Competitions "Dead Set Legend" of the day.

ferball

Premium Platinum
Jul 24, 2015
13,805
25,487
AFL Club
North Melbourne
I'm so sick of campaigners saying this. Its got nothing to do with Greenies and the government and everything to do with having the personnel to do the burns and an effective window to do it.
Some of these idiots just light up and let the ******* fire go with no idea where PR when it's gonna stop and who is in the way.
That campaigner probably lives in the city and brought his hat at a tourist shop.
Meanwhile I'm off to do another 15 hours unpaid work on the fire front.
 

D23D

Premium Platinum
Apr 27, 2008
1,471
3,010
Brisbane
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Not sure of the accuracy but I heard that Parks NSW only back-burned 130,000 hectares last financial year because the LNP government sacked a third of their staff.
In Queensland we have 800 rangers and back burned 1.1 million hectares in the past financial year.
He must have been from NSW!
 

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ferball

Premium Platinum
Jul 24, 2015
13,805
25,487
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Not sure of the accuracy but I heard that Parks NSW only back-burned 130,000 hectares last financial year because the LNP government sacked a third of their staff.
In Queensland we have 800 rangers and back burned 1.1 million hectares in the past financial year.
He must have been from NSW!
Shitloads of NSW is in drought. That's why Parks aren't burning.

If not burning when its questionable as to whether or not the burn is containable is "government not letting me burn" then yes that happens in the fire season. Ouside the fire season you can burn what you want on your place provided you tell your neighbours and local fire brigade or the FCC. And that is so when someone calls up 000 saying "there is smoke at such and such" there isn't a response to put it out.
 

ferball

Premium Platinum
Jul 24, 2015
13,805
25,487
AFL Club
North Melbourne
And on that note my dead set legends of last Wednesday were the mad rednecks I was working with out the back of woop woop somewhere.

Walking around the fire line in their fu**en cowboy hats.

Way too keen to light up but after we let them a koala started trying to walk its way out of the area we were burning. It saw us and climbed up the first free it could cope with. They stopped burning, cleared and wet round his tree and made sure the fire round it was cool.

The poor thing had burned feet but had climbed with its hands up a small tree as far as it could. They sprayed water on its feet (gently) and looked after it. Held up our burn for an hour (which was a pita but worth it.) I'll never forget these guys sheepishly saying "I'm not a Greenie but i'd hate to see the little fella get cooked" and "How many of its mates and other little critters have been fried already, even today" in a variety of different ways to each other every time they got sheepish about being so gentle and compassionate about an animal in front of each other.

Legends.

(It happened the day Tef put that idiots rant up. They'd probably agree in principle even tho they don't in practise.)
 

DarwinRoo

Brownlow Medallist
Mar 10, 2007
22,617
8,807
Darwin
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
South Dragons, Storm.
19/11/2019

*strong language warning*

RWNJ (Keira Savage) shares video of moron with no idea.

Let’s blame the party that has fu** all to do with budgets and funding cuts. The member for Melbourne is really to blame for NSW liberal party decisions. 🙄
 
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ferball

Premium Platinum
Jul 24, 2015
13,805
25,487
AFL Club
North Melbourne
RWNJ (Keira Savage) shares video of moron with no idea.

Let’s blame the party that has fu** all to do with budgets and funding cuts. The member for Melbourne is really to blame for NSW liberal party decisions. 🙄
I have been a member of the Wytaliba community near Glen Innes for 40 years.
We lost two of our community members in last Friday's bushfires, and the father of my great grandson is in Royal North Shore Hospital being treated for severe burns while trying to save his house and his deceased neighbour.

Nearly 50 per cent of our able adults are members of the Wytaliba RFS, a figure envied by many other brigades. Over those 40 years on our 3500-acre property, we have had more than a dozen out-of-control bushfires that were successfully controlled, the majority in recent years.
Over the last three years, in co-operation with NSW Forestry, National Parks and the RFS, we have had very extensive controlled burning in the state forest and national park on our perimeter.
On September 14, after an outbreak of fires across the Northern Tablelands, high winds caused embers to spot more than 10 kilometres onto the the centre of Wytaliba.

After an initial emergency the fire weather abated, but over the next week the fire spread across much of the property.
In a large operation more than 20 RFS trucks, more than 100 fire fighters, bulldozers and waterbombers were successfully deployed to help defend our homes. All were saved. Much of Wytaliba was blacked out.
Carol (Glen Innes mayor with 20 year RFS service medal) and I have a large cleared area around our double brick house.
That September fire burned to our perimeter. This was just two months ago.
Everything that should be done, was done and lots more.

The fire that came last Friday was of another order of magnitude altogether. A crown fire roaring in from the west on a hot afternoon with an 80km per hour wind, it wasn't on the ground, it was a firestorm in the air, raining fire.
There was no fuel on the ground, it was already burned.

The heat ahead of the fire front ignited nearly everything in its path.
Before he saw any flame my neighbor's car exploded. They just escaped with their lives...see live footage on Monday's ABC 7.30.
Our house was severely damaged but not destroyed. We weren't home. Others were not so lucky.
Wytaliba has lost two lives and more than half our homes, our school, our bridge our wildlife and 40 years of work to build a community. What was our paradise is now ash.
Thanks to the heroics of Wytaliba RFS and residents, and the Reddestone RFS who incredibly crossed the burning bridge to help us, some was saved.
"Today's not the day to talk about climate change".....No, yesterday was the day, or the day before, or the month before, or the year before,....but it didn't get a mention.
Now we have the reality and the mention it gets is, "don't talk about it now".
So, the politicians (and the media) turn the talk to hazard reduction burns, or the lack of them, as something else to blame on the inner-city raving lunatics.
We had a bushfire two months ago that burned most of our property. It didn't matter. It burned again.
This is climate changed. We're in the worst drought recorded. A million hectares of bush has burned. Barnaby says it's Green voters and the sun's magnetic field.
Pray for rain, pray harder for leadership.

 

andana

Norm Smith Medallist
Feb 1, 2008
6,516
7,026
Thailand
AFL Club
North Melbourne
1574919157324.png



SUKABUMI: Indonesia's notorious traffic gridlock has been known to send commuters into a spin, but one man has decided to rise above the daily grind - by building his very own helicopter.
Jujun Junaedi spends his free time in a backyard tinkering with his project, guided by instructional videos, as he dreams of flying above the snarled roads of his hometown Sukabumi.

"It's so incredibly frustrating. You run out of petrol and it's a waste of time," the 42-year-old says of congestion in the city, about 110km south of the capital Jakarta.
 

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Hojuman

Norm Smith Medallist
May 20, 2012
8,126
20,278
Seoul
AFL Club
North Melbourne
View attachment 786145


SUKABUMI: Indonesia's notorious traffic gridlock has been known to send commuters into a spin, but one man has decided to rise above the daily grind - by building his very own helicopter.
Jujun Junaedi spends his free time in a backyard tinkering with his project, guided by instructional videos, as he dreams of flying above the snarled roads of his hometown Sukabumi.

"It's so incredibly frustrating. You run out of petrol and it's a waste of time," the 42-year-old says of congestion in the city, about 110km south of the capital Jakarta.


I've sat in Puncak / Sukabumi traffic many times. I'm with helicopter guy.
 

The Dingrel

Club Legend
Jun 25, 2013
2,273
2,982
Brisbane
AFL Club
North Melbourne
Other Teams
Brisbane Bandits
11/11/2019: Lest We Forget

John "Barney" Hines, "The Souvenir King"

John "Barney" Hines (1878–1958) was a British-born Australian soldier of World War I, known for his prowess at taking items from German soldiers. Hines was the subject of a famous photo taken by Frank Hurley that depicted him surrounded by German military equipment and money he had looted during the Battle of Polygon Wood in September 1917. This image is among the best-known Australian photographs of the war.

View attachment 777525

Born in Liverpool, England, in 1878, Hines served in the British Army and Royal Navy, and worked in several occupations. He arrived in Australia in 1915 and volunteered for the Australian Imperial Force in August 1915. Although discharged due to poor health in early 1916, he rejoined in August that year and served on the WEstern Front from March 1917 to mid-1918, when he was discharged again for health reasons. During his period in France he proved to be an aggressive soldier, and gained fame for the collection of items that he amassed, but was undisciplined when not in combat and frequently punished.

Private Hines was a thief and scrounger with a propensity for violence that verged on the psychopathic. But in a place where even brave men were terrified, especially of showing fear, he seemed nerveless.

On description he seems somewhere between “Chopper” Read, legendary Carlton hard man John “Big Nick” Nicholls and Chief Bromden in One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest. He also happened to be one of the most deadly infantrymen of the war.

At a time when hardly anyone but sailors had tattoos, “Barney” had plenty. At a time when most “bronzed Anzacs” were in fact much smaller than their own grandsons are now, he was regarded as big – a touch under six foot (1.82m) but a genuine “14 stone” (89kg) heavyweight with a barrel chest and muscle from a lifetime of manual labour.

He had black hair, dark eyes and a look that made people nervous.

The Diggers called him “Wild Eyes” and the “Souvenir King” because even in an army with its share of thieves, scallywags and “foragers”, he stood out. Among young recruits, he was a seasoned veteran. When he first enlisted in 1915 he claimed to be 28. He was in fact 42 and had been fending for himself for 30 years, as a seaman, a labourer, a Boer War guide and other things all over the world.

The army discharged him after a few months training because even a big, strong man couldn’t go to war with haemorrhoids. But he re-enlisted later in 1916. This time he said he was 36 and the authorities weren’t so choosy because the Western Front was mincing up tens of thousands of men. He got to France as a 45th Battalion reinforcement in time for the slaughter of 1917.

In a battlefield of horrors beyond imagination, Hines seemed to reduce brutal combat to a sort of macabre sport. “Souveniring” German loot was maybe a way of keeping score, a logical thing to do in a place with no logic, where men lived miserably and died terribly and at random.

He killed and captured dozens of Germans because he was good at it and he robbed them because he needed the money. He’d had his pay docked so often for brawling, drinking and going absent without leave that he was effectively fighting for nothing.

In civilian life he could have made the ideal standover man or rogue cop, with a pistol in his belt, a roll of cash in his pocket and the sort of fearlessness that’s impossible to fake. His fame spread beyond his own battalion as stories of his exploits passed along the lines.

The stories lasted as long as his generation of Diggers did. When they died out, so did the legend. “Wild Eyes” wasn’t as romantic as “Simpson” and his donkey. He wasn’t officer material and contemporary war historians and correspondents weren’t going to praise such a vulgar character. They didn’t give medals to men like him.

When Maria Cameron of Port Fairy began researching the life of her husband’s war hero uncle, Simon Fraser, she discovered the half-forgotten story of Barney Hines. She was in a café in Pozieres in 2006 when she saw French men wearing tee-shirts with an old photograph of a fearsome-looking soldier printed on them. The hulking figure in the photograph is wearing a German forage cap, holding a wad of banknotes and surrounded by a pile of looted goods – a “Hun” helmet, binoculars, rifle, water bottles, bandoliers and knapsacks jammed with jewellery, watches and a bag full of Iron Crosses. The photograph was taken on 27 September 1917, the morning after the battle opened at Polygon Wood.

This was Maria Cameron’s first glimpse of a rogue soldier famous among his fellow troops and still a folk hero in northern France. There might have been snipers with more known “kills” but some suggest Hines singlehandedly killed or captured more Germans than any other foot soldier — and certainly robbed more of them. “He’s the Ned Kelly of the First World War.” Cameron says. “And still a legend over there.”

Hines’ most audacious act was to charge a German pill box, dance on top of it then throw two “Mills bombs” (early hand grenades) through the gun slits.

After the smoke cleared, he captured the 63 shaken Germans who survived the blasts and came out with their hands up. Later the same day, he went back into the field and “knocked out” a German machine gun post.

He preferred to leave his rifle behind and make solo raids lugging two bags stuffed full of “bombs”.

The bags came in handy for bringing back loot.

The stories are many and might even be true. Such as the time Hines “found” a grandfather clock and put it in a dugout until his own troops blew it to pieces because the chimes gave away their position. Another time he returned from Amiens with suitcases full of French francs, apparently “found” in a bank. British military police arrested him but he caused so much trouble he was returned to his unit.

At Passchendaele, a shell burst killed every man in his Lewis gun crew. Hines was thrown 20 metres, had the soles ripped from his boots but still managed to crawl back and keep firing until he fainted from his wounds. After he recovered in hospital he returned, to be wounded again and gassed.

Hines' enthusiasm for collecting German military equipment and German soldiers' personal possessions became well known within and possibly outside of his battalion, and earned him the nickname of "Souvenir King".
Although he collected some items from battlefields at Ypres and the Somme region, most were stolen from German prisoner of war. He kept the items he collected for himself, and there are no records of any being handed over to the Australian War Records Section, the AIF unit responsible for collecting items for later display in Australia. Hines sold some of the items he collected to other soldiers, including for alcohol.

He was sent back to Australia a month before the Armistice and discharged in 1919. He went back to doing the best he could – droving, prospecting and timber cutting – but in the 1930s was camping in a hessian humpy on the western outskirts of Sydney. His old army mates took up a collection to help him but peace didn’t suit the old war dog.

When a new war broke out in 1939 he tried to join up again, aged 66, but this time he couldn’t fib his way in. “Barney” died broke in 1958 at 85. Now, he looks like a candidate to be a belated Aussie hero except for one problem. He was born and bred in Liverpool and didn’t reach Australia until he was in his 30s.

But the Poms can’t claim him, either. He was Irish.

Even in an army with its share of thieves and scallywags he stood out.

The photograph of Hines at the Battle of Polygon Wood was published in late 1917 under the title Wild Eye, the souvenir king and became one of the best-known Australian photographs of the war. Many soldiers identified with Hines and were amused by his collection of souvenirs. The photograph was used as propaganda, and a false story developed that the German Kaiser Wilhelm II had become enraged after seeing it.

Away from the front line, Hines developed a record of indiscipline. He was court martialled on nine occasions for drunkenness, impeding military police, forging entries in his pay book and being absent without leave. He also claimed to have been caught robbing the strongroom of a bank in Amiens, though this is not recorded in his Army service record. As a result of these convictions, Hines lost several promotions he had earned for his acts of bravery.He was also fined on several occasions, and the resulting need for money may have been one of the factors that motivated his looting. A member of the 3rd Battalion described Hines as "not normally a weak man but rather one ... uncontrolled". An officer from the 45th Battalion stated after the war that Hines had been "two pains in the neck".
Would make a good movie.
 

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