastemakers, of course, sniffed, like the New York Times food critic who observed in 1977 that TV dinner consumers had no taste. But perhaps that was never the main draw. “In what other way can I get...a single serving of turkey, a portion of dressing...and the potatoes, vegetable and dessert...[for] something like 69 cents?” a Shrewsbury, New Jersey, newspaper quoted one reader as saying. TV dinners had found another niche audience in dieters, who were glad for the built-in portion control.

And takeaway ie McDonalds and Burger King and KFC

The problem was this message wasnt explored as fully as it could have been

If it wasnt for the last minute twist at the end it would have no place in history
 

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Judd2Sewell

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The 80s is comfortably my least favourite decade of films, as unpopular as that is.

I've recorded 700 film ratings over the last 10 years and films of that decade are considerably lower than any other.

I just don't get the fascination.
I imagine it's because you are, in fact, a soulless robot. Just kidding.

As a 34 year old those movies hold a very special place in my heart after watching them as a youngster growing up. I don't know how old you are, but it could be a generational thing?
 

RobbyRoy

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The 80s is comfortably my least favourite decade of films, as unpopular as that is.

I've recorded 700 film ratings over the last 10 years and films of that decade are considerably lower than any other.

I just don't get the fascination.
Comfortably the worst decade in my view as well, but there are still plenty of great movies.
 

JackOutback

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It was a great decade for action (Arnie and Sly, Die Hard etc) and action comedies (Indiana Jones, Back to the Future, Ghostbusters). In terms of dramatic quality, it might not top other decades, but in terms of producing people's favourite films, it has a high strike rate.
 

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spinynorman

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The 80s is comfortably my least favourite decade of films, as unpopular as that is.

I've recorded 700 film ratings over the last 10 years and films of that decade are considerably lower than any other.

I just don't get the fascination.
Such a drop in quality from the 1970s, a contender for the greatest decade in cinema of all. And planted many of the seeds for the problems in cinema today (to be fair, this isn’t just a cinematic or cultural issue and is tied to a much bigger and wider sociopolitical issue, but the point stands).
 

Quokka

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Godzilla vs Kong,

When Godzilla fighting King Kong is the most believable part of your movie, the part that grounds it, then you may be doing movies wrong.
 
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EFC 1871

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I imagine it's because you are, in fact, a soulless robot. Just kidding.

As a 34 year old those movies hold a very special place in my heart after watching them as a youngster growing up. I don't know how old you are, but it could be a generational thing?
I'm 33, so I dont think it's that.

I love films from the 50s, 60s and 70s, and have some childhood favourites from the 90s and 00s - but with the exception of a few old favourites, I just don't connect with the 80s era.
 

phantom13

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34 year old, 80s and early 90s action are like comfort food.

I’d tend to agree that quality dramas from the 80s are take or leave, action and comedy for my generation from then is top shelf stuff.

Early 00s wasn’t great for drama either and I’d say in 20 years time the pandemic era where nothing got released is gonna look weird.
 

raskolnikov

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The 80s was awesome for horror.

The Shining
A Nightmare on Elm St
Poltergeist
Child's Play
Friday the 13th
Halloween
Sleepaway Camp
Gremlins
The Fly

As a teenager in the 80s I loved these movies. For any other genre it was pretty thin though there were a few great movies.

Witness
War Games
The Colour Purple
Indiana Jones triology
Dead Poets Society
Terminator
The Naked Gun
Full Metal Jacket
Never Ending Story
The Princess Bride
Predator
The Goonies
Flying High
Raging Bull
E.T.
Back to the Future
Aliens
 

sorted

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About Endlessness - the Swedish director Roy Andersson's fourth feature in twenty years featuring the same style of visual poetry, each adding up to an overall theme, is possibly his most beautiful yet. Each scene is a static shot of what could pass for a stillwork in a gallery, with performers filling the frame for a range of different vignettes, with a range of different characters and only a handful ever returning for what could possibly be called a plot. The tone of each scene varies dramatically, from the comedic to the cathartic to the surreal to the disturbing, and some of the jumps to the next scene are startling. From the priest struggling with his loss of faith to the grudges held between two middle aged men reunited after falling out decades earlier, there is much in this that will stay with me for some time. Only 76 minutes long, there was a lot to take in, and Andersson remains one of the truly unique film makers today.
Thanks for the tip. I watched this today.

Each scene is both mundane yet intriguing, bleak and also beautiful. It's not all set in Sweden but it all has that depressive Northern European feel from living under low clouds. Winston Churchill once said “We shape our buildings and thereafter our buildings shape us". The landscape and climate can shape people too. I was thinking a movie with a similar concept but set in Australia would be very different.

On viewing, I didn't try to see any deeper meanings in it, just observe like watching moving paintings in a gallery. Then you think about it later. The priest who has lost his faith. The psychiatrist first tells him "I can help you but I don't do this for free". Next visit the shrink tells him "Come back next week, I have to catch my bus". It highlights the existential crisis - are we alone in this world and life is pointless? There's sufficient variety of other characters that you can find other meanings. I could relate to the guy in the bar who was telling people "Isn't it all fantastic" but no one was listening.

As for endlessness, I would rather be a tomato than a potato but hopefully there are other options.
 

Shell

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I just.... this was just so ******* bad- low budget, uneven performances, laugh out loud moments when clearly it was not meant to be comedic and i legit was going to turn it off 10 minutes in.


In glad i didnt this was the ******* best sh*t ive ever seen 10/10 :tearsofjoy: :thumbsupv1:
 

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