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Society/Culture Why do less intelligent people gravitate to conservative/right wing ideology.

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Todman

Norm Smith Medallist
Aug 7, 2004
8,335
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I think there's some fear in there, too.

Think of it like this: if the point of a hierarchy is to ensure that power is left to the right people to use it - which I would argue is how right wingers see hierarchies, organic systems of merit in which those highest have 'earned' their position somehow - then any attempts to dismantle those hierarchies result in adverse outcomes. If a hierarchy is constructed to exclude black people, then that fear entails that not only would those black people be the incorrect people to give power to but they would then use the hierarchy to suit themselves; ie, newcomers to power would use their power precisely how those who've always had it do, to benefit themselves. Righteous power ceases to be righteous because there is not benefit for them, and is diluted by giving it to the wrong people who will use it in the wrong way.

It's racist, but it's also human nature through a right wing lens.
IN America , Gerrymandering is an accepted political tool used by both sides of the political divide.

The most famous case in Australia was in Queensland that kept Joh in power for nearly twenty years. Funny thing is that system was created by the Queensland Labor Party.

(From Wikipedia)

The malapportionment had been originally designed to favor rural areas in the 1930s-1950s by a Labor government who drew their support from agricultural and mine workers in rural areas. This helped Labor to stay in government from 1932–1957. As demographics and political views shifted over time, this system came to favor the Country Party instead.

The Country Party led by Frank Nicklin came to power in 1957, deciding to keep the malapportionment that favored them. In 1968, Joh Bjelke-Petersen became leader of the Country Party and Premier. In the 1970s, he further expanded the malapportionment and gerrymandering which then became known as the Bjelkemander. Under the system, electoral boundaries were drawn so that rural electorates had as few as half as many voters as metropolitan ones and regions with high levels of support for the Labor Party were concentrated into fewer electorates, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's government to remain in power for despite attracting substantially less than 50% of the vote.

In the 1986 election, for example, the National Party received 39.64% of the first preference vote and won 49 seats (in the 89 seat Parliament) whilst the Labor Opposition received 41.35% but won only 30 seats.[87] Bjelke-Petersen also used the system to disadvantage Liberal Party (traditionally allied with the Country Party) voters in urban areas, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's Country Party to rule alone, shunning the Liberals.
 

Gethelred

Moderator
May 1, 2016
28,026
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IN America , Gerrymandering is an accepted political tool used by both sides of the political divide.

The most famous case in Australia was in Queensland that kept Joh in power for nearly twenty years. Funny thing is that system was created by the Queensland Labor Party.

(From Wikipedia)

The malapportionment had been originally designed to favor rural areas in the 1930s-1950s by a Labor government who drew their support from agricultural and mine workers in rural areas. This helped Labor to stay in government from 1932–1957. As demographics and political views shifted over time, this system came to favor the Country Party instead.

The Country Party led by Frank Nicklin came to power in 1957, deciding to keep the malapportionment that favored them. In 1968, Joh Bjelke-Petersen became leader of the Country Party and Premier. In the 1970s, he further expanded the malapportionment and gerrymandering which then became known as the Bjelkemander. Under the system, electoral boundaries were drawn so that rural electorates had as few as half as many voters as metropolitan ones and regions with high levels of support for the Labor Party were concentrated into fewer electorates, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's government to remain in power for despite attracting substantially less than 50% of the vote.

In the 1986 election, for example, the National Party received 39.64% of the first preference vote and won 49 seats (in the 89 seat Parliament) whilst the Labor Opposition received 41.35% but won only 30 seats.[87] Bjelke-Petersen also used the system to disadvantage Liberal Party (traditionally allied with the Country Party) voters in urban areas, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's Country Party to rule alone, shunning the Liberals.
Whatabout...
 

Cap

TheBrownDog
Jul 27, 2004
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IN America , Gerrymandering is an accepted political tool used by both sides of the political divide.

The most famous case in Australia was in Queensland that kept Joh in power for nearly twenty years. Funny thing is that system was created by the Queensland Labor Party.

(From Wikipedia)

The malapportionment had been originally designed to favor rural areas in the 1930s-1950s by a Labor government who drew their support from agricultural and mine workers in rural areas. This helped Labor to stay in government from 1932–1957. As demographics and political views shifted over time, this system came to favor the Country Party instead.

The Country Party led by Frank Nicklin came to power in 1957, deciding to keep the malapportionment that favored them. In 1968, Joh Bjelke-Petersen became leader of the Country Party and Premier. In the 1970s, he further expanded the malapportionment and gerrymandering which then became known as the Bjelkemander. Under the system, electoral boundaries were drawn so that rural electorates had as few as half as many voters as metropolitan ones and regions with high levels of support for the Labor Party were concentrated into fewer electorates, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's government to remain in power for despite attracting substantially less than 50% of the vote.

In the 1986 election, for example, the National Party received 39.64% of the first preference vote and won 49 seats (in the 89 seat Parliament) whilst the Labor Opposition received 41.35% but won only 30 seats.[87] Bjelke-Petersen also used the system to disadvantage Liberal Party (traditionally allied with the Country Party) voters in urban areas, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's Country Party to rule alone, shunning the Liberals.
Yes , but the racists stuff being tried here is not allowed.

It's also interesting which parties do it more and which parties don't want to get rid of it.
 

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kranky al

Has NEVER sh@t himself in maccas
Jun 30, 2009
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east perth www.pixelpac.com.au
876B3DC4-9854-4775-9AA5-2854F11E5C16.jpeg
 

Spearman

Norm Smith Medallist
Sep 15, 2017
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you almost have to feel pity for those grifty MAGA influencers. They have to deal with never-ending voracious need for outragey content.
I mean seriously hanging up towels? Barbie? M&Ms?
Must be hard work.:rolleyes:
 

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Mofra

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IN America , Gerrymandering is an accepted political tool used by both sides of the political divide.

The most famous case in Australia was in Queensland that kept Joh in power for nearly twenty years. Funny thing is that system was created by the Queensland Labor Party.

(From Wikipedia)

The malapportionment had been originally designed to favor rural areas in the 1930s-1950s by a Labor government who drew their support from agricultural and mine workers in rural areas. This helped Labor to stay in government from 1932–1957. As demographics and political views shifted over time, this system came to favor the Country Party instead.

The Country Party led by Frank Nicklin came to power in 1957, deciding to keep the malapportionment that favored them. In 1968, Joh Bjelke-Petersen became leader of the Country Party and Premier. In the 1970s, he further expanded the malapportionment and gerrymandering which then became known as the Bjelkemander. Under the system, electoral boundaries were drawn so that rural electorates had as few as half as many voters as metropolitan ones and regions with high levels of support for the Labor Party were concentrated into fewer electorates, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's government to remain in power for despite attracting substantially less than 50% of the vote.

In the 1986 election, for example, the National Party received 39.64% of the first preference vote and won 49 seats (in the 89 seat Parliament) whilst the Labor Opposition received 41.35% but won only 30 seats.[87] Bjelke-Petersen also used the system to disadvantage Liberal Party (traditionally allied with the Country Party) voters in urban areas, allowing Bjelke-Petersen's Country Party to rule alone, shunning the Liberals.
False equivalence.
One party uses it far, far more than the other.
 

Cap

TheBrownDog
Jul 27, 2004
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“Alpha Male”:



Interesting reading the history of Nick Adams. Originally a Liberal councillor from Sydney he realised it was far more lucrative to grift and BS to gullible conservative Americans, therefore betrayed his country of origin and came out as MAGA.

To be fair, if rather them there than here.

1 trump supporter un Australia is 1 to many
 
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Ghost Patrol

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Sep 17, 2019
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Mofra

Moderator
Dec 6, 2005
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IN America , Gerrymandering is an accepted political tool used by both sides of the political divide.
Last gerrymandering was in 2010 in South Australia. Rann (ALP) won with 48 TPP.
I was responding to US politics as the first line of this earlier post.
In Australia, gerrymandering is extremely rare.

I doubt we will have to endure this sort of district boundary drawing in Australia, thankfully:

gerrymandered-districts-maps.png



a1d_puzzlegerrymanderedohio.jpeg


OIP.-8gykbDR116tXOZ2k2CKoQAAAA
 

Roby

Cancelled
Jul 27, 2008
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This forum has certainly opened my eyes over the past few years. And this comes from someone who initially voted for Morrison.
 

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