Poker terms

(Log in to remove this ad.)

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
overfull - the nut full house (though could be tied or a loser to quads)

underfull - a non-nut full house
overset - a higher set than your opponent

underset - a lower set than your opponent

A few weeks back at Crown, I flopped a set of 4s and got busted by a flopped set of Jacks. On Saturday night, I flopped a set of 4s and was wary of a possible flopped overset. I busted him with Kings though. I look forward to oversetting someone live one day.
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
live straddle - a pre-flop blind minimum raise placed from the under the gun player. Pre-flop action begins with UTG+1. If action returns to the straddle without a raise, the straddle has the option to raise

live double straddle - a pre-flop blind 2xBB raise placed from the under the gun player

regular straddle - as per a live straddle except if the straddle is not re-raised, the straddle is not given the option to re-raise

sleeper - a pre-flop blind raise placed from any position at the table other than under the gun
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Full-Bet Rule - the rule used in No Limit Holdem to determine the minimum bet or raise on any betting round.

EXAMPLE:
Player A - 5100; Player B - 2900; Player C - 850; Player D - 4200

Player A bets 500, Player B calls, Player C goes all-in for 850. When a player moves all-in for less than a raise (in this case, a raise would be to 1000 or more), there are two different rules that apply:
- a player that has yet to act on this betting round DOES have the option to raise
- if such a player does not raise, a player that has acted on this betting round does NOT have the option to raise

Thus, if Player D elects to fold or call, Players A and B cannot raise.

If Player D elects to raise, that is call the 850 and raise 500 or more (ie. the current full bet), Players A and B will have the option to raise.
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Stop and Go Technique - A potentially dangerous technique where you save a bet pre-flop only to open bet post-flop.

eg. You wake up with TT in the BB and choose to call a pre-flop raiser rather than re-raise. The flop has no overcards and you bet strongly into the raiser. If he has two high cards, he's making a -EV play by calling. Of course he could have a higher pair or a set and you could find yourself in trouble. The strategy is tending towards small-ball play and away from a long-ball Kill Phil style. Many players will call a re-raise pre-flop, but fold to a bet on the flop, or even a continuation lead out bet on the turn. The trick is knowing when to make this play when an overcard flops. The play can also be made when you have overcards and the flop missed you. If you have AQ and you suspect your opponent also has unpaired high cards, even AK, a stop and go just might take down the pot for you on the flop as you represent a made hand.
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Orphan Stack - a stack, usually at a Sit n Go, that doesn't belong to anyone. Sometimes a Sit n Go will begin with a player short. Any player that busts can buy back in and play the previously orphaned stack.
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Not really terms, just notation.

T10K / t10K - a way to denote a tournament's start bank ie. $10,000 in tournament chips

2000/4000/200 - a way to denote a particular blind level, with antes.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Knowledge

Norm Smith Medallist
Joined
Aug 18, 2003
Posts
7,242
Likes
93
Location
Harlem
AFL Club
Collingwood
Other Teams
MUFC, Trailblazers, Ravens
when someone refers to a player as LAG, what does that mean?
 

Borgsta

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
Apr 3, 2003
Posts
27,044
Likes
128
Location
Melb.
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Other Teams
Tottenham, Orlando
Well in that case I've found myself playing really "stoned" lately after a bad beat instead of going on tilt. It's helped a lot. Getting much better at controlling my emotions.
 

Armwarmer

All Australian
Joined
Feb 5, 2007
Posts
891
Likes
6
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
St Kilda
Me too, I took some pretty horrendous beats (2 and 3 outers) tonight in a live tourney and didn't even batter an eyelid. I just shipped the chips over and moved straight onto the next hand. Didn't steam or tilt at all.

I think it's starting to apply to things other than poker too. I guess all the money I'm losing is some sort of 'patience fee', I'm paying.

Reminds me of that FTP add with Phil Ivey catching his wife in bed with some other guy.
 

Borgsta

Brownlow Medallist
Joined
Apr 3, 2003
Posts
27,044
Likes
128
Location
Melb.
AFL Club
Western Bulldogs
Other Teams
Tottenham, Orlando
shootout - a tournament where only 1 player advances from each table.
Double Shootout - a tournament where only 1 player advances from each table but the top 2 (at least) win a prize.
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Double Shootout - a tournament where only 1 player advances from each table but the top 2 (at least) win a prize.
http://www.pokerstars.com/poker/tournaments/types/

A shootout is a special kind of multi-table tournament. Normally, when you play in a multi-table tournament, players are moved from table to table to balance the number of players at each table. Eventually, the fortunate last nine players end up at the "final table". In a shootout, no such table balancing is done. You are stuck at your original table until only one player is left standing. If you win that table, you advance to another table and repeat the process against players who each won their first table. In a DOUBLE SHOOTOUT, you need to win two tables to win the event, although often there is some money for everybody who makes the second table. In a TRIPLE SHOOTOUT, you must win three tables to win the entire event (again, there may well be some prize money distributed along the way).

Note that this whole process could be extended to quadruple shootouts and on up. Also, the tables don't necessarily have to start at nine players each. For instance, for the 2004 WSOP, we ran triple shootouts with four-player tables (a total of 64 players in each event).


So you could say the PokerPro tournament at Crown is a double shootout. There should be a term for a shootout where top 2 from each table progress, which is what usually happens at Crown.
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Man I'm so happy to have found this.

OTB - on the button

I always put BTN, which was just my silly abbreviation, but having seen someone use OTB, that's the winner I reckon.

So we have: UTG (or EP1), UTG1 (or EP2 or UTG+1), UTG2 (or EP3 or UTG+2), MP1, MP2, [MP3,] HJ, CO, OTB, SB, BB
 

red+black

Hall of Famer
Joined
Jul 12, 2001
Posts
37,227
Likes
5,061
Location
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Liverpool, Storm
Flashing - when a player inadvertently doesn't cover their hole cards properly, or when a dealer has a poor technique and a player might be able to see the cards as they are dealt.
 
Top Bottom