List Mgmt. Tom Wilson Signs with Collingwood

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Saintly Viewed

Premium Platinum
Aug 10, 2015
47,337
38,982
AFL Club
Collingwood
1small step for man kind.
A giant leap for Collingwood.


Interesting factoid:
Neil Armstrong actually stuffed up the line he said.

  • One small step for man, a giant leap for mankind
He should have included an “a” as in just him “a” man ie as one man not all of man.

  • One small step for a man, a giant leap for mankind.
 

MyManLynch

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 4, 2012
7,826
10,481
Singapore
AFL Club
Collingwood
A giant leap for Collingwood.


Interesting factoid:
Neil Armstrong actually stuffed up the line he said.

  • One small step for man, a giant leap for mankind
He should have included an “a” as in just him “a” man ie as one man not all of man.

  • One small step for a man, a giant leap for mankind.
Correct.
Although I read somewhere (?) that the ‘a’ was lost in static during the transmission back to Earth.
So I blame those dudes in Parks.
 

MyManLynch

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 4, 2012
7,826
10,481
Singapore
AFL Club
Collingwood
That must be it.

Those Parkes boys they didn’t dish it out.
Bunch of dish lickers.
NASA official script listed the ‘a’.
Armstrong claimed he included the ‘a’.
The ‘a’ never made it to Earth...it’s still floating around in deep dark space somewhere...commonly referred to as an a-hole.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

76woodenspooners

Premium Platinum
Jun 4, 2011
16,658
24,124
Sydney
AFL Club
Collingwood
A giant leap for Collingwood.


Interesting factoid:
Neil Armstrong actually stuffed up the line he said.

  • One small step for man, a giant leap for mankind
He should have included an “a” as in just him “a” man ie as one man not all of man.

  • One small step for a man, a giant leap for mankind.
I’d argue that what he said was perfectly correct for two reasons ...

(1) Consider ‘countable’ and ‘non-countable’ nouns. Countable nouns need an ‘article’ (‘a’ / ‘an’, ‘the’) as in “I ate a hot hog” and non-countable nouns don’t “I drank water”. Some may use both forms, eg “I ate fish” versus “I ate a fish” and in this particular case the two sentences have different meaning to each other.

So is “man” countable? Absolutely, that’s its conventional form - “I spoke to a man”. Can man be non-countable? I’d argue that it could “With my spray can I scrawled on the wall my message to man about the importance of climate change”. Also note that “a man” is gender specific and “man” is not.

Is the use of “man” and “mankind” a tortology that confuses the meaning of the phrase? I don’t think so, “man” refers ambiguously to one, more or many people. “Mankind” refers unambiguously to all people in a timeless manner. For example, it could happily have been rephrased as “One small step for this generation, one giant leap for all generations”.

Does “One small step for a man ...” and “one small step for man ...” have substantively different meanings? I’d argue that they do. “A man” would have unambiguously referred to Neil Armstrong. “Man” ambiguously could refer to either Neil Armstrong, or the NASA team, or the US, or all people of the day involved in the space race including the Russians - both men and women.

(2) English (Unlike French or Spanish) is not a governed language. The can happily create words and phrases (“WTF”, “emoji”) and ain’t nobody is in any position of authority to tell us what is right or wrong (unless you have an English teacher). The moon landing was such an epic event, that whatever phrase Neil Armstrong uttered was going to enter the lexicon whether it was grammatically correct or not. (Eg: JFK’s iconic “Ich bin ein Berliner” is grammatically incorrect (in German) but the phrase has universal understanding across the world’s languages and has been adopted and even repurposed: “Je suis Charlie”)

Personally, I reckon that if Neil really did stray from the script, then he did good.
 
Last edited:

Saintly Viewed

Premium Platinum
Aug 10, 2015
47,337
38,982
AFL Club
Collingwood
I’d argue that what he said was perfectly correct for two reasons ...

(1) Consider ‘countable’ and ‘non-countable’ nouns. Countable nouns need an ‘article’ (‘a’ / ‘an’, ‘the’) as in “I ate a hot hog” and non-countable nouns don’t “I drank water”. Some may use both forms, eg “I ate fish” versus “I ate a fish” and in this particular case the two sentences have different meaning to each other.

So is “man” countable? Absolutely, that’s its conventional form - “I spoke to a man”. Can man be non-countable? I’d argue that it could “With my spray can I scrawled on the wall my message to man about the importance of climate change”. Also note that “a man” is gender specific and “man” is not.

Is the use of “man” and “mankind” a tortology that confuses the meaning of the phrase? I don’t think so, “man” refers ambiguously to one, more or many people. “Mankind” refers unambiguously to all people in a timeless manner. For example, it could happily have been rephrased as “One small step for this generation, one giant leap for all generations”.

Does “One small step for a man ...” and “one small step for man ...” have substantively different meanings? I’d argue that they do. “A man” would have unambiguously referred to Neil Armstrong. “Man” ambiguously could refer to either Neil Armstrong, or the NASA team, or the US, or all people of the day involved in the space race including the Russians - both men and women.

(2) English (Unlike French or Spanish) is not a governed language. The can happily create words and phrases (“WTF”, “emoji”) and ain’t nobody is in any position of authority to tell us what is right or wrong (unless you have an English teacher). The moon landing was such an epic event, that whatever phrase Neil Armstrong uttered was going to enter the lexicon whether it was grammatically correct or not. (Eg: JFK’s iconic “Ich bin ein Berliner” is grammatically incorrect (in German) but the phrase has universal understanding across the world’s languages and has been adopted and even repurposed: “Je suis Charlie”)

Personally, I reckon that if Neil really did stray from the script, then he did good.
You speak or write correctly.

That said, it might have been better

Then again, he stepped on the moon.

He wins!!!!!
 

35Daicos

Premium Platinum
Mar 6, 2011
6,590
7,653
Adelaide
AFL Club
Collingwood
Other Teams
Collingwood (VFL), Man Utd.
Tom is not on our list on footywire, whats the go there?
There's quite a few players who have been recently added to club lists (as Cat. B Rookies) who they don't seem to know about, namely Butters and Thomas (Fremantle), Murtagh (Gold Coast - signed as a Cat. B but moved to Cat. A), Pepper (Hawthorn), McGuinness (North Melb.) and O'Connor (Sydney). Obviously our man Wilson as well.

The AFL should have a page on it's website that shows exactly who is on all the lists as things stand. It would take a lot of the guesswork out of it. Not even the AFL Record Season Guide and Football Record get it right; there's always a few errors to be found there (especially in terms of who is Cat. A and who is Cat B). The AFL website gives so much coverage to the drafts and trading yet they don't finish the job by putting out totally reliable lists that everyone can use. Silly!!

I think there's another list lodgement today (before the SSP starts tomorrow) so it would be a good time for them to put something definitive out there, but I'm not holding my breath!
 

Top Bottom