Current - Misogyny as a Hate Crime | BigFooty

Current Misogyny as a Hate Crime

Discussion in 'Crime' started by shellyg, Aug 5, 2018.

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Should Australia follow Nottingham's lead and make misogyny a hate crime?

  1. Yes

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. No

    3 vote(s)
    75.0%
  3. What sort of misogyny?

    1 vote(s)
    25.0%
  1. shellyg

    shellyg Community Leader

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    A hate crime (also known as a bias-motivated crime or bias crime) is a prejudice-motivated crime, an act of violence or hostility directed at another which occurs when a perpetrator targets a victim because of his or her membership (or perceived membership) in a certain group.

    In 2016, local police in the UK city of Nottingham began recording misogynist behaviour in a radical new program.

    Under the Misogyny Hate Crime policy, police received 174 reports of misogynist behaviour between April 2016 and March this year. Of these, 73 were classified as crimes and 101 as incidents.

    These accounts appear in the Misogyny Hate Crime Evaluation report, a joint project by the University of Nottingham and Nottingham Trent University that was released in June. The report recommended rolling out the program across the country to increase publicity and reporting.

    "There is clear support for the policy from both women and men in the general public and from victims," it found.

    Is misogyny a hate crime? In theory, it is.

    Most women are aware that calling out misogyny, can often make the situation worse. A clear example. See video http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-02/would-making-misogyny-a-hate-crime-help/10062642 when French student Marie Laguerre had "dirty comments" made to her by a stranger, she shouted back.

    He responded by throwing an ashtray at her and storming over to slap her in front of a cafe full of shocked bystanders.

     

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  2. shellyg

    shellyg Community Leader

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    Too hard.
     
  3. GreyCrow

    GreyCrow Hall of Famer

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    Is this a valid use of police resources? In the above example the assault most definitely warrants police attention. The language towards her doesnt. Society itself should police it. If other customers didnt stand up then thats on their conscience
     
  4. SmAshmoto

    SmAshmoto Team Captain

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    Policing peoples language is an outright attack on free speech, one of the core values of Western society. If I wanted to be told what I could say or feel, I'd live in North Korea.
     
  5. shellyg

    shellyg Community Leader

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    The Nottingham policy I think is more about awareness rather than a drive to start dragging people into court for eg. unwanted sexual advances or stalky behaviour over social media.

    Most women know that if you go up against a guy who's driven by misogynistic hatred, you could end up like the girl in the clip. It's hard to rise above sometimes and say nothing, even over social media when I've challenged or given them a dose of their own they come for me.
     
  6. shellyg

    shellyg Community Leader

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    It doesn't appear to be but in the long term it might imo even if I think it seems to be a bit over the top. It's about awareness and changing attitudes.
     
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