List Mgmt. 2024 Draft Thread

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Think it can be simplified a lot easier than that you must have a pick in the round that the bid comes in. So if a bid comes in the first round you must have a 1st Round pick any deficit in points come off your next live pick / picks to make up the difference. That way you might be fortunate to pick up a talent but there is no getting ahead of a pick to get 2x 1st round talents.
And depending on the differential could wipe out your draft hand. And provide some balance and also the behind closed door deals *** cough ** cough Viney
What happens where a bid comes after you pick? A bid comes at pick 18 - what then?
 
What happens where a bid comes after you pick? A bid comes at pick 18 - what then?
Well it was only a quick snapshot I hadn't thought out every scenario.
Let's say that we're to happen the rest of your picks are used up and any remaining deficit comes off your 1st next year, or wherever the corresponding round is that the bid comes in.
 
Think it can be simplified a lot easier than that you must have a pick in the round that the bid comes in. So if a bid comes in the first round you must have a 1st Round pick any deficit in points come off your next live pick / picks to make up the difference. That way you might be fortunate to pick up a talent but there is no getting ahead of a pick to get 2x 1st round talents.
And depending on the differential could wipe out your draft hand. And provide some balance and also the behind closed door deals *** cough ** cough Viney
That gets muddy when a club bids at pick 17 or 18, though it's good in theory.

I'd rather them just get rid of the discount and up the value of the top 10 picks whilst removing any value past pick 40.

Also I'd like them to discouraged teams moving players to the rookie list to open up another list spot to take in extra points, it goes against why the rookie draft was brought in to begin with and isn't a great look to me. I'd say you can still move a player to the rookie list but you don't get any points linked to that pick.
 

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Given the likely Baz compo I'd love to get up at the pointy end of this draft and get another mid. Feel we are short another 1 or 2 classy midfielders coming through
 
That gets muddy when a club bids at pick 17 or 18, though it's good in theory.

I'd rather them just get rid of the discount and up the value of the top 10 picks whilst removing any value past pick 40.

Also I'd like them to discouraged teams moving players to the rookie list to open up another list spot to take in extra points, it goes against why the rookie draft was brought in to begin with and isn't a great look to me. I'd say you can still move a player to the rookie list but you don't get any points linked to that pick.
Agree what I was proposing wasn't a total solution. I would like to see everyone just pay a fair price, however that comes about. There is way too much collusion and the current system feeds into that, change needs to occur.
 
Given the likely Baz compo I'd love to get up at the pointy end of this draft and get another mid. Feel we are short another 1 or 2 classy midfielders coming through
If we could enter the draft about halfway through the first round Lalor would be my target. He would fit nicely in the forwardline for a year or two until a midfield position opened up.
 
Well it was only a quick snapshot I hadn't thought out every scenario.
Let's say that we're to happen the rest of your picks are used up and any remaining deficit comes off your 1st next year, or wherever the corresponding round is that the bid comes in.
The reason why I posted what I did, which you responded directly to, was because I had thought of that scenario.

The solution you propose is exactly what the current system is.
 
The reason why I posted what I did, which you responded directly to, was because I had thought of that scenario.

The solution you propose is exactly what the current system is.
Yes it is similar but as it stands you don't have to have a pick in the round that the bid comes in. What I proposed prevents using a bunch of junk picks to match a 1st round bid.
Also what I proposed isn't a well thought out repsone more a broad brush strokes that smarter people could round out a lot better than I am capable of!!
 
Bo Allan interests me as that tall mid who can also play defence. Seems to have good pace as well.


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He related to Ed from Pies?
 

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I actually think we need to look at a smaller defender. Even two. Our best rebound defender is now a gun midfielder
 
I actually think we need to look at a smaller defender. Even two. Our best rebound defender is now a gun midfielder

I’ve liked what I’ve seen from Lachie Jacques and Tobie Travaglia. Small defender Harry Charleston also from VC looked good.

Then there’s Harrison Oliver that’s also being talked up recently.

Think Pat Retschko from the chargers has lots of potential as that half back / winger, he hasn’t been spoken about much. Great size 188cm, good speed - has the makings of a steal late in my opinion.

So there should be a few options.

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I actually think we need to look at a smaller defender. Even two. Our best rebound defender is now a gun midfielder

Not sure about 2. We could certainly do with one preferably a mid sized one that can play on a small. Often small forwards can make good running defenders and i want the club to keep recruiting at least one of those every year. We seem to do the opposite for some reason with JJ, Vandermeer, Richards all tried up forward and it very rarely works.

Reckon Gallagher is a small defender long term anyway. He missed out on being drafted initially when he was a fwd/wing and wasn't really on the radar of clubs until he made the move down back in the middle of the season as an overager.
His defensive game is pretty good just needs to stop kicking it in to the man on the mark.
 
Not sure about 2. We could certainly do with one preferably a mid sized one that can play on a small. Often small forwards can make good running defenders and i want the club to keep recruiting at least one of those every year. We seem to do the opposite for some reason with JJ, Vandermeer, Richards all tried up forward and it very rarely works.

Reckon Gallagher is a small defender long term anyway. He missed out on being drafted initially when he was a fwd/wing and wasn't really on the radar of clubs until he made the move down back in the middle of the season as an overager.
His defensive game is pretty good just needs to stop kicking it in to the man on the mark.
If we cringe at bramble steaming off hbf and turning it over then I'd hate to see the melts at when gags does this. His foot skills need a lot of work
 

JUNE DRAFT RANKINGS

1. Josh Smillie (Eastern Ranges/Vic Metro)
The early favourite to be the No. 1 pick, Smillie is putting together an impressive campaign. A 194cm big-bodied midfielder who models his game on Carlton captain Patrick Cripps, Smillie has serious size, power and ball-winning ability. While primarily an onballer, he has also shown he can impact across halfback and half-forward if required. Smillie has averaged 24 disposals, 5.6 clearances and 1.6 goals across seven Coates Talent League matches for the Eastern Ranges this season, while also shining as captain in two AFL Academy exhibition matches in April.

Levi Ashcroft could match his brother Will and be claimed as a top-two pick. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
2. Levi Ashcroft (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
A classy 179cm midfielder-forward, Ashcroft knows how to find the footy like few others in this year’s draft class. A Brisbane Lions father-son prospect, he could well match older brother Will and be a No. 2 pick to the Lions in November. The son of three-time premiership player Marcus, Ashcroft possesses elite workrate, makes good decisions and brings leadership. He has been a consistent performer at all levels of football this season, which has included games for the Sandringham Dragons, Brighton Grammar and the AFL Academy.
3. Finn O’Sullivan (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Country)
What sets O’Sullivan apart from the other midfielders in this draft is his well-rounded skillset. The Koroit talent is a great mark overhead, cuts opposition sides apart with his kicking and doesn’t need a lot of the footy to have a major impact. After being sidelined with a broken thumb earlier in the year, O’Sullivan will miss most of the national championships after undergoing surgery on a broken finger as his rotten luck continued. But he already has plenty of runs on the board, earning a spot in the U18 All-Australian team as a bottom-ager at last year’s carnival and claiming the MVP award at the U16 championships.

Jagga Smith had 50 disposals in a recent Coates League game. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
4. Jagga Smith (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
A lively and creative ball-winner, Smith is on the smaller side as a lightly-built 181cm midfielder. However, he more than makes up for it in resilience, footy smarts and pure skills. Smith has drawn comparisons to Port Adelaide’s Zak Butters this year, who is a player he watches closely. He was one of the best players for the AFL Academy against Footscray’s VFL side in April in his first game against men. Smith also made headlines after racking up 50 disposals for the Oakleigh Chargers in a recent Coates Talent League match, becoming just the third player in the competition’s history to reach that mark in a match.

Luke Trainor with AFL Academy coach Tarkyn Lockyer. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
5. Luke Trainor (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
A 194cm defender, Trainor has emerged as the best key position prospect this year. A former forward, he is now loving life down back and looks up to the likes of Tom Stewart and Jeremy Howe. Trainor’s overhead marking is a clear strength, while his one-on-one contest work has been impressive. With ball in hand he is highly composed and he possesses a nice kick to provide some rebound for his team. Trainor was best afield in the AFL Academy’s first exhibition match in April, while also playing some impressive games for the Dragons and school team Brighton Grammar.

Christian Moraes is a running machine. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
6. Christian Moraes (Eastern Ranges/Vic Metro)
A dynamic 183cm midfielder, Moraes is a running machine who covers the ground extremely well. He works hard both sides of the ball and can be dangerous around goals when he pushes forward, evidenced by his nine goals from his first three games for the Ranges this year. In the thick of the action, Moraes is tough, has clean hands and brings real composure. He had an up-and-down few weeks after copping a heavy knock during an AFL Academy game in April, but has still averaged 25.7 disposals, 5.3 marks, four clearances and 7.5 score involvements across six Coates Talent League games this year.

Leo Lombard featured in Gold Coast’s VFL premiership last year. Picture: Jenny Evans/AFL Photos/via Getty Images
7. Leo Lombard (Gold Coast Suns Academy/Allies)
While he is another player on the smaller side for a midfielder at 178cm, Lombard is hard-at-it and is a prolific ball winner. He featured in the Suns’ VFL premiership side as a 16-year-old last year and has continued to impress playing for multiple teams at different levels in the early part of this season – including another VFL appearance where he finished with 28 disposals. Lombard has a great workrate, is cool and composed with ball in hand and can be very dangerous around goal. He has been likened to AFL Rising Star nominee Jake Rogers, who has been working with Lombard and refers to him as being “like a little brother”.

Sid Draper appears to be the leading prospect from South Australia. Picture: Sarah Reed/AFL Photos via Getty Images
8. Sid Draper (South Adelaide/South Australia)
A powerful and quick midfielder, Draper starred as a bottom-age player for South Australia during last year’s under-18 national championships, winning the side’s MVP award. He has dazzling speed and elite workrate, allowing him to get from contest to contest and impact play. Draper – who looks up to Port Adelaide pair Connor Rozee and Zak Butters – missed the start of this season with stress fractures in his shin, but returned to fitness in time to captain his state in its first match of this year’s national championships.

Taj Hotton is expected to still be a high draft pick despite an ACL blow. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
9. Taj Hotton (Sandringham Dragons/Vic Metro)
A big improver this year, Hotton had some monster games in the early part of the season playing a variety of roles. He took his endurance to another level over the off-season, opening the door for more midfield minutes after spending most of last year across half-forward. The son of former Carlton and Collingwood player Trent, Hotton is dangerous and creative when in the forward half and averaged 28.7 disposals and 1.7 goals from his first three Coates Talent League games this year. Those performances saw him included as an injury replacement player for the AFL Academy’s first exhibition match against Coburg in April, where he again impressed with 18 disposals and two goals. Hotton will miss the rest of the year after rupturing his ACL at training in May, but he is still expected to be a high draft pick in November.

Matt Whitlock’s versatility stands out. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
10. Matt Whitlock (Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country)
A 197cm key position player, Whitlock has shown incredible ability at both ends of the ground this year. He started the season in defence for the Bushrangers, averaging 16.7 disposals, seven marks and 2.7 spoils across the first three games. Whitlock was then shifted forward and kicked five goals in his first game, before bagging another five majors just a few weeks later. He received a late call-up as an injury replacement player for the AFL Academy’s second match against Footscray VFL in April, where he was again able to show some exciting signs of things to come. Whitlock has a great ability to read the play, is impressive one-on-one, plucks plenty of nice overhead marks and generally uses the ball well.

Sam Lalor kicked seven goals in a recent school footy game. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
11. Sam Lalor (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
The strong, bullocking midfielder has struggled for continuity in his draft year, sidelined in the pre-season with a hip injury and then encountering niggles in his foot and quad since. He showed off his forward craft in his first game of 2024 in APS football with Geelong Grammar, booting seven goals – six of those coming in the second half. Lalor played two games for Vic Country last season, tallying 17 disposals and eight clearances on debut, and averaged 20 disposals and eight tackles per game last year for the GWV Rebels.

Sam Marshall has made a strong start to the national carnival. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
12. Sam Marshall (Brisbane Lions Academy/Allies)
A 185cm midfielder from the Sunshine Coast, Marshall relocated to Victoria for school and has linked up the Sandringham Dragons. However, he is playing for the Allies in the national championships and has made an eye-catching start to the tournament. Across the first two matches for the Allies, Marshall averaged 28.5 disposals, 5.5 marks, 4.5 clearances and 5.5 score involvements. An elite runner, he knows how to find the footy, makes good decisions with ball in hand and can hit the scoreboard. Along with playing onball, he has also spent time on a wing and across halfback this year. The Brisbane Lions will have first access to him in the draft as a member of their Academy.

Tom Gross takes possession during a game for the AFL Academy. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
13. Tom Gross (Oakleigh Chargers/Vic Metro)
An explosive and powerful 181cm midfielder-forward, Gross can impact games in a number of ways. He is dangerous around stoppages with his burst speed and isn’t afraid to take the game on, while he is also a strong overhead mark and can push forward and hit the scoreboard. Gross was lively with 21 disposals in the AFL Academy’s first game against Coburg in April. He missed the side’s second match through injury, but has averaged 24.7 disposals, four clearances, four marks, 6.7 score involvements and one goal from three matches for the Chargers so far this season, along with juggling school football duties for Trinity Grammar.

Jack Whitlock and his brother Matt are both rated top prospects. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
14. Jack Whitlock (Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country)
Whitlock started his season with bang, booting 4.4 from 20 disposals, which saw him parachuted into the AFL Academy game. The rangy 200cm key forward kicked two goals in a solid showing against Coburg and has 10 majors across five matches for the Murray Bushrangers. Has been overshadowed by his twin brother of late, but there isn’t much separating the promising pair.
15. Joe Berry (Murray Bushrangers/Vic Country)
An early-season bolter, 180cm forward Berry has certainly had an impact for the Bushrangers in the first half of the Coates Talent League season. The left-footer possesses blistering high-end speed, brings great creativity around goal, has one-touch hands at ground level and works hard up the ground to find the footy. Berry has kicked four goals on four separate occasions for the Bushrangers this year and sits as the leading goalkicker in the Coates Talent League, outside of mid-season draftee Will McLachlan.

Noah Mraz is a Pies fan who models his game on Darcy Moore. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
16. Noah Mraz (Dandenong Stingrays/Vic Country)
A Pies fan who got the chance to train with his heroes over the summer, Mraz has moulded his game on Darcy Moore — and there are certainly some similarities with his reading of the play and efficient kicking at 198cm. The Stingrays defender will miss another couple of months with a navicular foot issue, which he played through in four games in the Talent League and for the AFL Academy. He remains one of the best key backs in the pool.

Ben Campeoreale is surging up draft boards. Picture: Sarah Reed/AFL Photos via Getty Images
17. Ben Camporeale (Glenelg/SA)
The Carlton father-son prospect staked his claim as an early pick with a best-on-ground display in the U17 Futures game on grand final day last year. And he started the national championships in impressive fashion, winning 27 disposals, 19 uncontested possessions and six clearances in the Croweaters’ win over the Allies. The 186cm playmaker has a booming kick and can find the ball on the inside and outside.

Jobe Shanahan in a contested against Footscray’s Lachlan Smith. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
18. Jobe Shanahan (Bendigo Pioneers/Allies)
An exciting and athletic 194cm key forward, Shanahan is strong in the air, works hard up the ground and can kick a nice goal. He primarily played in defence with the Pioneers last year, but has been settled as a forward this season and booted four goals in his second Coates Talent League game of the year against the Murray Bushrangers. Shanahan also showed some good signs for the AFL Academy side in two exhibition matches in April, across which he kicked a total of three goals. Hailing from the NSW border town of Moama, Shanahan is representing the Allies in the national championships and impressed with 11 disposals, five marks (three contested), seven score involvements and two goals in the side’s second match against Western Australia.

Bo Allan handballs. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
19. Bo Allan (Peel Thunder/WA)
Allan looks to be the top West Australian in a pool light on for top-end WA talent. The 191cm played the first two games of the WAFL senior season for Peel Thunder and played all four games for WA as a bottom-ager at last year’s championships. A defender or midfielder, Allan is athletic, competitive and reads the play well. Missed the first champs game with injury, but will be pivotal to WA’s when he is back out on the park.
20. Harry O’Farrell (Calder Cannons/Vic Metro)
A 196cm key defender who reads the ball well and is an exceptional athlete, O’Farrell’s aerial ability is his biggest strength. He has clean hands overhead and can work off his opponent to take intercepts or win contested marks in a pack. O’Farrell’s size and mobility allow him to match up on a range of opponents, which included Jed Walter when he was playing as a bottom-age player in the national championships last year. O’Farrell looks up to GWS star Harry Himmelberg and is working on being able to play at both ends of the ground. He showed glimpses in the first AFL Academy match in April, but missed the second game with a calf injury.

Isaac Kako is one of the draft pool’s most exciting talents. Picture: Daniel Pockett/AFL Photos/via Getty Images
21. Isaac Kako (Calder/Cannons)
Kako is one of the most enjoyable prospects to watch in the draft pool. He is dangerous around goal, has speed to burn and can fly high for a mark. His goalkicking has let him down this year, kicking 14.21 for the season, but he has had plenty of forward-half impact, averaging 18 disposals and eight score involvements this season. Kako is part of Essendon’s Next Generation Academy and is of Iraqi descent.

Jonty Faull with Jacob Hopper and Tarkyn Lockyer. Picture: Dylan Burns/AFL Photos via Getty Images
22. Jonty Faull (GWV Rebels/Vic Country)
A stress fracture in his lower back sidelined this 195cm key forward for the first half of the season, but he returned in style for the Rebels in round 10 of the Coates Talent League. Faull bagged 5.2 from 14 disposals and four marks in attack, reminding scouts what he is capable of. A Carlton supporter who looks up to Charlie Curnow, Faull is agile and strong overhead. As a bottom-age player with the Rebels, he averaged 13.1 disposals and booted 20 goals across 12 games. Faull could well climb these rankings with a big national championships campaign.

Logan Smith is the standout ruckman in this year’s draft pool. Picture: Sarah Reed/AFL Photos via Getty Images
23. Logan Smith (GWS Academy/Allies)
Smith shapes as the best pure ruckman in the pool. The Giants Academy prospect has dominated at Coates League level, averaging 27 hit-outs, 18 disposals and six clearances and has been solid in the Allies’ two national championships outings to date. Smith has a great leap and follows up well at ground level.

Xavier Lindsay has been a standout for Gippsland Power. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
24. Xavier Lindsay (Gippsland Power/Vic Country)
Lindsay has led the way for the Gippsland Power this season and has had significant impact forward of centre, averaging 26 disposals, seven score involvements and seven clearances per game. The Power midfielder enjoys getting his hands dirty and has a burst of speed from congestion that hurts opposition sides.

Tobie Travaglia on the burst. Picture: Michael Willson/AFL Photos via Getty Images
25. Tobie Travaglia (Bendigo Pioneers/Vic Country)
Travaglia has had a superb start to the year for the Pioneers, earning him a call-up to the AFL Academy side. The speedster impressed with 15 disposals and four marks across halfback, and he has averaged 25 disposals, five marks and five tackles as a midfielder in the Talent League. He has gamebreaking qualities and his stocks will only rise if he can put together a strong national carnival.
 
Is it a bad thing to WANT Bailey Smith to go to give us a chance at getting Trainor? :smile:
 
We wouldn't be a chance anyway, he will go top 5.

Could even be the number 1 pick according to Twomey. I guess North have to pick a tall eventually.

Plenty of key backs to pick from by the look of it. I quite liked the look of O'Farrell last year. Matt Whitlock looked pretty good down back in the Footscray game also.

I'd be leaning more towards a small/medium this year if we can though.
 
Could even be the number 1 pick according to Twomey. I guess North have to pick a tall eventually.

Plenty of key backs to pick from by the look of it. I quite liked the look of O'Farrell last year. Matt Whitlock looked pretty good down back in the Footscray game also.

I'd be leaning more towards a small/medium this year if we can though.
Mraz is my pick if we lose Busslinger and looks to be sliding so could be in that early second range. Late in the draft I like Oliver Hannaford as Duryea replacement.

If we were to get an early pick for B.Smith (not saying he is leaving) Christian Moraes will be the target.
 
Mraz is my pick if we lose Busslinger and looks to be sliding so could be in that early second range. Late in the draft I like Oliver Hannaford as Duryea replacement.

If we were to get an early pick for B.Smith (not saying he is leaving) Christian Moraes will be the target.

Loved what I saw of Moraes last year. Haven’t followed the draft so far this year but his numbers and the RookieMe reports look impressive and he seems to be in range for the Hawks pick. I could see him rising a bit as the year goes on though.
 
Loved what I saw of Moraes last year. Haven’t followed the draft so far this year but his numbers and the RookieMe reports look impressive and he seems to be in range for the Hawks pick. I could see him rising a bit as the year goes on though.
I actually see him sliding a bit. Not necessarily because of anything he does wrong more so because others are climbing whilst he is being pushed out of the midfield so not getting the greatest opportunity to show his skills.
 

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