Sydney FC thread

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giggler99

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Not sure I trust this guy on Twitter doesn’t seem to get much right but what do you guys think?


Where would you fit him in that front four? Which already looks pretty formidable.
 

General Giant

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Not sure I trust this guy on Twitter doesn’t seem to get much right but what do you guys think?


Where would you fit him in that front four? Which already looks pretty formidable.
Surely not.

There's nowhere for him to go and from what I've heard he wasn't really complimentary to the A-league.
 

giggler99

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Tempe job: Sydney FC revisit plans for centre of excellence near airport

Vince Rugari, Sarah Keoghan

Sydney FC could go back to the future in their long-held ambition to build a centre of excellence after renewing a push to house their A-League, W-League, youth and NPL teams at Tempe Reserve.
Five years ago, the club was involved in a tender process to build their headquarters at the fields on the banks of the Cooks River, adjacent to Sydney airport, but withdrew their application due to a forecast cost blowout.

But the proposal appears to be back on the table after an "informal, unsolicited approach" was made by Sydney FC to the Inner West Council, according to their minutes from Tuesday night's meeting.
The existing playing fields at Tempe Reserve suffer from poor drainage, leading to mass cancellations of local football matches when there is wet weather.
The council moved to continue discussions with potential partners who could assist with funding upgrades for the fields and thus allow greater community access, as well as use for Sydney FC's elite-level teams.
The Sky Blues currently train at Macquarie University but have made no secret about their ambitions of a permanent home.
Club sources indicate Leichhardt Oval and its surrounds had been explored as a possible base for a centre of excellence, but that idea has been shelved because Sydney FC discovered their field usage demands would have displaced local teams.
"The site at Tempe is one of a number of options in discussion for our Centre of Excellence," the club said in a statement. "Our plans at each location will enhance and upgrade any existing sporting fields and provide elite facilities to the benefit of the local community."
NSW NPL team Sydney Olympic had been granted a period of exclusivity to develop the fields at Tempe Reserve after Sydney FC withdrew their application with the then-Marrickville Council in October 2014. However, that period has now lapsed, and the amalgamated Inner West Council is now seeking a new partnership.
Any plans for a centre of excellence would have to demonstrate a "clear community benefit" and enhance opportunities for "community access" to the reserve, the council's minutes said, as well as dovetailing with existing plans for synthetic pitches which will be built late next year.
It comes as Sydney's biggest rivals, Melbourne Victory, had their proposal to build a women's and youth football academy at Footscray Park rejected after a furious community backlash.
Unlike Footscray Park - an open, undeveloped green space in Melbourne's inner west - Tempe Reserve is already home to several sporting fields and is also used regularly by Newington College.
But there already appears to be opposition to the plans - Inner West Councillor Colin Hesse said he was "deeply concerned" that Mayor Darcy Byrne had not yet consulted the community about the proposal.

"The Inner West council has the second-lowest amount of open space in Sydney," he said. "I think we have to be really careful as a local government area when we are engaging with corporate sport, our focus should be on our local clubs, our casual users who throw a ball, walk a dog, or throw a boomerang that should be our focus."
Mr Hesse said the community would be "losing out significantly" if the deal were to go through and that "locking off public land for private uses" required a thorough consultation process.
"We’ve got to be really careful that we don’t put the cart before the horse," he said. "I’m concerned that the mayor, in particular, is focused on a big corporate sport ... we the council need to focus on the community first and what our community needs are, it’s presumptuous really."




thoughts General Giant ?
 

General Giant

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Tempe job: Sydney FC revisit plans for centre of excellence near airport

Vince Rugari, Sarah Keoghan

Sydney FC could go back to the future in their long-held ambition to build a centre of excellence after renewing a push to house their A-League, W-League, youth and NPL teams at Tempe Reserve.
Five years ago, the club was involved in a tender process to build their headquarters at the fields on the banks of the Cooks River, adjacent to Sydney airport, but withdrew their application due to a forecast cost blowout.

But the proposal appears to be back on the table after an "informal, unsolicited approach" was made by Sydney FC to the Inner West Council, according to their minutes from Tuesday night's meeting.
The existing playing fields at Tempe Reserve suffer from poor drainage, leading to mass cancellations of local football matches when there is wet weather.
The council moved to continue discussions with potential partners who could assist with funding upgrades for the fields and thus allow greater community access, as well as use for Sydney FC's elite-level teams.
The Sky Blues currently train at Macquarie University but have made no secret about their ambitions of a permanent home.
Club sources indicate Leichhardt Oval and its surrounds had been explored as a possible base for a centre of excellence, but that idea has been shelved because Sydney FC discovered their field usage demands would have displaced local teams.
"The site at Tempe is one of a number of options in discussion for our Centre of Excellence," the club said in a statement. "Our plans at each location will enhance and upgrade any existing sporting fields and provide elite facilities to the benefit of the local community."
NSW NPL team Sydney Olympic had been granted a period of exclusivity to develop the fields at Tempe Reserve after Sydney FC withdrew their application with the then-Marrickville Council in October 2014. However, that period has now lapsed, and the amalgamated Inner West Council is now seeking a new partnership.
Any plans for a centre of excellence would have to demonstrate a "clear community benefit" and enhance opportunities for "community access" to the reserve, the council's minutes said, as well as dovetailing with existing plans for synthetic pitches which will be built late next year.
It comes as Sydney's biggest rivals, Melbourne Victory, had their proposal to build a women's and youth football academy at Footscray Park rejected after a furious community backlash.
Unlike Footscray Park - an open, undeveloped green space in Melbourne's inner west - Tempe Reserve is already home to several sporting fields and is also used regularly by Newington College.
But there already appears to be opposition to the plans - Inner West Councillor Colin Hesse said he was "deeply concerned" that Mayor Darcy Byrne had not yet consulted the community about the proposal.

"The Inner West council has the second-lowest amount of open space in Sydney," he said. "I think we have to be really careful as a local government area when we are engaging with corporate sport, our focus should be on our local clubs, our casual users who throw a ball, walk a dog, or throw a boomerang that should be our focus."
Mr Hesse said the community would be "losing out significantly" if the deal were to go through and that "locking off public land for private uses" required a thorough consultation process.
"We’ve got to be really careful that we don’t put the cart before the horse," he said. "I’m concerned that the mayor, in particular, is focused on a big corporate sport ... we the council need to focus on the community first and what our community needs are, it’s presumptuous really."




thoughts General Giant ?
Would be great. Need a home. Benefits the community and the club.

Angry for you guys and the code wars scuppering the Vics attempts to build their own home. You guys taking it to court I heard?
 

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giggler99

Moderator
Jul 5, 2011
7,797
7,559
Melbourne
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Geelong
Other Teams
Victory, Napoli, Liverpool, Pens
Would be great. Need a home. Benefits the community and the club.

Angry for you guys and the code wars scuppering the Vics attempts to build their own home. You guys taking it to court I heard?
I hope it doesn't go to court it would just cost the club more money as well as drag on for years, in the intreim it will delay the Acedemy even longer.
Best thing to do is to just forget Marriybinong annd look elsewhere this time with a proper research and consultation with the constituents of the council they invest in.
 

General Giant

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Will new Sydney Football Stadium suit Sydney FC

Tom Smithies, The Daily Telegraph

December 6, 2019 9:15pm

The state government is set to appoint a construction firm for the rebuild of the Sydney Football Stadium by Christmas but serious concerns are growing that the result will be a $729 million white elephant.

As Sydney FC host another fixture at Kogarah’s Jubilee Oval on Saturday night, questions are being asked of whether the Sky Blues would be better sited at a smaller venue than the SFS long term, if the new stadium is built in a way that means it is almost always two-thirds empty and devoid of atmosphere for all of its tenants.
After Lend Lease walked away in July, either Multiplex and John Holland will be appointed in the next fortnight to build the new stadium, The Daily Telegraph understands.


But the design as it stands will not have the capability to screen off part of the 45,000-seat venue – switching between so-called “club mode” and “championship mode” - even though its tenants all average regular season crowds around 15,000.


This newspaper has been told that without it, Sydney FC may have to question whether the SFS is the right venue long term, after the success of hosting games at Jubilee and Leichhardt Ovals.
Currently the Sky Blues will have just four years of their existing tenancy agreement left when the stadium is due to be finished in 2022.
All tenants were initially promised by the SCG Trust, which runs the SFS, that an option such as an LED curtain to cover the upper tiers would be included in the design. The Roosters told The Daily Telegraph they still consider it “fundamentally important” to the design.
But the rebuild is out of the Trust’s hands, being overseen by Infrastructure NSW, and the curtain option was dropped by the government to save some $46m.

Infrastructure NSW says that “the stadium’s roof and upper tier is being designed to permit the future installation of a club mode curtain” – but the fear is that persuading government to spend money on a curtain years after the stadium is built will be much harder.

“The LED curtain was a key feature to the original design of the stadium that we supported,” said Roosters CEO Joe Kelly. “In the context of our regular crowds and creating the best possible match day experience, the inclusion of this technology is fundamentally important.
“It would be a shame if we didn’t include this capability considering the cost when amortised over the life of the new stadium.”
Sydney FC CEO Danny Townsend would not be drawn on the question of a curtain, but said: “The experience of hosting our games in smaller venues has been excellent so far and we’ve been able to provide our members with a fantastic atmosphere and family feel in each, mixed with the type of social occasion and event traditional football fans desire.
“But at the same time we are looking forward to moving back into our brand new, world class stadium at Moore Park which will have modern, state of the art facilities and the latest in technological advancements, providing our members with a world class fan experience.”

Stadiums in the MLS have shown what architects say are relatively simple ways to shrink the stadium visually. The Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta has a capacity of more than 71,000 but that can be cut to 42,500 thanks to a series of vertical LED curtains that drop down from the roof and cover the upper bowl of seats.
Similarly at BC Place in Vancouver, home of the White Caps, horizontal winches can extend a series of drapes over the lower bowl to create a secondary roof over the lower bowl of seating. These were retro-fitted less than a decade ago when the stadium’s inflatable roof was replaced.
Bill Johnson is design principal for HOK, a global architecture practice that led the Mercedes Benz Stadium design. He told The Daily Telegraph that the need to have a smaller-scale mode was added to the brief quite late in the design process once Arthur Blank, owner of the Atlanta Falcons NFL team, decided to bid of an MLS franchise that became Atlanta United.

The solution was a “scrim”, similar to the gauze backdrops used in theatres to project images onto but in this case made of an LED mesh.
“We already knew it was important to design a multipurpose venue, so we’d thought about factors such as the premium seating being accessible even in a smaller mode,” Johnson said.
“Everything we design is predicated on scalability. It mostly is to do with the visuals of the stadium, the seat colour, using lighting to de-emphasise seats you might not use.

“But we used a suspended ‘scrim’ from the roof to the front edge of the upper bowl, which becomes an opportunity to display the logo of the club or a sponsor.
“It’s pretty straightforward technology, it operates in the way a scrim does in a theatre. It’s not a great technological challenge and it’s much cheaper and simpler than retracting seats, which is the only other way of reducing the scale of a stadium.”
 
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