Ancient Australia (Extinct Megafauna, Dinosaurs etc) | Page 2 | BigFooty

Ancient Australia (Extinct Megafauna, Dinosaurs etc)

Discussion in 'Science' started by CD Xbow, May 23, 2017.

  1. Wizard17

    Wizard17 Brownlow Medallist

    Western Bulldogs
    Joined:
    Sep 13
    Posts:
    10,112
    Can't see any barbules on the feather so probably not from an animal that flies. Looks like it is from a theropodic (avian) dino maybe but I'm not expert.

    going by the article Qantassaurus is probably the likely suspect for the non avian feather
     

    (Log in to remove this ad.)

  2. CD Xbow

    CD Xbow Club Legend

    Hawthorn
    Joined:
    Oct 14
    Posts:
    1,163
    Certainly could be a non avian therapod. I haven't been able to find an image of the most 'simple' feather. The feathered ornithopods from northern hemisphere dinos have had a few different types of feather, clever Kulindadromeus had three, from wikipedia:

    "The feather remains discovered are of three types, adding a level of complexity to the evolution of feathers in dinosaurs.[2]The first type consists of hair-like filaments covering the trunk, neck and head. These are up to three centimetres long and resemble the stage 1 "dino-fuzz" already known from theropods like Sinosauropteryx. The second type is represented by groups of six or seven downwards-projecting filaments up to 1.5 centimetres long, originating from a base plate. These are present on the upper arm and thigh. They resemble the type 3 feathers of theropods. The base plates are ordered in a hexagonal pattern but do not touch each other. The third type is unique. It was found on the upper lower legs and consists of bundles of six or seven ribbon-like structures, up to two centimetres long. Each ribbon is constructed from about ten parallel filaments up to 0.1 millimetres wide"
     
    DeadJake likes this.
  3. Wizard17

    Wizard17 Brownlow Medallist

    Western Bulldogs
    Joined:
    Sep 13
    Posts:
    10,112
    Considering that Australia was closer to the south pole in the Cretaceous it wouldn't be too far fetched to expect our Ornithopods to have had some sort of insulating feathers. Actually would expect it. Same goes with Avian Theropods like Australovenator.
     
    DeadJake likes this.
  4. CD Xbow

    CD Xbow Club Legend

    Hawthorn
    Joined:
    Oct 14
    Posts:
    1,163
    Yes, I believe that's the common believe by the local paleo's. It would be ideal to be getting more material from specimens from Koonwarra, finding some bones and feathers in close association. I may be wrong, but I don't think there are currently any digs going on, most of the previous materials were related to road cuttings.

    I've been trying to 'protofeather' one of the Leaellynasaura models I have built, but so far it hasn't gone well for technical reasons. The original 2 I've done what I call the 'full crocodile', but they look like they would be very, very cold. I decided I needed an 'analog', and used Kulindadromeus, Tom Parker has done an illustration, showing the 3 feathers and 3 types of scales. The bottom illustration is Tom's original layered over a skeleton, the top one I have tried to realistically posture it, color it etc. Unfinished at present and may stay that way.
    Kulindadromeusr_recon_small.jpg
     
    Wizard17, DeadJake and moistie like this.
  5. Wizard17

    Wizard17 Brownlow Medallist

    Western Bulldogs
    Joined:
    Sep 13
    Posts:
    10,112
    Wonder if they could find any fossilised melanin in the feathers to work out the colours. Been done elsewhere with other fossils.
     
  6. Wizard17

    Wizard17 Brownlow Medallist

    Western Bulldogs
    Joined:
    Sep 13
    Posts:
    10,112
    Talking about Ornithopods a new species was found up at lightning ridge.
     
    moistie and GreyCrow like this.
  7. CD Xbow

    CD Xbow Club Legend

    Hawthorn
    Joined:
    Oct 14
    Posts:
    1,163

    "Weewarrasauras pobeni
    is the first dinosaur to be named in New South Wales in almost a century, following a chance discovery of a jawbone fragment in a bucket of opal rubble near Lightning Ridge."

    Like most Australian finds it's pretty sparse, part of a jawbone, clearly another ornithopod. We must have had a lot of chicken/turkey sized ornithopods running around Oz in the Cretaceous.

    I think it's the fossilised melanosomes rather than the melanin, they work out the colour by comparing the shape of the fossil melanosomes to melanosomes from extant birds, it's not just the type of pigment melanosomes produce, it's also their arrangement which produces colouration by 'structural coloration' effects, eg irridescence.
     
    moistie likes this.
Back To Top

Share This Page