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Farang83150

Norm Smith Medallist
May 23, 2010
9,477
8,380
Chalong 83130
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
Perth (Demons)
Having praise heaped on us by Buckenara's actually not a good thing, loved him as a FWD for us in our SO sides but his opinions have turned out to be so far off the mark at times it's scary that he's given us a big thumbs up for next season..😰😰
 

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squashface

Masten and Waterman
Feb 26, 2012
10,607
25,473
Perth
AFL Club
West Coast
Everyone is going to hate me for this but I haven't been able to bring myself to watch a single episode of that Friends, Family, Flags series. Too much annoyance about how the next two seasons played out (including the Rioli suspension, DV concussion, not even being able to make it to a prelim two years straight after winning a flag and now Jetta being cut etc) have stopped me from being able to go back and reminisce.
 

Altum Volantes

92 - 94 - 06 - 18
Aug 4, 2003
18,716
14,020
WA
AFL Club
West Coast
Everyone is going to hate me for this but I haven't been able to bring myself to watch a single episode of that Friends, Family, Flags series. Too much annoyance about how the next two seasons played out (including the Rioli suspension, DV concussion, not even being able to make it to a prelim two years straight after winning a flag and now Jetta being cut etc) have stopped me from being able to go back and reminisce.
pffft this sh*t has had NOTHING on 2007.
 

Rowan18

Club Legend
Feb 20, 2018
2,946
5,345
AFL Club
West Coast
Wow how cringe was the part with McGowan pretending to have a clue about footy.
Lol - I don't think he was pretending, he just didn't really care. He said at one point that he actually went to the prelim with his boys, implying that he had already told them he didn't watch many games.
 

flamingEMBERS

Norm Smith Medallist
Sep 8, 2011
9,948
8,837
AFL Club
West Coast
Everyone is going to hate me for this but I haven't been able to bring myself to watch a single episode of that Friends, Family, Flags series. Too much annoyance about how the next two seasons played out (including the Rioli suspension, DV concussion, not even being able to make it to a prelim two years straight after winning a flag and now Jetta being cut etc) have stopped me from being able to go back and reminisce.
I’m sorta with you on this though still watched just not the last two eps yet. The Thing that pisses me off about it is they should have done a proper version like this after the 2018 season. Instead we got a sh*t 10 min version with 6 players all looking hungover.

Now fast forward 18 months and in the middle of a pandemic we have current player reminiscing about 2018. campaigners go out and focus on 2020. Almost seemed as though that was their mountain and happy with it.
 

Chris_6678

Brownlow Medallist
Oct 29, 2007
18,286
22,089
Perth Western Australia
AFL Club
West Coast
I’m sorta with you on this though still watched just not the last two eps yet. The Thing that pisses me off about it is they should have done a proper version like this after the 2018 season. Instead we got a sh*t 10 min version with 6 players all looking hungover.

Now fast forward 18 months and in the middle of a pandemic we have current player reminiscing about 2018. campaigners go out and focus on 2020. Almost seemed as though that was their mountain and happy with it.
I think most of it was filmed at the end of 2019 as they refer to the missed opportunity in 2019 quite a bit.

This sort of thing should have as you said been released straight after.
 

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Art OF war

Club Legend
May 5, 2008
1,458
1,987
Perth
AFL Club
West Coast
I think most of it was filmed at the end of 2019 as they refer to the missed opportunity in 2019 quite a bit.

This sort of thing should have as you said been released straight after.
It was predominantly filmed in the covid lockdown period. Club got together and thought about how to still have content and engage fans, especially if the season was going to be a "no go"
 

Tugga27

Premiership Player
Jun 19, 2017
4,180
5,573
AFL Club
West Coast
Some good idea's and bad ones from the wily old fox.

I like 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.


Kevin Sheedy column: 12 rule changes to save the game
Why are so many people afraid of change?
If you are afraid of change, throw away your mobile phone and give away your computer.
If you think change doesn’t matter, you would still have six o’clock closing for pubs and shops, and we wouldn’t have mandatory seat belts, speeding laws, or .05 drink drive regulations to keep us safe.
Nothing stays the same forever, and neither should it.
The AFL this week announced three changes for the 2021 season — cutting interchange rotations from 90 to 75 per side; a tighter rein on players on the mark; and the mark moved from 10m out from the goalsquare for kick-ins to 15m.




Here are some changes I’d urge the AFL to consider in order to make the game more attractive.

1. BANISH BOUNDARY THROW-INS
Boundary throw-ins are a blight on the game.
You get two ruckmen wrestling and whacking the ball back in the direction of the boundary line. Too often all we get is another boundary throw-in.
That makes for ugly footy.
I’d propose when the ball goes out of bounds we should bring it 15-20m in from point of exit and have the boundary umpire throw it up instead.
The ruckmen, instead of facing the boundary line, would be facing their team’s end, potentially allowing for an easier exit from a stoppage.
The ball would be closer to the corridor, too, and further away from the dead zone of the boundary.
It would also mean no more wrestling from the ruckmen.
Just imagine the pressure when the ball comes in 15-20m deep when it goes out of bounds close to goal.
The forwards would sense an opportunity, the backs would be on edge.
How much excitement would that make for the fans and the players!
2. BRING BACK THE FLICK PASS
Hear me out on this one, I haven’t gone mad.
The flick pass was a tactic of years past when players used to flick the ball out with an open hand rather than use a fist in a handball to move it on.
It gained prominence in the early 1920s before being banned before the start of the 1925 season.
It was reinstated in 1934 and worked across three decades before being outlawed again in the middle of 1966.
The legendary Smith brothers argued over it. Len Smith loved it; Norm Smith wanted it banned.
I’d love to see it come back.
We laud great tap-ons in general play, we love it when ruckmen palm the ball out of the ruck, yet we don’t allow players to flick the ball with an open hand.
If we brought it back, it would speed up the game, and keep the play flowing.
Besides, it happens anyway — remember the “Crow throw”? — and the sleight of hand means the umpires almost always miss it.
3. DITCH THE WINGS
This might be too radical for the AFL, but I’d cut the on-field numbers back to 16 per side, and ditch the wings.
If the players association gets annoyed, then the extra two players could be added to an interchange bench of six.
Most wingmen these days aren’t wingmen in a traditional sense. They are pseudo defenders who push back to fill up space and help in the backline.
Losing them from the field would open up the space on the ground and take away some of the congestion.
We’ve seen this before in the old VFA and 16 players per side promotes skill, space and hard running.
It might even bring about more goals.
4. RETURN TO 20-MINUTE QUARTERS
Let’s go back to 20 minutes per quarter.
We understand why the AFL had to cut it back to 16 minutes this season, due to COVID, but it just didn’t feel right.
We don’t know what the footy landscape will look like in 2021, depending on what happens with COVID, but returning to 20 minutes will increase fatigue.
That is almost certain to lead to less congestion and more scoring opportunities.
5. KEEP CUTTING ROTATIONS
This one’s for you, KB.
If the AFL is too conservative to cut the wings out, then it needs to keep cutting interchange rotations.
I would be OK cutting the numbers back to 50, if they keep the playing numbers to 18 per side on the field at any one time.
We must keep the stars out on the ground for longer.
There is nothing more annoying than seeing a star kick a goal and then come off for a rotation.
Just imagine that happening in the English Premier League!
6. BRING IN A 25M PENALTY
A 50m penalty is too harsh for most indiscretions these days.
It also slows the game down, as the players push back as it is unfolding.
Sure, if a bloke whacks an opponent deliberately, the umpires should have the lever to apply a 50m penalty.
But for the most part, a 25m penalty is the appropriate outcome.
7. RAISE THE DISTANCE FOR A MARK TO 20M
It is time we pushed the distance required for marks out to 20m.
This will stop the little chip kicks that no one likes.
Increasing the distance puts the pressure back on the kicker with the risk of turnover — as long as the umpires strictly police the rule.
8. NO MARK WHEN KICKING BACKWARDS
Let’s change the rule governing marks, which would see backward kicks on the defensive side of the centre line being deemed play-on.
This would put an end to the time-wasting tactic that every team uses, particularly late in matches, and that annoys footy fans so much.
No one wants to see the clock being run down.
So if we take away the opportunity by outlawing marks from kicks on the defensive side of the centre, it can only be a good thing for the look of the game.

9. KICK-IN CHANGES
I would put the pressure on the player kicking the ball back into play after a behind.
If the kicker wants to go outside the goalsquare before taking his kick, he should then be compelled to kick the ball to the 50m defensive line.
If he then goes short to a teammate, it would be deemed play-on by the umpire.
But if the kicker chooses to kick it from inside the goalsquare, he can pass it short to a teammate where it would be called a mark.
10. BE RUTHLESS ON SCRAGGING AND HOLDING THE BALL
Give some power back to the umpires.
Let’s follow the rugby league rule where you can’t touch players with force unless they have the ball.
We don’t want to see our star players getting scragged.
If the umpires are ruthless, the scragging will stop.
The same should happen with holding the ball decisions.
If a player doesn’t hit the ball out when he goes ground — let’s say after three or four seconds — pay holding the ball against him.
That will stop a third, fourth and fifth man coming in to form a maul.
11. PROTECT THE HEAD
The sling tackle must be stopped. By and large, it has been, if you leave aside the ridiculous decision to let Shaun Burgoyne off his charge this year.
But we also need to legislate to prevent players from running back with the flight of the ball and getting crunched.
Sooner or later, someone is going to be seriously injured, or potentially even die from such an incident.
We admire players for their courage in doing it, but we have to protect them from themselves.
It must be a worry for AFL legal counsel Andrew Dillon and for the AFL.
I don’t know how we can change this, but the onus is on the AFL to do it before somebody gets seriously hurt.
12. DON’T HAVE COACHES ON RULE CHANGE PANELS
Coaches are control freaks. I know, because I used to be one.
So the most important thing in any assessment of possible rule changes is to ensure we don’t have current day coaches on rules panels.
I’ve got no problem with past coaches on panels, but it makes no sense to have the current ones controlling the narrative.
Their job is to try and win games, not worry about the image of the game itself.
They have been a part of the problem, so they don’t deserve to be part of the solution.
 

Avalor

Brownlow Medallist
Aug 15, 2009
10,645
5,530
Jakarta
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
East Perth, Donnybrook, Chelsea
Some good idea's and bad ones from the wily old fox.

I like 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.


Kevin Sheedy column: 12 rule changes to save the game
Why are so many people afraid of change?
If you are afraid of change, throw away your mobile phone and give away your computer.
If you think change doesn’t matter, you would still have six o’clock closing for pubs and shops, and we wouldn’t have mandatory seat belts, speeding laws, or .05 drink drive regulations to keep us safe.
Nothing stays the same forever, and neither should it.
The AFL this week announced three changes for the 2021 season — cutting interchange rotations from 90 to 75 per side; a tighter rein on players on the mark; and the mark moved from 10m out from the goalsquare for kick-ins to 15m.




Here are some changes I’d urge the AFL to consider in order to make the game more attractive.

1. BANISH BOUNDARY THROW-INS
Boundary throw-ins are a blight on the game.
You get two ruckmen wrestling and whacking the ball back in the direction of the boundary line. Too often all we get is another boundary throw-in.
That makes for ugly footy.
I’d propose when the ball goes out of bounds we should bring it 15-20m in from point of exit and have the boundary umpire throw it up instead.
The ruckmen, instead of facing the boundary line, would be facing their team’s end, potentially allowing for an easier exit from a stoppage.
The ball would be closer to the corridor, too, and further away from the dead zone of the boundary.
It would also mean no more wrestling from the ruckmen.
Just imagine the pressure when the ball comes in 15-20m deep when it goes out of bounds close to goal.
The forwards would sense an opportunity, the backs would be on edge.
How much excitement would that make for the fans and the players!
2. BRING BACK THE FLICK PASS
Hear me out on this one, I haven’t gone mad.
The flick pass was a tactic of years past when players used to flick the ball out with an open hand rather than use a fist in a handball to move it on.
It gained prominence in the early 1920s before being banned before the start of the 1925 season.
It was reinstated in 1934 and worked across three decades before being outlawed again in the middle of 1966.
The legendary Smith brothers argued over it. Len Smith loved it; Norm Smith wanted it banned.
I’d love to see it come back.
We laud great tap-ons in general play, we love it when ruckmen palm the ball out of the ruck, yet we don’t allow players to flick the ball with an open hand.
If we brought it back, it would speed up the game, and keep the play flowing.
Besides, it happens anyway — remember the “Crow throw”? — and the sleight of hand means the umpires almost always miss it.
3. DITCH THE WINGS
This might be too radical for the AFL, but I’d cut the on-field numbers back to 16 per side, and ditch the wings.
If the players association gets annoyed, then the extra two players could be added to an interchange bench of six.
Most wingmen these days aren’t wingmen in a traditional sense. They are pseudo defenders who push back to fill up space and help in the backline.
Losing them from the field would open up the space on the ground and take away some of the congestion.
We’ve seen this before in the old VFA and 16 players per side promotes skill, space and hard running.
It might even bring about more goals.
4. RETURN TO 20-MINUTE QUARTERS
Let’s go back to 20 minutes per quarter.
We understand why the AFL had to cut it back to 16 minutes this season, due to COVID, but it just didn’t feel right.
We don’t know what the footy landscape will look like in 2021, depending on what happens with COVID, but returning to 20 minutes will increase fatigue.
That is almost certain to lead to less congestion and more scoring opportunities.
5. KEEP CUTTING ROTATIONS
This one’s for you, KB.
If the AFL is too conservative to cut the wings out, then it needs to keep cutting interchange rotations.
I would be OK cutting the numbers back to 50, if they keep the playing numbers to 18 per side on the field at any one time.
We must keep the stars out on the ground for longer.
There is nothing more annoying than seeing a star kick a goal and then come off for a rotation.
Just imagine that happening in the English Premier League!
6. BRING IN A 25M PENALTY
A 50m penalty is too harsh for most indiscretions these days.
It also slows the game down, as the players push back as it is unfolding.
Sure, if a bloke whacks an opponent deliberately, the umpires should have the lever to apply a 50m penalty.
But for the most part, a 25m penalty is the appropriate outcome.
7. RAISE THE DISTANCE FOR A MARK TO 20M
It is time we pushed the distance required for marks out to 20m.
This will stop the little chip kicks that no one likes.
Increasing the distance puts the pressure back on the kicker with the risk of turnover — as long as the umpires strictly police the rule.
8. NO MARK WHEN KICKING BACKWARDS
Let’s change the rule governing marks, which would see backward kicks on the defensive side of the centre line being deemed play-on.
This would put an end to the time-wasting tactic that every team uses, particularly late in matches, and that annoys footy fans so much.
No one wants to see the clock being run down.
So if we take away the opportunity by outlawing marks from kicks on the defensive side of the centre, it can only be a good thing for the look of the game.

9. KICK-IN CHANGES
I would put the pressure on the player kicking the ball back into play after a behind.
If the kicker wants to go outside the goalsquare before taking his kick, he should then be compelled to kick the ball to the 50m defensive line.
If he then goes short to a teammate, it would be deemed play-on by the umpire.
But if the kicker chooses to kick it from inside the goalsquare, he can pass it short to a teammate where it would be called a mark.
10. BE RUTHLESS ON SCRAGGING AND HOLDING THE BALL
Give some power back to the umpires.
Let’s follow the rugby league rule where you can’t touch players with force unless they have the ball.
We don’t want to see our star players getting scragged.
If the umpires are ruthless, the scragging will stop.
The same should happen with holding the ball decisions.
If a player doesn’t hit the ball out when he goes ground — let’s say after three or four seconds — pay holding the ball against him.
That will stop a third, fourth and fifth man coming in to form a maul.
11. PROTECT THE HEAD
The sling tackle must be stopped. By and large, it has been, if you leave aside the ridiculous decision to let Shaun Burgoyne off his charge this year.
But we also need to legislate to prevent players from running back with the flight of the ball and getting crunched.
Sooner or later, someone is going to be seriously injured, or potentially even die from such an incident.
We admire players for their courage in doing it, but we have to protect them from themselves.
It must be a worry for AFL legal counsel Andrew Dillon and for the AFL.
I don’t know how we can change this, but the onus is on the AFL to do it before somebody gets seriously hurt.
12. DON’T HAVE COACHES ON RULE CHANGE PANELS
Coaches are control freaks. I know, because I used to be one.
So the most important thing in any assessment of possible rule changes is to ensure we don’t have current day coaches on rules panels.
I’ve got no problem with past coaches on panels, but it makes no sense to have the current ones controlling the narrative.
Their job is to try and win games, not worry about the image of the game itself.
They have been a part of the problem, so they don’t deserve to be part of the solution.
Agree 100% with his ideas, except for number 9. He has good, workable solutions.
 

Keys

Looking for a cloud to yell at
Oct 11, 2006
47,180
74,660
Perth
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
Bengals
Some good idea's and bad ones from the wily old fox.

I like 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8.


Kevin Sheedy column: 12 rule changes to save the game
Why are so many people afraid of change?
If you are afraid of change, throw away your mobile phone and give away your computer.
If you think change doesn’t matter, you would still have six o’clock closing for pubs and shops, and we wouldn’t have mandatory seat belts, speeding laws, or .05 drink drive regulations to keep us safe.
Nothing stays the same forever, and neither should it.
The AFL this week announced three changes for the 2021 season — cutting interchange rotations from 90 to 75 per side; a tighter rein on players on the mark; and the mark moved from 10m out from the goalsquare for kick-ins to 15m.




Here are some changes I’d urge the AFL to consider in order to make the game more attractive.

1. BANISH BOUNDARY THROW-INS
Boundary throw-ins are a blight on the game.
You get two ruckmen wrestling and whacking the ball back in the direction of the boundary line. Too often all we get is another boundary throw-in.
That makes for ugly footy.
I’d propose when the ball goes out of bounds we should bring it 15-20m in from point of exit and have the boundary umpire throw it up instead.
The ruckmen, instead of facing the boundary line, would be facing their team’s end, potentially allowing for an easier exit from a stoppage.
The ball would be closer to the corridor, too, and further away from the dead zone of the boundary.
It would also mean no more wrestling from the ruckmen.
Just imagine the pressure when the ball comes in 15-20m deep when it goes out of bounds close to goal.
The forwards would sense an opportunity, the backs would be on edge.
How much excitement would that make for the fans and the players!
2. BRING BACK THE FLICK PASS
Hear me out on this one, I haven’t gone mad.
The flick pass was a tactic of years past when players used to flick the ball out with an open hand rather than use a fist in a handball to move it on.
It gained prominence in the early 1920s before being banned before the start of the 1925 season.
It was reinstated in 1934 and worked across three decades before being outlawed again in the middle of 1966.
The legendary Smith brothers argued over it. Len Smith loved it; Norm Smith wanted it banned.
I’d love to see it come back.
We laud great tap-ons in general play, we love it when ruckmen palm the ball out of the ruck, yet we don’t allow players to flick the ball with an open hand.
If we brought it back, it would speed up the game, and keep the play flowing.
Besides, it happens anyway — remember the “Crow throw”? — and the sleight of hand means the umpires almost always miss it.
3. DITCH THE WINGS
This might be too radical for the AFL, but I’d cut the on-field numbers back to 16 per side, and ditch the wings.
If the players association gets annoyed, then the extra two players could be added to an interchange bench of six.
Most wingmen these days aren’t wingmen in a traditional sense. They are pseudo defenders who push back to fill up space and help in the backline.
Losing them from the field would open up the space on the ground and take away some of the congestion.
We’ve seen this before in the old VFA and 16 players per side promotes skill, space and hard running.
It might even bring about more goals.
4. RETURN TO 20-MINUTE QUARTERS
Let’s go back to 20 minutes per quarter.
We understand why the AFL had to cut it back to 16 minutes this season, due to COVID, but it just didn’t feel right.
We don’t know what the footy landscape will look like in 2021, depending on what happens with COVID, but returning to 20 minutes will increase fatigue.
That is almost certain to lead to less congestion and more scoring opportunities.
5. KEEP CUTTING ROTATIONS
This one’s for you, KB.
If the AFL is too conservative to cut the wings out, then it needs to keep cutting interchange rotations.
I would be OK cutting the numbers back to 50, if they keep the playing numbers to 18 per side on the field at any one time.
We must keep the stars out on the ground for longer.
There is nothing more annoying than seeing a star kick a goal and then come off for a rotation.
Just imagine that happening in the English Premier League!
6. BRING IN A 25M PENALTY
A 50m penalty is too harsh for most indiscretions these days.
It also slows the game down, as the players push back as it is unfolding.
Sure, if a bloke whacks an opponent deliberately, the umpires should have the lever to apply a 50m penalty.
But for the most part, a 25m penalty is the appropriate outcome.
7. RAISE THE DISTANCE FOR A MARK TO 20M
It is time we pushed the distance required for marks out to 20m.
This will stop the little chip kicks that no one likes.
Increasing the distance puts the pressure back on the kicker with the risk of turnover — as long as the umpires strictly police the rule.
8. NO MARK WHEN KICKING BACKWARDS
Let’s change the rule governing marks, which would see backward kicks on the defensive side of the centre line being deemed play-on.
This would put an end to the time-wasting tactic that every team uses, particularly late in matches, and that annoys footy fans so much.
No one wants to see the clock being run down.
So if we take away the opportunity by outlawing marks from kicks on the defensive side of the centre, it can only be a good thing for the look of the game.

9. KICK-IN CHANGES
I would put the pressure on the player kicking the ball back into play after a behind.
If the kicker wants to go outside the goalsquare before taking his kick, he should then be compelled to kick the ball to the 50m defensive line.
If he then goes short to a teammate, it would be deemed play-on by the umpire.
But if the kicker chooses to kick it from inside the goalsquare, he can pass it short to a teammate where it would be called a mark.
10. BE RUTHLESS ON SCRAGGING AND HOLDING THE BALL
Give some power back to the umpires.
Let’s follow the rugby league rule where you can’t touch players with force unless they have the ball.
We don’t want to see our star players getting scragged.
If the umpires are ruthless, the scragging will stop.
The same should happen with holding the ball decisions.
If a player doesn’t hit the ball out when he goes ground — let’s say after three or four seconds — pay holding the ball against him.
That will stop a third, fourth and fifth man coming in to form a maul.
11. PROTECT THE HEAD
The sling tackle must be stopped. By and large, it has been, if you leave aside the ridiculous decision to let Shaun Burgoyne off his charge this year.
But we also need to legislate to prevent players from running back with the flight of the ball and getting crunched.
Sooner or later, someone is going to be seriously injured, or potentially even die from such an incident.
We admire players for their courage in doing it, but we have to protect them from themselves.
It must be a worry for AFL legal counsel Andrew Dillon and for the AFL.
I don’t know how we can change this, but the onus is on the AFL to do it before somebody gets seriously hurt.
12. DON’T HAVE COACHES ON RULE CHANGE PANELS
Coaches are control freaks. I know, because I used to be one.
So the most important thing in any assessment of possible rule changes is to ensure we don’t have current day coaches on rules panels.
I’ve got no problem with past coaches on panels, but it makes no sense to have the current ones controlling the narrative.
Their job is to try and win games, not worry about the image of the game itself.
They have been a part of the problem, so they don’t deserve to be part of the solution.
No 6 - a 25m penalty because a 50m penalty is too harsh. It used to be a 15m penalty until the Sheedy coached Essendon sides of the mid 80’s started deliberately conceding 15m penalties to slow the opposition down. The 50m penalty was brought in to counter this

No 8 - Essendon (coached by Sheedy) were the first side I remember to start chipping the ball around backwards to run down the clock late in close games

No 1 - I’d be interested to see comparative stats on clearance rates of boundary throw ins v ball ups. I suspect they’re not that different
 

Wild Kelly

Club Legend
Mar 23, 2019
1,506
2,579
AFL Club
West Coast
No. 2. The flick pass was used, primarily, by players who couldn't handball with their opposite hand.

I cannot see why you would want to reintroduce it.

No. 10. Only one player should be able to tackle the ball carrier. If a second player tackles or in the case of the carrier's team mate, comes in to "hug" the group as sometimes happens, then a kick is rewarded against the "third in". If there is only one tackler then there is no excuse for the carrier not to attempt to dispose of the ball.
 
Last edited:

DickDunn

Premiership Player
Sep 8, 2011
3,947
4,326
AFL Club
West Coast
I like the boundary throw-in idea, although the time the ruckmen spend lumbering over potentially cancels out any time saved.

Getting rid of the ruck nominations and allowing the third man up is such an obvious way to speed the game up but you can bet that vandal Hocking won't want to backtrack on it
 

Cuzz09

Brownlow Medallist
Sep 21, 2004
26,466
13,256
Adel - SA - Aust - Earth
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
Norwood & Liverpool.
Could copy the SANFL and last touch the other side gets the free.

It seems to have worked well and seamlessly into their seasons.

If a ball is in dispute its a throw in still.

Only a pure disposal is a free.
 

MaxHunt

Premiership Player
Jun 2, 2006
3,916
1,905
AFL Club
West Coast
Other Teams
Charlton FC
No. 2. The flick pass was used, primarily, by players who couldn't handball with their opposite hand.

I cannot see why you would want to reintroduce it.

No. 10. Only one player should be able to tackle the ball carrier. If a second player tackles or in the case of the carrier's team mate, comes in to "hug" the group as sometimes happens, then a kick is rewarded against the "third in". If there is only one tackler then there is no excuse for the carrier not to attempt to dispose of the ball.
There's that much throwing going on these days, see dogs and tigers, I doubt it would make a huge difference
 

woosha24

Premiership Player
Apr 5, 2015
4,644
7,988
AFL Club
West Coast
No 6 - a 25m penalty because a 50m penalty is too harsh. It used to be a 15m penalty until the Sheedy coached Essendon sides of the mid 80’s started deliberately conceding 15m penalties to slow the opposition down. The 50m penalty was brought in to counter this
Yep, it would be stupid as all hell.

About to get exposed on transition? Infringe the player with the ball and knock him down. He gets to advance as far as a legally paid mark while your team gets to flood back.

Truth be told though, I have wondered if the way to beat Richmond-ball is to enforce free kicks against the Tigers. Take their run away and force long kicks up the line. Would require us to be a contested ball team, though.
 

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