Movie What's the last movie you saw? (7)

Remove this Banner Ad

Robot Dreams, an award-winning Spanish/French animated feature about the friendship between a dog and his robot in Manhattan.
Funny, sad, very entertaining... and you'll be humming Earth, Wind & Fire's soul classic September for days.

 
Saw both Anatomy of a Fall and American Fiction over the weekend.

Anatomy of a Fall was incredibly gripping and a joy to watch so many actors on screen just completely in the zone. Loved it. Close runner up to May December for best movies of the last year.

American Fiction was a nice comedy/drama that made for an easy watch. Engaging from start to finish.
 

Log in to remove this ad.

Anatomy of a Fall - really excellent film, and would be my second choice of the Best Picture nominees after Killers of the Flower Moon. Maybe the wildest court hearing I've ever seen in film and makes me wonder why the French don't have more courtroom dramas given the civil law system is apparently so much more wild than our common law one.

Two films by Stan Brakhage. Brakhage was an experimental director who was a major figure in arthouse circles from the mid-1950s until his death in 2003. I'd seen quite a few of his films from the 1950s, but oddly nothing after 1959's Window Water Baby Moving, where he began to really reach his acclaim. His films were usually silent and included a number of notable experimental techniques such as fast cutting and multiple exposure - cutting edge but not to everyone's taste.

Mothlight (1963) - only three and a half minutes long, Brakhage made this film without a camera, inventing an entire new film technique. He collected moth wings, flower petals and blades of grass and pressed them between two strips of 16mm tape, before printing onto film so it could be run through a projector. The resulting collage film is a cool concept, no doubt, but obviously won't work for everyone, but I enjoyed it as a reflection on the beauty of life.

Dog Star Man (1964) - Brakhage's magnum opus is actually five films, a prologue and then parts one to four. A man and his dog slowly climb a snowy mountain in order to cut down a tree. Along the way, images permeate the screen, featuring birth, cells and the cosmos. It's all quite epic in scope (and, I must say, his most visually beautiful of all his films that I've seen) and I wonder to what extent, if any, it inspired Kubrick four years later.
 
Watched Killers of the Flower Moon last night. Really enjoyed it right up until the radio play at the end. I found it quite jarring and.. I'm struggling for the right word but kind of disrespectful to the real story they'd just spent 3+ hours telling. I get that the radio play was probably an actual event too but I didn't really appreciate all the 'look how they made this sound effect on the radio!!' stuff. Then again maybe it was a commentary on how serious matters were/are often reduced to pure entertainment. I dunno. I just found it an odd ending. Would have just preferred the old text on the screen to wrap it up. Maybe over the Indians dancing drone shot.
 
Then again maybe it was a commentary on how serious matters were/are often reduced to pure entertainment. I dunno. I just found it an odd ending. Would have just preferred the old text on the screen to wrap it up.
I think you're on the money here. I also read it as Martin Scorsese addressing that he is a white (Italian) guy telling the story, and acknowledging that this affluent entertainment culture is the context from which he is telling it.

I thought it was a very interesting and clever way to finish it, if for no other reason than it was something I had never seen before.
 
Basically was halfway through writing the same as above when I saw it was posted.

I found Scorsese's appearance very moving.

And even if it wasn't the artist trying to reconcile with how he'd taken this story of enormous evil and tragedy and presented it as entertainment, I'm pretty over the text on screen, which is so overdone.
 
Yeah I thought it was a really excellent reflection by Marty that he probably has some guilt about. Another sign of this was ensuring that the DiCaprio character really had no redeeming qualities in him at all, apart from being borderline mentally challenged.
 
I'm pretty over the text on screen, which is so overdone.
Yeah true. I'm not sure what else they could have done but, as I said, I just found it very jarring. Instead of focusing on the story and the people all of a sudden I'm focusing on radio sound effects and is that Jack White? It looks like Jack White. It is Jack White! Hang on there's Marty too!
 
If you ever wondered what Johnny Castle did after having the time of his life with Baby, he became a bouncer at the Double Deuce. Yes, Road House great action flick with Swayze kicking ass in between reading philosophy. Tighe playing one if the few roles where he’s not a total POS, Gazzara doing his best impression of God-Emperor. Kelly Lynch nice eye candy and Sam Elliott looking more grizzled than moustachioed.
 
Anatomy of a Fall - really excellent film, and would be my second choice of the Best Picture nominees after Killers of the Flower Moon. Maybe the wildest court hearing I've ever seen in film and makes me wonder why the French don't have more courtroom dramas given the civil law system is apparently so much more wild than our common law one.

Two films by Stan Brakhage. Brakhage was an experimental director who was a major figure in arthouse circles from the mid-1950s until his death in 2003. I'd seen quite a few of his films from the 1950s, but oddly nothing after 1959's Window Water Baby Moving, where he began to really reach his acclaim. His films were usually silent and included a number of notable experimental techniques such as fast cutting and multiple exposure - cutting edge but not to everyone's taste.

Mothlight (1963) - only three and a half minutes long, Brakhage made this film without a camera, inventing an entire new film technique. He collected moth wings, flower petals and blades of grass and pressed them between two strips of 16mm tape, before printing onto film so it could be run through a projector. The resulting collage film is a cool concept, no doubt, but obviously won't work for everyone, but I enjoyed it as a reflection on the beauty of life.

Dog Star Man (1964) - Brakhage's magnum opus is actually five films, a prologue and then parts one to four. A man and his dog slowly climb a snowy mountain in order to cut down a tree. Along the way, images permeate the screen, featuring birth, cells and the cosmos. It's all quite epic in scope (and, I must say, his most visually beautiful of all his films that I've seen) and I wonder to what extent, if any, it inspired Kubrick four years later.

I remember, years ago in a doco class at latrobe doing Brakhage's THE ACT OF SEEING WITH ONE'S OWN EYES (1971) followed by Franju's BLOOD OF THE BEASTS (1949) and Resnais' NIGHT AND FOG (1956). There was no break inbetween. When we staggered out, into the daylight, one student fainted, another wept uncontrollably. After that I think those films were broken up into seperate classes.
 
Stan Helsing - 2009 on Prime/Paramount

In what was one of Leslie Nielsens last movies this is not a great finish to a career

It had promise and it should have been better. Like Airport and Scary Movie this throws out tropes and cliches scene after scene but is very unfunny

Dont bother
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

The Last Movie I saw was Se7en before I watched Saw 7 while also viewing 7th Heaven then I watched Seinfeld the episode called 7 while throwing away Fast-7 while I drank a can of soda called 7 ( up )
 
I remember, years ago in a doco class at latrobe doing Brakhage's THE ACT OF SEEING WITH ONE'S OWN EYES (1971) followed by Franju's BLOOD OF THE BEASTS (1949) and Resnais' NIGHT AND FOG (1956). There was no break inbetween. When we staggered out, into the daylight, one student fainted, another wept uncontrollably. After that I think those films were broken up into seperate classes.

Jesus, I know about The Act of Seeing with One’s Own Eyes and am not sure I can put myself through it. Why did they opt for a “most upsetting possible movies” week? Surely each of them warrants quiet reflection rather than being put back to back like a weird mondo thing.
 
Madame Web would have to be up there with the worst movies I've ever seen.
i've really enjoyed the cast basically trashing it constantly

doing the opposite of Jared Leto basically
 
Das Boot (1981 Written and directed by Wolfgang Peterson).

Set in Oct-Dec 1941 follows the trials and tribulations of a German U Boat crew. I loved the 1981 theatrical version of the film (149 minutes) in its original VHS but this is a whole different ball game. I watched the 308 minute 'full edition TV series' that is broken up into six 'episodes' so it has a similar feel to the Band of Brothers/Pacific event style series now. The effects are a bit dated now but the scenes inside the Submarine have lost none of their effectiveness. You truly feel the need to take a deep breath when the sub surfaces.

Not presently available in Australia unfortunately unless you import it or find a second hand copy somewhere. The box set has the Theatrical cut, Directors cut and Full tv series edition.

One of the all time great war dramas. 9/10
 
Killers of the flower moon

I’m really not sure how to review/critique this. It feels so painstakingly recreated and so carefully curated that it almost missed the part of being a film with a build and a plot and acts etc. which is not to say it’s not good, it is but I found it to be an incredibly tough slog and it felt every single second of its 3 hour plus run time. Which I suppose is part of the point. This event was ******* horribke and it went on and on for them and really, no one cared. To make it cinematic would have been a disservice to those who lived it.

So I suppose it’s a huge hats off to everyone involved for a film I thought was well done but not at all enjoyable and I’ll never watch again.
 
Last edited:

Remove this Banner Ad

Back
Top