Leaving Australia to live overseas.

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The Dice Man

Brownlow Medallist
Apr 6, 2005
21,458
11,187
La Côte d'Azur
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Richmond
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They have negative gearing there? How does this all work for taxation purposes if you were to move back to Aus?
I really dont know. We did consult an accountant a while back and he said things change if we buy a 3rd property and we will have to be clever. But a 3rd will be our residence so not sure what happens. As for tax if we did move back, again no idea. Will come to that bridge if we ever come to it.
 

Total Power

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 19, 2004
29,212
9,996
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Port Adelaide
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Online business, and yeah, I've heard that $1,500/m is enough for a decent lifestyle in Bulgaria, hence my desire to go and check it out.
Yeah m8, for sure, hop on an easyjet/ryanair flight for 50 pounds and get to london in 3 hours for the weekend if you have the extra cash. Or head somewhere cheaper like Romania, Greece ,Cyprus, Turkey or even Jordan and Israel is ******* awesome closer to home. That's what i do! can't complain life is ******* great, we almost always get to visit 2/3 countries a month for the weekend atleast. With summer coming, i want to explore the entire Balkans and the black sea area. Lots of beautiful places like Georgia.
 
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Silent Alarm

sack Lyon
Jul 9, 2010
24,175
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Fremantle

Elroo

Premiership Player
Jul 2, 2014
3,102
4,267
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North Melbourne
Pretty good one going in Corsica for about £300,000. Middle of a hilly bush. Windows open to the beach. Ya would.
Crazy isn't it!

I looked at this one, view of the mountains, pool, 4 Bedroom, 2 bathrooms!

https://www.french-property.com/sale-property/428-AF22455

For that sort of money in Australia your getting a 250m2 block of land 1 1/2 hr half from the city, with views into your neighbours kitchen who is metres from yours!

We've got the equity in the house to pay cash for something like this in France, plus the investment income to support us over there. But I have elderly parents who won't move and no other family in Vic to help them!
 

The Dice Man

Brownlow Medallist
Apr 6, 2005
21,458
11,187
La Côte d'Azur
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Richmond
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Mid-Pyrénées even better, pool, views for less than $500k Australian.

https://www.french-property.com/sale-property/318-294

View attachment 678776View attachment 678777View attachment 678778

So for less than $500k Australian, you could live in France on a hill with amazing views, wineries nearby!
It's the midi-pyrenees so there wont be wineries too close.. you may have to drive an hour or more. Not much happening, and not many people living in the Midi but it is quite beautiful. My wife's family have a holiday home in a little village called Montjaux with spectacular views, that was the childhood home of her Grandmother. It's so quiet and peaceful. It's cheese making area and you can see Roquefort from their terrace. Wild deer roam the mountain above the village, and the River Tarn is a few kilometres down the hill.

There is an Australian author who resides in the village but Ive never been able to find out the name. It has a population of around 90, but does increase in summer.


Property aint that cheap on the Riviera though.
 

Silent Alarm

sack Lyon
Jul 9, 2010
24,175
26,472
AFL Club
Fremantle
uhh why would you buy that when you can buy a two bedroom house that requires renovating in noble park south for only 200k more?
Are you actually serious? fu** you are a moron.

Corsica is in between Italy and France. Noble Park south is between Noble Park and Dandenong. Strike one.

These houses are generally a hundred years old, properly built with respect to the environment. They're architecturally sound. New cardboard pop-ups don't even compete with longevity and craftsmanship. Lots of bedrooms, space within, that sort of thing. I won't even get started about no need for a fence versus you and Michael Simmons next door who works at Retravision squibbing and squabbling over who should pay for the new neetascreen fence. And ya know, calming hill versus a cul-de-sac still in half-completion.

The only positive is Noble Park probably has four Dan Murphy's in periphery and probably 1500 times the availability of piss tho. So you got me.
 

class78

All Australian
Jun 19, 2013
858
1,485
AFL Club
Adelaide
Are you actually serious? **** you are a moron.

Corsica is in between Italy and France. Noble Park south is between Noble Park and Dandenong. Strike one.

These houses are generally a hundred years old, properly built with respect to the environment. They're architecturally sound. New cardboard pop-ups don't even compete with longevity and craftsmanship. Lots of bedrooms, space within, that sort of thing. I won't even get started about no need for a fence versus you and Michael Simmons next door who works at Retravision squibbing and squabbling over who should pay for the new neetascreen fence. And ya know, calming hill versus a cul-de-sac still in half-completion.

The only positive is Noble Park probably has four Dan Murphy's in periphery and probably 1500 times the availability of piss tho. So you got me.

how many french and italian afl players are there? like mark lecras? lol

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandenong_Stingrays


read it and weep sucka
 

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Elroo

Premiership Player
Jul 2, 2014
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It's the midi-pyrenees so there wont be wineries too close.. you may have to drive an hour or more. Not much happening, and not many people living in the Midi but it is quite beautiful. My wife's family have a holiday home in a little village called Montjaux with spectacular views, that was the childhood home of her Grandmother. It's so quiet and peaceful. It's cheese making area and you can see Roquefort from their terrace. Wild deer roam the mountain above the village, and the River Tarn is a few kilometres down the hill.

There is an Australian author who resides in the village but Ive never been able to find out the name. It has a population of around 90, but does increase in summer.

Property aint that cheap on the Riviera though.
- 1 hr to wineries :heavycheck:
- amazing views :heavycheck:
- cheese making :heavycheck:
- Cheese eating :heavycheck::heavycheck:
- significantly cheaper than Aus :heavycheck:
- the ability to live cheaper than Australia :heavycheck:

Might have to look at it seriously once I decide to take the decision to retire with the wife.
 

wadistance

Premiership Player
Sep 17, 2011
3,802
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definitely its a retirement option, but its the theoretical equivalent of moving to somewhere like Mudgee, or smaller. Its a really nice place, but unless you can work from home, its going to be hard to get any sort of meaningful employment in a small town, unless you can fluently speak the language and fill a labor shortage.
 

Gibbsy

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Oct 12, 2009
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Have really enjoyed reading this thread, very wholesome, thanks to all the contributors.

My mind has wavered over the last few years over whether this is something I want to do. It was definitely a consideration post-uni in 2016 after I went solo to Europe for four months and just wandered around on a rail pass. I felt like the two most liveable places I went to were Hamburg and Manchester.

But in the years since, I've moved out of home, started playing footy again which introduced me to a whole new group of friends and now have just got a new job in that very same town. I sometimes feel guilty for enjoying the small-town lifestyle that I lead because I don't want to feel like one of those people who just ends up living in the same town for 40 years and becoming a part of the furniture. I dunno, I find it a bit hard to put into words.
 

wadistance

Premiership Player
Sep 17, 2011
3,802
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Have really enjoyed reading this thread, very wholesome, thanks to all the contributors.

My mind has wavered over the last few years over whether this is something I want to do. It was definitely a consideration post-uni in 2016 after I went solo to Europe for four months and just wandered around on a rail pass. I felt like the two most liveable places I went to were Hamburg and Manchester.

But in the years since, I've moved out of home, started playing footy again which introduced me to a whole new group of friends and now have just got a new job in that very same town. I sometimes feel guilty for enjoying the small-town lifestyle that I lead because I don't want to feel like one of those people who just ends up living in the same town for 40 years and becoming a part of the furniture. I dunno, I find it a bit hard to put into words.
It’s interesting - i really enjoy the life here but I also had it great back in Perth in the late 2000s - was definitely part of the bubble and I miss that quite a bit


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Elroo

Premiership Player
Jul 2, 2014
3,102
4,267
AFL Club
North Melbourne
definitely its a retirement option, but its the theoretical equivalent of moving to somewhere like Mudgee, or smaller. Its a really nice place, but unless you can work from home, its going to be hard to get any sort of meaningful employment in a small town, unless you can fluently speak the language and fill a labor shortage.
Yep that would be my option, retire with income from super, service pension and dividends. Sell up in Australia, buy a 3 bed apartment in Melbourne for the children and our visits, then retire to France living a life of drinking wine, eating cheese and travelling around the continent.
 

Kummerspeck

Premiership Player
Sep 12, 2013
4,857
4,579
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But in the years since, I've moved out of home, started playing footy again which introduced me to a whole new group of friends and now have just got a new job in that very same town. I sometimes feel guilty for enjoying the small-town lifestyle that I lead because I don't want to feel like one of those people who just ends up living in the same town for 40 years and becoming a part of the furniture. I dunno, I find it a bit hard to put into words.
If it sways you, nothing important at home really changes. I've been out of Australia for four years and I've been home twice. When I first came home I couldn't believe I'd left, at the end of two weeks I was ready to go. Was nice catching up and seeing family, but people were still on the same wheel they were when I left. That said, setting up in a new place is a massive grind, but when you're settled somewhere you like, it's pretty amazing.
 

Angus Young

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 3, 2008
5,660
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But in the years since, I've moved out of home, started playing footy again which introduced me to a whole new group of friends and now have just got a new job in that very same town. I sometimes feel guilty for enjoying the small-town lifestyle that I lead because I don't want to feel like one of those people who just ends up living in the same town for 40 years and becoming a part of the furniture. I dunno, I find it a bit hard to put into words.
I totally get it... it's not easy. It's a conundrum.

If you're happy maybe stick with it.
 

wadistance

Premiership Player
Sep 17, 2011
3,802
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So far so good. Finished up work in Adelaide on the Saturday night a couple of weeks ago, flew in to Switzerland on Wednesday and started work on Thursday so I didn't really have much of a break in between but I think that's kind of helped me get settled. It didn't stop snowing the first day I got here which was cool as I hadn't seen snow since I was about 7 but since then it's been more or less pretty reasonable weather, a few rainy days and a few clear. Still fairly cold. The first week was, I'm not sure if difficult is the right word, maybe just a bit of a shock to the system. Everyone where I'm working is speaking German to each other, although most of them speak English too I did feel a little bit intimidated/isolated. Even trying to get my head around how everything works in the kitchen, all the dockets are in german so I was so confused at first. But it's no different in any new workplace I guess it was just a little more to take in than I anticipated. The owner was in the kitchen helping me out the first few days but since then it's pretty much been just me and this older Swiss lady in her 60s and so far no major dramas, even had guests ask for recipes the first 2 dishes I brought in myself so I'm scoring points. As we've all gotten to know each other better though I have really started loving it this week. We're teaching each other new words in our languages and having fun so far.
It is a quiet little spot which is the only kind of downside but everything's so close its not that far to go to find something happening. Still checking the wrong side of the road when crossing though
Here's a pic of the view from my room at the moment
View attachment 656139

Pretty amazing scenery, the photos don't even do it justice to see the sheer size of those mountains in person. Have only had two days off so far so I haven't really been able to get out and see much yet, but there'll be plenty of time for that. I get every Wednesday and Thursday off and I'll definitely be here for a year at least before moving on to another country so exciting times ahead.
Any updates mate? Interested to hear how it’s all going still


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mouncey2franklin

Premiership Player
Jun 16, 2018
3,431
4,787
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North Melbourne
Have really enjoyed reading this thread, very wholesome, thanks to all the contributors.

My mind has wavered over the last few years over whether this is something I want to do. It was definitely a consideration post-uni in 2016 after I went solo to Europe for four months and just wandered around on a rail pass. I felt like the two most liveable places I went to were Hamburg and Manchester.

But in the years since, I've moved out of home, started playing footy again which introduced me to a whole new group of friends and now have just got a new job in that very same town. I sometimes feel guilty for enjoying the small-town lifestyle that I lead because I don't want to feel like one of those people who just ends up living in the same town for 40 years and becoming a part of the furniture. I dunno, I find it a bit hard to put into words.
If you have friends, a good footy club, and a job you don't hate in the small town, then to me, you are living a good life.

Traveling and living overseas has its benefits, but there is no way to replace the real social bonds of living in one place and having genuine relationships with people.

Big cities have their advantages but small towns can offer an easy, stress-free life.
 

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