Covid-19 Wuhan Coronavirus (COVID-19) - Part 4 - Ivermectin doesn't work either.

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Marcel Proust

"Oohh WADA ooga booga" {Jul 11 2013}
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This bit was where I came in;




Wanting to 'live' is fine, but let's not pretend all the anti-vaxx / anti-pandemic / let it rip / just a flu / muh freedums types give a toss about anyone else's ability or right to live.
Interesting how you type mock freedom yet always hark bark to world war 2
 

SaintsSeptember

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PP34

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Our politicians, like everyone else, are bumbling along in a once in a 100 year pandemic. There’s no living precedent, and some have handled it better than others. You can pile onto them, but in truth they probably just want their pre covid lives back- for them and their families. I mean, who’d sign up for this sh*t?

Relax. You’ll get you freedoms back in a matter of months, or else he’ll be booted out at the next election.
Bullshit.

Come back to me in June next year when we are in lockdown 9 or some sh*t, day 300.
 

owen87

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Yes, let's be clear.

COVID-19 - 'CO' stands for corona, 'VI' for virus, 'D' for disease, '19' for 2019. It's a disease caused by a virus referred to as '2019 novel coronavirus' or '2019-nCoV.' or 'SARS-CoV-2'.

It is possible to be infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus but not develop any symptoms. For example, a study from Canada found that 35.9% of children who tested positive for the virus reported being asymptomatic. So those people are not 'diseased'. They don't have COVID-19.

Symptomatic illness from the virus ie 'having COVID-19', can range from a runny nose to flu-like symptoms, or life threatening complications for those with other serious conditions.

The vast majority of people exposed to this virus fight it off. Their immune system, that they were born with, responded by creating antibodies that healed them and gave them long term immunity. It's a natural process.

Whereas the vaccines use a very unnatural process which appear to give only short term immunity.
Yes I know how immune response works.

As I said.

You use the term 'natural immunity' very deliberately. Given your posting on the topic, I'm inclined not to give you the benefit of the doubt, and instead suggest that you're being deliberately misleading in your use of that.

No one reading this thread should take a single thing you write at face value.
 

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Crankyhawk

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Journalist : I had COVID. And I have monster immunity after eight months or so. I just got checked last month for antibodies.

Chris Croce, Pfizer Senior Associate Scientist: I mean that's no worries. Same thing with my brother.

Journalist : So should I get the vaccine?

Chris Croce : Wait.

Journalist : Until when?

Chris Croce : If your immunity starts to wane, then get vaccinated.

Journalist : So I'm well protected?

Chris Croce: Yeah

Journalist : Like as much as the vaccine.

Chris Croce : Probably more.

Journalist : How so? Like, how much more?

Chris Croce : I mean. So when we came out with, let's see. so right now, we're seeing and increase in the Delta variant. Mostly not because of the variant. Because of immune...their...basically...their antibodies are waning. So they're still protected, but not have that 95% efficacy. It's more like 70%. So you're being - you’re protected most likely for longer since there was a natural response.


Chris Croce: I mean, I still like I work for an evil corporation. So, basically, they're trying to keep track of everyone that's been vaccinated - versus the census of how many people are actually reported. So, I mean they're trying to get their numbers, but still you shouldn't have to show anything. Which is basically, in my opinion, a violation of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act - that protects civil rights). They - no one has the right to ask you if you've been vaccinated or so - it's an invasion of privacy. I don't agree with it. I mean you have multiple companies that were basically given a crap ton of money to produce vaccines and they're pushing them.


Journalist : So what happens to the monoclonal antibody treatments?

Chris Croce: Pushed to the side.

Journalist : Why?

Chris Croce: Money. It's disgusting. You're not wearing a wire, right?

I mean, I still feel like I work for an evil corporation 'cause it comes down to profits. In the end and I mean, I'm there to help people not make millions and millions of dollars. So I mean, that's the moral dilemma.

Journalist : I would say billions and billions.

Chris Croce: I'm trying to be nice!

Journalist : No, I hear you, I hear you, I do. I mean I'll still give you a hard time about it.

Chris Croce: Basically, our organization is run on COVID money now.

Journalist : How so?

Chris Croce: By it netted, like, over $15 billion last year. You don't talk about anything that can possibly implicate you, or like, Big Pharma. Even if you shut the door to the office, it's kind of like, who's listening?


Journalist : I'm glad you didn't get any myocarditis. Cause that's a concern, right?

Chris Croce: Yeah. More so for younger people.

Journalist : Why?

Chris Croce: That's what we're looking into right now. So, yeah, we're doing. We just sent, like, 3,000 patients' samples to get tested for, like, elevated troponin levels (risk of heart attack) to see if it's vaccine based - or so.

Journalist : What's it look like?

Chris Croce: I don't know. We just sent that over this past week. And the last batch will be sent over next week. All external testing. We'll see. Hopefully it's good. As I mean, if not then, in my opinion, that might pull something from the market.
Clinically the myocarditis I have seen (very few cases) has been a troponin rise without other significant symptoms (dizziness, hypotension, significant shortness of breath) and no intervention appears to be required. I’m not aware of any of these cases being out of cardiac transplant waiting lists.

And how does journalist go about getting antibody level tested? It’s not available in my hospital, how often would he need to get tested to check his levels are ok (and antibody levels ignore cell mediated component anyway so not sure how meaningful they are though am aware literature doesn’t use this as proxy marker)
 

Crankyhawk

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I can sort of accept that people who have already successfully recovered from COVID may not need the vaccine.

How do you apply that to a situation like Victoria is in at the moment.

Around 4% of HUME have had, or have got Covid19. Do you propose a " I caught Covid and didn't die " certificate?
Most other LGA's like Casey for example, have had less than half a percent of their population exposed.

You seem to be all in a tither because less than 1% of our population might have an unnecessary vaccine.
They sort of have that certificate- the dhs text message saying they are now covid clear
 

sorted

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Clinically the myocarditis I have seen (very few cases) has been a troponin rise without other significant symptoms (dizziness, hypotension, significant shortness of breath) and no intervention appears to be required. I’m not aware of any of these cases being out of cardiac transplant waiting lists.
The guy from Pfizer (Senior Associate Scientist) said they were looking into whether elevated troponin levels was vaccine based, particularly for younger people. And if confirmed, there's a risk that they 'might pull something from the market'. Maybe such tests should have been done before these experimental vaccines were implemented on hundreds of millions of people?

And how does journalist go about getting antibody level tested? It’s not available in my hospital, how often would he need to get tested to check his levels are ok (and antibody levels ignore cell mediated component anyway so not sure how meaningful they are though am aware literature doesn’t use this as proxy marker)
The validity of antibody tests are another part of the narrative.

The TGA has received and undertaken an expedited assessment of a number of applications for laboratory-based serology immunoassay tests and point-of-care (often referred to as PoC or PoCT) serology tests that utilise lateral flow immunoassay technology.​
Point-of-care serology tests are intended to detect IgG and/or IgM antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 from venous or finger prick blood samples that are placed on a test strip. These tests look similar to common pregnancy tests. Results take about 15–30 minutes.​
Serology antibody assays generally provide historic information about viral exposure. They can indicate whether an individual has past exposure to SARS-CoV-2. It is not yet evident that the detection of antibodies reflects the presence of protective immunity, so the detection of antibodies may not exclude remaining infectivity in a patient.​

The TGA has gone full bore on PCR tests to find positive 'cases' of SARS-CoV-2 but been very hesitant in finding that people have protective immunity.
 

sorted

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Yes I know how immune response works.

As I said.

You use the term 'natural immunity' very deliberately. Given your posting on the topic, I'm inclined not to give you the benefit of the doubt, and instead suggest that you're being deliberately misleading in your use of that.

No one reading this thread should take a single thing you write at face value.
You are just making personal attacks now without attempting to counter what I said.
 

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