Ancient Australia (Extinct Megafauna, Dinosaurs etc) | Page 2 | BigFooty

Ancient Australia (Extinct Megafauna, Dinosaurs etc)

Discussion in 'Science' started by CD Xbow, May 23, 2017.

  1. Wizard17

    Wizard17 Brownlow Medallist

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    Can't see any barbules on the feather so probably not from an animal that flies. Looks like it is from a theropodic (avian) dino maybe but I'm not expert.

    going by the article Qantassaurus is probably the likely suspect for the non avian feather
     

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  2. CD Xbow

    CD Xbow Club Legend

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    Certainly could be a non avian therapod. I haven't been able to find an image of the most 'simple' feather. The feathered ornithopods from northern hemisphere dinos have had a few different types of feather, clever Kulindadromeus had three, from wikipedia:

    "The feather remains discovered are of three types, adding a level of complexity to the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs.[2]The first type consists of hair-like filaments covering the trunk, neck and head. These are up to three centimetres long and resemble the stage 1 "dino-fuzz" already known from theropods like Sinosauropteryx. The second type is represented by groups of six or seven downwards-projecting filaments up to 1.5 centimetres long, originating from a base plate. These are present on the upper arm and thigh. They resemble the type 3 feathers of theropods. The base plates are ordered in a hexagonal pattern but do not touch each other. The third type is unique. It was found on the upper lower legs and consists of bundles of six or seven ribbon-like structures, up to two centimetres long. Each ribbon is constructed from about ten parallel filaments up to 0.1 millimetres wide"
     
  3. Wizard17

    Wizard17 Brownlow Medallist

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    Considering that Australia was closer to the south pole in the Cretaceous it wouldn't be too far fetched to expect our Ornithopods to have had some sort of insulating feathers. Actually would expect it. Same goes with Avian Theropods like Australovenator.
     
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