Resource www.footyjumpers.com

Remove this Banner Ad

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,197
11,506
Vancouver, Canada
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
I played Ammos in the 80s
Mero I've been meaning to point this out all year, but never found a clear enough image. The 'Yes' wordmark on the Crows jumpers this year wasn't solid, it fades in and out, almost like a brushstroke. See below.
I've changed it, see the sponsors below, however it's so small it's difficult to see on the jumpers in the Uniforms images.
(Best section to refer to is the space between the e and the s that is now there.)
Home & Clash also done.
1634578274636.png

Adelaide-Sponsors-Backs2.gif
 
Last edited:

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,197
11,506
Vancouver, Canada
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
I played Ammos in the 80s
Also the names are on the back of all the jumpers as well. Mero
This is why I don't like to add the jumpers before they're used.
The original Crows artwork for the 2021 jumpers showed them with names on the front only.
I added all three jumpers to the site and considered them done.
Then, when they're actually used, they've got names on the backs.

That little cry over and done with, I've changed the three versions for 2021.

Thanks
 

Log in to remove this ad.

Smooth Criminal

Club Legend
Sep 18, 2016
2,227
3,842
Adelaide
AFL Club
Adelaide
I've changed it, see the sponsors below, however it's so small it's difficult to see on the jumpers in the Uniforms images.
(Best section to refer to is the space between the e and the s that is now there.)
Home & Clash also done.
View attachment 1263257
View attachment 1263258

Wrong O'Neills logo on the shorts and maybe the jock tag too.
Need to use the logo with the 1918 instead of the apostrophe, like under the collar.
 

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,197
11,506
Vancouver, Canada
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
I played Ammos in the 80s
I'm talking to Southern Cross Media about being a guest on a podcast, and it's related to why players wear sleeveless jumpers in Aussie Rules.
I have a standard history of footy jumpers thing I developed for kids who contact me for school project information.
I thought I would add it here:


When Australian Rules Football began in 1858, uniforms were a secondary consideration.
Most information we have from the period relates to other aspects, such as the rules, and how they are different from, and yet derived from the football played at Winchester, Harrow, and Rugby schools.
Some club records document what teams agreed to wear in certain games.
Melbourne appear to have worn cricket Whites for games, clubs such as Geelong agreed to wear Blue or Red shirts.
These would have been the sort of shirts people wore in every day life, and not specific to the sporting field.
In 1864 the first documented evidence for specific sporting uniforms is the order of Blue and Red stockings (socks) for Carlton and Melbourne Football Clubs.
Carlton had only just been formed, and Melbourne had existed since 1858.
Also around this time there is evidence that players were more likely to be wearing jumpers than shirts.
Melbourne did not have the industrial infrastructure to supply sporting outerwear, so all jumpers at this time had to be imported.
The Channel Islands of Guernsey & Jersey were the Commonwealth's main source of knitted material, having catered to the sea-faring industries of fishing and navy.
Guernsey jumpers were made with a looser knit, and heavier weight, Jerseys were a tighter knit, and lighter weight.
These types of jumpers were named for the style produced by the island they were made in, so a Guernsey is heavier weight jumper.
Given most imports into Australia at the time were destined for the goldfields, the warmer Guernseys were predominant, and therefore these became the jumper of choice in Melbourne, and in turn on the sporting fields of Melbourne.
When the wool was dyed with Navy Blue dye, the waterproof capability of lanolin in the wool was retained.
Other dyes stripped the lanolin from the wool.
Therefore, to make a waterproof jumper, Navy Blue was the overwhelming colour of choice for Guernseys and Jerseys.
The other option was to not dye the wool at all, and so we also see Blue and White Guernseys.
Canvas jumpers made their first appearance in the 1870s.
These were a tougher material, and could stand the rigours of the tackling, common in Australian Football, better than the wool Guernseys.
The other benefit of canvas lace-ups was they could be dyed in different colours, so clubs didn't have to wear Blue or Blue & White.
There was usually a leather reinforcing strip down the middle and across the shoulders, and these were often dyed in contrasting colours.
Melbourne dyed their strip Red, on a Blue lace-up. Carlton dyed theirs White. Fitzroy dyed their Yellow.
The laces were made of leather, which was also sometimes dyed.
Canvas Lace-up jumpers were the popular choice for the next 40 years.
Around the early 1900s manufacturing in Melbourne had progressed to the point where woolen jumpers, made from Australian Merino wool had become useful as an alternative to the uncomfortable canvas lace-up jumpers.
By 1910 all clubs in the VFL were predominantly wearing woolen jumpers.
These were long sleeve jumpers, and taller players would cut the sleeves off their jumpers.
This was due to ruck contests, where their opponent would grab their arm to hold them down.
With no sleeve, it was more difficult to grab the ruckman's arm.
Some clubs had their players all wear sleeveless to give the impression of being capable of competing in a ruck contest, and were therefore taller.
This is the origin of the expression "Collingwood 6-footer".
Collingwood's success through the late 1920s meant other clubs copied them.
It was a generally accepted 'rule of thumb' that long sleeve jumpers would be worn on wet days, and sleeveless on dry days.
Given football is a winter's sport, long sleeve jumpers were predominantly used right up to the late 1950's-early 1960s.
Melbourne experienced lower the normal rainfall across 1957 to 1968, and this may explain why more and more players wore sleeveless jumpers.
(This culminated in the 1965-68 Drought)
Wool jumpers were the prevailing style until the development of synthetic fibres in the late 1960s.
At time acrylic became the fibre of choice, thought the style was the same as the woolen versions.
Acrylic was water resistant, and the jumpers were lighter, and especially so in wet weather.
Printed (sublimated) polyester/wool blend shirts had been successful in European soccer from the late 1980s.
However, the fabric was thought to be too light for the rigours of Australian Football.
A heavier weight version was developed, and in the preseason of 1995 we saw the first of the sublimated jumpers on polyester blend.
These styles have only changed in the templates they are made in, with the jumpers becoming more fitted to each player.
 
Last edited:

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,197
11,506
Vancouver, Canada
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
I played Ammos in the 80s
My current area of research is into the reasons for canvas lace-up jumpers in the 1870s.
It is my contention that canvas was over-supplied, and local companies who had imported it for the purposes of providing tents (mostly for the goldfields) had to create additional markets for their product.

What we know:
Canvas was not made in Australia, it was being imported from England to Melbourne.
Sailings took 6 months. (Think of the Split Enz song if you're old enough)
That meant the order went from Melbourne to Northern England, the order was made, then transported to Liverpool, then shipped to Melbourne.
The process of ordering canvas would have taken around 18 months from the time the order was first placed.

The population of Melbourne surged from the mid 1850s to the late 1860s as news of Victoria's goldfields reached the world.

Construction of more permanent structures (wood & stone) was by then available, meaning tents were required less.

1873 saw the club delegates agree that players should wear knickerbockers & stockings (socks) of the same colour as each other.
1875 saw the introduction of The Footballer which documents the club's details, mentioning Guernseys in 1875 and Jerseys from 1876.

The Footballer:
1875: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM2PmyHxF4RyTi0vg?e=MdjabR
1876: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM0uWjvkgxUVLr3Ug?e=8PKflK
1877: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM3X1XQ9raSXPOTSw?e=aoDGfV
1878: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM1geSOptZ4S4CKvg?e=jQbqpS
1879: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhZ4YdCLfKfjQE7Gd1g?e=YLMu7n

Sydney winter sports (Rugby & Soccer) never adopted lace-up jumpers.

Canvas, which arrives un-dyed & White, would be easier to dye locally than Guernseys that were traditionally Navy Blue and would have arrived in that colour.
Colours listed in The Footballer include: Blue, Blue & White Stripes, Red & White Stripes, Rose & Black Stripes, Black & Blue Stripes, Blue & Red Stripes and Black & Red Stripes (Stripes being what we would call Hoops today).Canvas is also easier to 'embellish. Red lace reinforcing on Melbourne's jumper, Red sash on Essendon's or the White shoulder reinforcing on Carlton's made for variations in design. You could even say stripes would be easier on canvas when compared to wool.


Having said all that, I can't find a link that categorically says football 'jerseys' were made of canvas because there was plenty of canvas available, and/or canvas suppliers were looking for alternative markets to sell their canvas. But I think it makes the most sense.
 
Last edited:

(Log in to remove this ad.)

SJ

Premium Platinum
May 22, 2006
33,154
16,318
Melbourne
AFL Club
Geelong
My current area of research is into the reasons for canvas lace-up jumpers in the 1870s.
It is my contention that canvas was over-supplied, and local companies who had imported it for the purposes of providing tents (mostly for the goldfields) had to create additional markets for their product.

What we know:
Canvas was not made in Australia, it was being imported from England to Melbourne.
Sailings took 6 months. (Think of the Split Enz song if you're old enough)
That meant the order went from Melbourne to Northern England, the order was made, then transported to Liverpool, then shipped to Melbourne.
The process of ordering canvas would have taken around 18 months from the time the order was first placed.

The population of Melbourne surged from the mid 1850s to the late 1860s as news of Victoria's goldfields reached the world.

Construction of more permanent structures (wood & stone) was by then available, meaning tents were required less.

1873 saw the club delegates agree that players should wear knickerbockers & stockings (socks) of the same colour as each other.
1875 saw the introduction of The Footballer which documents the club's details, mentioning Guernseys in 1875 and Jerseys from 1876.

The Footballer:
1875: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM2PmyHxF4RyTi0vg?e=MdjabR
1876: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM0uWjvkgxUVLr3Ug?e=8PKflK
1877: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM3X1XQ9raSXPOTSw?e=aoDGfV
1878: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhbM1geSOptZ4S4CKvg?e=jQbqpS
1879: https://1drv.ms/b/s!Ak4FHnTjWwzmhZ4YdCLfKfjQE7Gd1g?e=YLMu7n

Sydney winter sports (Rugby & Soccer) never adopted lace-up jumpers.

Canvas, which arrives un-dyed & White, would be easier to dye locally than Guernseys that were traditionally Navy Blue and would have arrived in that colour.
Colours listed in The Footballer include: Blue, Blue & White Stripes, Red & White Stripes, Rose & Black Stripes, Black & Blue Stripes, Blue & Red Stripes and Black & Red Stripes (Stripes being what we would call Hoops today).Canvas is also easier to 'embellish. Red lace reinforcing on Melbourne's jumper, Red sash on Essendon's or the White shoulder reinforcing on Carlton's made for variations in design. You could even say stripes would be easier on canvas when compared to wool.


Having said all that, I can't find a link that categorically says football 'jerseys' were made of canvas because there was plenty of canvas available, and/or canvas suppliers were looking for alternative markets to sell their canvas. But I think it makes the most sense.
Very plausible. Fascinating. Was canvas used for any other apparel at the time? I can’t imagine it was very comfortable.
 

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,197
11,506
Vancouver, Canada
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
I played Ammos in the 80s
Very plausible. Fascinating. Was canvas used for any other apparel at the time? I can’t imagine it was very comfortable.
Well that's the thing, I can't find another use for it.
Tents... footy jumpers....signs maybe?...and ...yeah that's about it.
 

TheBillABCTV

Debutant
Oct 4, 2021
110
26
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
Well that's the thing, I can't find another use for it.
Tents... footy jumpers....signs maybe?...and ...yeah that's about it.
Mero is awesome person, he made custom one for all 18 AFL Clubs in the Australian Winter. I will share how I would have all 18 AFL Clubs wear.
Here is Adelaide crows. Here is Brisbane Lions, Carlton and Collingwood.
 

Attachments

  • Adelaide-Crows-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Adelaide-Crows-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    122 KB · Views: 67
  • Brisbane-Lions HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back with BBFFC on back1.png
    Brisbane-Lions HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back with BBFFC on back1.png
    110.4 KB · Views: 71
  • Brisbane-Lions HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back with BBFFC on back2.png
    Brisbane-Lions HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back with BBFFC on back2.png
    109.4 KB · Views: 66
  • Brisbane-Lions HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back with BBFFC on back3.png
    Brisbane-Lions HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back with BBFFC on back3.png
    112.9 KB · Views: 60
  • Carlton-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Carlton-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    71.6 KB · Views: 57
  • Collingwood-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Collingwood-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    72.7 KB · Views: 55

TheBillABCTV

Debutant
Oct 4, 2021
110
26
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
Mero is awesome person, he made custom one for all 18 AFL Clubs in the Australian Winter. I will share how I would have all 18 AFL Clubs wear.
Here is Adelaide crows. Here is Brisbane Lions, Carlton and Collingwood.
Here we have Essendon, Fremantle, Geelong and Gold Coast Suns on how I would have each club wear.
 

Attachments

  • Essendon-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Essendon-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    76.5 KB · Views: 48
  • Fremantle-Dockers-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back Jason 2.png
    Fremantle-Dockers-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back Jason 2.png
    108.3 KB · Views: 58
  • Geelong-HomeAway-Uniforms2021BackNavyBlueHomeone .png
    Geelong-HomeAway-Uniforms2021BackNavyBlueHomeone .png
    84.3 KB · Views: 53
  • Gold Coast-Suns-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Gold Coast-Suns-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    92.2 KB · Views: 53

TheBillABCTV

Debutant
Oct 4, 2021
110
26
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
Here we have Essendon, Fremantle, Geelong and Gold Coast Suns on how I would have each club wear.
Here is GWS, Hawthorn, Melbourne and North Melbourne in my custom ones. I thank Rob for all these.
 

Attachments

  • GWS-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    GWS-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    84.8 KB · Views: 46
  • Hawthorn HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Hawthorn HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    90.3 KB · Views: 50
  • Melbourne-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Melbourne-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    65.1 KB · Views: 53
  • North Melbourne-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back1.png
    North Melbourne-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back1.png
    88.2 KB · Views: 51

TheBillABCTV

Debutant
Oct 4, 2021
110
26
AFL Club
Port Adelaide
Here is GWS, Hawthorn, Melbourne and North Melbourne in my custom ones. I thank Rob for all these.
Here is the Custom ones for Port Adelaide, Richmond, St kilda, Sydney, West Coast and Western Bulldogs. Enjoy everyone. Thank you Rob.

The PAFC ones are: Black versions, white version and sky blue version for all games against Collingwood.
 

Attachments

  • Port Adelaide-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back in all bars design  .png
    Port Adelaide-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back in all bars design .png
    118 KB · Views: 70
  • Richmond-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back 0.png
    Richmond-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back 0.png
    71.8 KB · Views: 64
  • Richmond-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back 1.png
    Richmond-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back 1.png
    72.8 KB · Views: 54
  • StKilda-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    StKilda-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    68.3 KB · Views: 58
  • Sydney-Swans-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Sydney-Swans-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    87 KB · Views: 67
  • West Coast HomeAway-Uniforms2021BackSuggestion for West Coast Eagles.png
    West Coast HomeAway-Uniforms2021BackSuggestion for West Coast Eagles.png
    103.6 KB · Views: 71
  • Western Bulldogs-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    Western Bulldogs-HomeAway-Uniforms2021Back.png
    77.9 KB · Views: 63
Last edited:

Smooth Criminal

Club Legend
Sep 18, 2016
2,227
3,842
Adelaide
AFL Club
Adelaide
1636513554787.png

1636513409014.png

1636513369314.png

Cuffs missing on the back renders, and for the last guernsey the jock tag was moved further to the right almost past the stitching avoid clashing with the names
1636513977590.png
 

Smooth Criminal

Club Legend
Sep 18, 2016
2,227
3,842
Adelaide
AFL Club
Adelaide
Also North home was still white in 2015
1636514528435.png

Should be this instead, but you need to fix the spacing between the Canterbury logo and the mid stripe because the spacing was huge in 2015 unlike 2016-2021. And AFL logo on jock tag seems to have died on your picture there too
1636514661895.png

1636514782780.png
 

Attachments

  • 1636514531627.png
    1636514531627.png
    273.3 KB · Views: 19

Liam Boy

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 12, 2008
6,014
10,013
Melbourne
AFL Club
North Melbourne
extremely minor nitpick for you mero, on north's indigenous guernseys page you've spelled Tarisse King's name "Tarrise"
 

Remove this Banner Ad

Remove this Banner Ad