mark thompsons email to david evans..

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Adelaide Hawk

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It's not really a theory, fairly certain the AFL tipped them off - IIRC Hird stated this under oath in court.

The AFL did not however hang them out to dry they carefully managed the process so the AFL tribunal cleared everyone - only because WADA appealled did the whole charade come crashing down.
Correct. The AFL and Essendon had it all worked out until WADA became involved. That is abundantly clear.
 

citizen-erased

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so much cloke and dagger
If bomber knows what evans knows, and knows it can clear up a lot of the grey areas surrounding the whole situation, why doesnt bomber just release it.

or it all exists in his head.

short of informing the players of what was given to them, i don't see what the value is in any of this.
 

Ron The Bear

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theory: AFL told essendon to banish evidence of use of supplements in order to avoid future lawsuits. then hung out essendon to dry.
Plan A: Pin it on Dank. But Dank had been injecting Hird in his office...
Plan B: Hird takes the fall. But Hirdy was having none of it.

AFL's plans in tatters. AFL fights Essendon who fight ASADA.
 

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sosos

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All these NDAs designed to protect reputations, but one wonders if there were none, could the outcomes be possibly worse?

It's hard to imagine they could so they may as well tell the public the whole story anyway.
 

blackcat

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http://www.news.com.au/sport/afl/ma...n/news-story/e040779848c5f88bced2354a23277904



theory: AFL told essendon to banish evidence of use of supplements in order to avoid future lawsuits. then hung out essendon to dry.

thoughts?
thoughts?

Evans gave a character reference to the bodybuilder who trucked in vitamins to pros like Albert, Garlick, West, Darcy

Evans gave sworn testimony to the county court

Evans knew how the game was played

<hint> not just the 80s Weagles. Tout , tous , all

See: the former Hawthorn ruckman Don Scott at a Grand Final breakfast * in 2014 with Luke Ball and Simon Madden hosted by Libbi Gorr (aka Elle Mcfeast)
words to effect 'we knew who (own team) was on the gear' (note: this is the 70's)


Note Luke Ball newly retired stays schtum

Note Simon Madden stays schtum

Not a Bob Ansett North Melbourne Grand Final Breakfast

@MaddAddam
 

blackcat

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Seems like they’ve edited out the bit about a lizard riding a giant JetSki crashing into the Pentagon during 9/11.
see: the words out of Don Scott's mouth , triangulate the epoch , work out who he means , then work out the players who partook in bodybuilder Shane Charter's vitamins regime , then when Charter was importing meth precursor drugs from Asia - see: David Evans the JB Were Goldman Sachs executive provide a character reference in the County Court with sworn testimony ;)
 

blackcat

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BINGO!

Demetriou was actually doing them a solid, and what did they do? Turned around and scapegoated Demetriou when they realised their infantile legal machinations weren't going to get them out of it. Quality people.

If Hird fell on his sword when he was told, most of the other rubbish would have been promptly handled, and essendon would have been back to business in 2014.
The Fourth Estate were gonna take this story and run with it and milk it dry as Roger Corbett's rivers of gold has started to run empty dry

The story got away from Affal House and Vlad as the succour moms[sic] like Caro came out swinging their Hermes Birkin Bags and Manolo Blahniks like the 90's video classic Jennifer Jason Leigh in Single White Female on toxic femininity

no one puts baby bridget fonda in a beaumontnational tiled bathroom corner

 
Last edited:

blackcat

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Correct. The AFL and Essendon had it all worked out until WADA became involved. That is abundantly clear.
the only one who has had the story correct is the professional female journalist who is married to Stan Grant , Tracey Holmes , everyone else missed the story , it is not an aperture on Albert and Essendon or new drugs hitting the market like peptides and lipotropin and AOD

if you dont read my stuff and cannot see the point i cant help you

the story is not football and doping, or NRL and doping

see: Werner Reiterer Postive

note: in 2000 in a club T&F meet in Sydney A Grade Aths , WR would throw his hammer-throw a distance that would have won the gold medal if it was in the Olympic Stadium at Bankstown or Picnic Point in Sydney but he was not in the Olympic team

RussellEbertHandball
1618825622774.png
 

RussellEbertHandball

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the only one who has had the story correct is the professional female journalist who is married to Stan Grant , Tracey Holmes , everyone else missed the story , it is not an aperture on Albert and Essendon or new drugs hitting the market like peptides and lipotropin and AOD

if you dont read my stuff and cannot see the point i cant help you

the story is not football and doping, or NRL and doping

see: Werner Reiterer Postive

note: in 2000 in a club T&F meet in Sydney A Grade Aths , WR would throw his hammer-throw a distance that would have won the gold medal if it was in the Olympic Stadium at Bankstown or Picnic Point in Sydney but he was not in the Olympic team

RussellEbertHandball
View attachment 1106767
Did you ever find a copy of the book? The only place you seem to be able to find it, is the National Library in Canberra these days.

Did find this 2001 article from Time magazine.


One year before the 2000 Olympics, at a small meet in Ringwood, Melbourne, Werner Reiterer-fueled by banned drugs-hurled a discus 69.69 m. Had he repeated that throw at the Games, he'd have won gold. But Reiterer did not compete in Sydney. Instead, he quit athletics, wrote a book about doping-among the most disturbing published on the subject-and dumped it in the host nation's lap just two months before the Opening Ceremony.

In Positive, Reiterer admitted to five years' abuse of performance-enhancing drugs. He explained the abuse as a last-ditch response to a sports world so awash with drugs that natural athletes-who are in the minority, just a few percent, he said, in some events-either succumb or compete without real hope of success. In this hypocritical world, the notion of "cheating" is meaningless and drug testing is ineffectual. "Sport is ugly," Reiterer wrote-and athletes, coaches and officials know it.

He adorned his story with noble sentiments, addressing his two daughters in an introduction that said, in part: "My decision to withdraw from the 2000 Olympics is so that you can see there is still a place in the world for honesty." As the launch date neared, he pondered the likely reaction. He knew the timing was sensitive and that he would upset many people, not least Olympic officials. But in time, he decided, they would accept the book as worthy: if sport is to be cleaned up, it must first be seen for what it is.

Seven months after publication, Reiterer, 33, sometimes wonders why he bothered. Though there's a flash of defiance during an interview with Time-"It's not over yet," he says, hinting at plans to make a second splash-mostly he sounds bitter and resigned, and the black shirt he wears this day seems apt. A hostile media, he argues, has sullied his reputation-beyond the self-inflicted damage. The Australian Olympic Committee, with a determination that puzzles him, is pursuing him through the courts for alleged trafficking (he has so far spent $A15,000 in legal fees). And as far as he can tell, for all the effect the book has had on the public's grasp of the realities of sport, he might as well have published his shopping list. Since he stopped using drugs early last year he's lost 18 kg, but that, he says, is a superficial change compared to others: "I used to be easy-going and take people on face value; but I don't feel I can do that anymore."

He'd hoped the world's media would be fascinated by his tale and use it as a springboard for their own investigations. The early signs were encouraging. Press releases drew hundreds of inter-view requests. Publisher Pan Macmillan checked Reiterer into a Sydney hotel, where for 72 hours he did little besides talk to journalists. "But most of them had totally missed the message," he says. "The international press were O.K., but the Australian press-all they wanted was names, and if I didn't give names, I was a liar and a cheat. Here were people who'd never competed in top-level sport, and they were questioning my credibility."

From his fellow athletes there was mostly silence, though swimming champion Kieren Perkins called the book "disgusting" and called on the Australian swimming team to bring a class action against Reiterer. Olympic swimming coach Brian Sutton said anyone who bought Positive would be "unAustralian."

Reiterer had hoped the Olympic chiefs might eventually be grateful to him. After all, he'd handed over the cheats' game plan: read it and learn. But the A.O.C. seemed more interested in damage control: it announced an inquiry into his allegations, then abandoned it before it began; and it promised him a job as an A.O.C. anti-drugs campaigner (the job hasn't eventuated). To date, fewer than 20,000 copies of the book have been sold, and no American or European publisher has picked it up.

But while most sports fans plain forgot about Reiterer, the A.O.C. went after him. The standard penalty for the drug offences Reiterer has admitted to is a lifetime ban-and he's ready to submit. But the A.O.C., based on its reading of the book, alleges that Reiterer has been involved in trafficking and is seeking unspecified "additional sanctions" through the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). For now, the case is before the Supreme Court of New South Wales-it reopens March 20-where Reiterer's lawyers are trying to stop it from reaching the CAS. Reiterer denies any involvement in trafficking.

As a book about drugs in sport, Positive had everything except names. And it's the A.O.C.'s desire to get some, according to sources, that is driving its court action. A.O.C. general secretary Craig McLatchey is guarded: "We wish to understand more, and we can do that through Werner providing evidence before CAS." But Reiterer's lawyer, Terry McCabe, says that if the A.O.C. tries to grill Reiterer for names under oath, McCabe will advise him to refuse to answer, on the ground that such inquiries would be an abuse of CAS.

A.O.C. officials maintain that the book is useless to them unless Reiterer unmasks the corrupt athletes, coaches and officials he claims abound. It's a view shared by Simon Allatson, chief executive of Athletics Australia, who adds: "Here was a chap who made an extraordinarily brave decision, who could have left a legacy for Australian sport, but wasn't prepared to go one step further." Reiterer, who's always said the purpose of the book was to expose a culture of doping in elite sport and not to destroy the reputations of individuals, responds: "In the past, athletes who've been caught using drugs have volunteered nothing. I've given them as much as I can possibly give, without ending up in jail or bankrupt [from defamation suits], and they're still trying to crucify me."

Olympic insiders suggest two other theories for the A.O.C.'s pursuit of Reiterer. The first is that he's being punished for embarrassing the Olympic movement on the eve of the Sydney Games. The second, from a source close to A.O.C. chiefs, is that the Olympic family is making an example of him "to discourage other athletes from contemplating tell-all books." McLatchey dismisses both theories.

As a confessed drug user, Austrian-born Reiterer is an unlikely candidate for sympathy. But to read Positive is to be a passenger on his journey of disillusionment. At 19, he threw the discus 2 m further than any teenager in the world ever had, and went on to become a nine-times national champion. Yet at big international meets (including the 1988 and '92 Olympics) he was consistently beaten by, to his mind, inferior athletes with inferior technique. He rejected drugs for years-even though the "athletes of the world [were] laughing at my morals and na�vety." But eventually he began a program that would include steroids, testosterone, human growth hormone and insulin. He tells how the drugs transformed him into a superathlete who might have won in Sydney had he not decided that "there was something pathetically wrong with the fact that ... an entire country would urge me on without any concept ... of the sham of which they were unwittingly a part."

Positive wasn't a complete waste of time. An independent inquiry into Reiterer's allegations against the Australian Sports Drug Agency (asda), while clearing it of wrongdoing, identified several areas for improvement. It was not asda's fault that Reiterer passed a drug test in January last year while taking eight banned substances; that he did highlights the magnitude of the task confronting the Olympic movement and all those working for clean sport. Reiterer feels he's being persecuted for telling the truth, but McLatchey is dismissive: "Why should he be considered a victim? He made some very broad statements about athletes and officials. Some of them are under a cloud as a result. It could be argued that, if they've done nothing wrong, they are the victims."

Reiterer watched bits of the Sydney Olympics on TV, enjoying them the only way he could-"by sitting back, taking in the spectacle and not looking too hard into it." He works in his family's construction firm, but the business that preoccupies him is the A.O.C.'s court action: "My wife and I lie awake at nights in disbelief at what's going on." Yet if he had his time over, he'd write the book again. Amid the confusion and anger, there's a kind of peace. He was a bigger man on drugs, but a better one, he feels, for having divulged sport's secrets. If no one's listening, well, that's their problem.
And this article from back in 2000 from the Irish Times comparing his book to Paul Kimmage's A Rough Ride

......
Positive isn't as moving or as well written as Kimmage's A Rough Ride but its story is the same and its significance is equal. Idealism hammered down over the course of a career, the realisation that virtue is what makes you the butt of everyone else's jokes.

Reiterer recalls instances of Aussie athletes of all persuasions getting their hands on gear, swapping tips about dope, instructing each other about how to dodge the testers, how to work the calendar. You could graduate in biochemistry just by absorbing enough locker-room hearsay.

Reiterer never tested positive but he reckons that on at least one occasion an Australian lab must have returned a positive test. He got the nod and the wink from officialdom.

It went like this.
He'd begun dabbling and he'd had got his maths wrong in early 1995. An Australian official sauntered up to him at the World Championships in Gothenburg and said softly that it had been noted that Reiterer had changed his training methods. Reiterer stared at him panic-stricken. The official repeated that the "change" hadn't gone unnoticed back home. Reiterer was still speechless. "but you'll be alright today though, won't you?" asked the official gravely. Then he just walked away.

Of course in Australia this week they hate Werner Reiterer not the official. They set up an inquiry so that he might name names. He announced he wouldn't name names, his complaint was about the entire system. End of story. So they threw up their hands and said "See! Let Our Happy Clean Games Begin."

The show will go on, of course. Reiterer was a discus thrower and discus throwers are never missed. Reiterer recounts a lifetime passed in the throwing circles of the grand prix circuit, watching men who had transformed themselves into livestock beating him out of the medals.

Finally he caved in. After Gothenburg he cut the Atlanta Olympics from his plans and then came back to make a deal, he says, with the Australian sports authorities. Reiterer's throwing was such that he had the potential to be Australia's only field gold medallist in Sydney. In a sports crazed land this was worth a punt. He would be given a clear run on testing through to the Olympics, in other words when he was ready to be tested he would be tested and when he wasn't ready he would be left alone.

He worked with a doctor designing the usual menu of steroids and masking agents and growth hormones. He found that by a quirk of his physiology his testosterone level seemed unable to rise above a ratio of 3:1 with his epitestosterone. The IOC limit is 6:1 and the IOC can't even test for growth hormones. Plain sailing.

And then earlier this year it all hit him in the way that it must hit lots of other athletes. He could climb on the podium, wear the medal, stand for the anthem but he'd never be a hero to himself and he'd never be able to tell the whole story to his two daughters and look them in the eye while he did it. So he quit and wrote his book instead.

Of course the Aussies hate him. He says worrying things about their heroes, he fuddles the feelings of simple nationalism which sport incites. Reiterer has made a lot of people very uncomfortable. Sections of the media have abused him in a way which Paul Kimmage would be familiar with.

The reaction of the Australian Olympic Committee of course has the usual comical touch. Told by one of their prize athletes that he has tested negative while knowing that he is positive the blazers are now rushing to make sure that Reiterer gets a two-year suspension.

The horse hasn't just bolted, it's doing the chat show circuit.

Never mind Werner, the show will go on without you. There will be times when you will look at the great show on television in September and wonder if your book ever appeared at all. No cheats. You can bet on that. And when your wee kids sitting on your lap ask how come you're not there it'll be too much to explain to them in one go, but worth it in the long haul.

Go ask Paul Kimmage.
 

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blackcat

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Did you ever find a copy of the book? The only place you seem to be able to find it, is the National Library in Canberra these days.

Did find this 2001 article from Time magazine.




And this article from back in 2000 from the Irish Times comparing his book to Paul Kimmage's A Rough Ride

......
Positive isn't as moving or as well written as Kimmage's A Rough Ride but its story is the same and its significance is equal. Idealism hammered down over the course of a career, the realisation that virtue is what makes you the butt of everyone else's jokes.

Reiterer recalls instances of Aussie athletes of all persuasions getting their hands on gear, swapping tips about dope, instructing each other about how to dodge the testers, how to work the calendar. You could graduate in biochemistry just by absorbing enough locker-room hearsay.

Reiterer never tested positive but he reckons that on at least one occasion an Australian lab must have returned a positive test. He got the nod and the wink from officialdom.

It went like this.
He'd begun dabbling and he'd had got his maths wrong in early 1995. An Australian official sauntered up to him at the World Championships in Gothenburg and said softly that it had been noted that Reiterer had changed his training methods. Reiterer stared at him panic-stricken. The official repeated that the "change" hadn't gone unnoticed back home. Reiterer was still speechless. "but you'll be alright today though, won't you?" asked the official gravely. Then he just walked away.

Of course in Australia this week they hate Werner Reiterer not the official. They set up an inquiry so that he might name names. He announced he wouldn't name names, his complaint was about the entire system. End of story. So they threw up their hands and said "See! Let Our Happy Clean Games Begin."

The show will go on, of course. Reiterer was a discus thrower and discus throwers are never missed. Reiterer recounts a lifetime passed in the throwing circles of the grand prix circuit, watching men who had transformed themselves into livestock beating him out of the medals.

Finally he caved in. After Gothenburg he cut the Atlanta Olympics from his plans and then came back to make a deal, he says, with the Australian sports authorities. Reiterer's throwing was such that he had the potential to be Australia's only field gold medallist in Sydney. In a sports crazed land this was worth a punt. He would be given a clear run on testing through to the Olympics, in other words when he was ready to be tested he would be tested and when he wasn't ready he would be left alone.

He worked with a doctor designing the usual menu of steroids and masking agents and growth hormones. He found that by a quirk of his physiology his testosterone level seemed unable to rise above a ratio of 3:1 with his epitestosterone. The IOC limit is 6:1 and the IOC can't even test for growth hormones. Plain sailing.

And then earlier this year it all hit him in the way that it must hit lots of other athletes. He could climb on the podium, wear the medal, stand for the anthem but he'd never be a hero to himself and he'd never be able to tell the whole story to his two daughters and look them in the eye while he did it. So he quit and wrote his book instead.

Of course the Aussies hate him. He says worrying things about their heroes, he fuddles the feelings of simple nationalism which sport incites. Reiterer has made a lot of people very uncomfortable. Sections of the media have abused him in a way which Paul Kimmage would be familiar with.

The reaction of the Australian Olympic Committee of course has the usual comical touch. Told by one of their prize athletes that he has tested negative while knowing that he is positive the blazers are now rushing to make sure that Reiterer gets a two-year suspension.

The horse hasn't just bolted, it's doing the chat show circuit.

Never mind Werner, the show will go on without you. There will be times when you will look at the great show on television in September and wonder if your book ever appeared at all. No cheats. You can bet on that. And when your wee kids sitting on your lap ask how come you're not there it'll be too much to explain to them in one go, but worth it in the long haul.

Go ask Paul Kimmage.
I thought you or the other Port supporter had it (Positive) , B__d man . I had BreakingTheChain prolly was ARoughRide circa 2005 , I think I bought it at Melbourne Sports Books near George Colombaris Press Club restaurant beneath The Herald building on Flinders Street(Exhibition) corner
 
Last edited:

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
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Richmond
Did you ever find a copy of the book? The only place you seem to be able to find it, is the National Library in Canberra these days.

Did find this 2001 article from Time magazine.




And this article from back in 2000 from the Irish Times comparing his book to Paul Kimmage's A Rough Ride

......
Positive isn't as moving or as well written as Kimmage's A Rough Ride but its story is the same and its significance is equal. Idealism hammered down over the course of a career, the realisation that virtue is what makes you the butt of everyone else's jokes.

Reiterer recalls instances of Aussie athletes of all persuasions getting their hands on gear, swapping tips about dope, instructing each other about how to dodge the testers, how to work the calendar. You could graduate in biochemistry just by absorbing enough locker-room hearsay.

Reiterer never tested positive but he reckons that on at least one occasion an Australian lab must have returned a positive test. He got the nod and the wink from officialdom.

It went like this.
He'd begun dabbling and he'd had got his maths wrong in early 1995. An Australian official sauntered up to him at the World Championships in Gothenburg and said softly that it had been noted that Reiterer had changed his training methods. Reiterer stared at him panic-stricken. The official repeated that the "change" hadn't gone unnoticed back home. Reiterer was still speechless. "but you'll be alright today though, won't you?" asked the official gravely. Then he just walked away.

Of course in Australia this week they hate Werner Reiterer not the official. They set up an inquiry so that he might name names. He announced he wouldn't name names, his complaint was about the entire system. End of story. So they threw up their hands and said "See! Let Our Happy Clean Games Begin."

The show will go on, of course. Reiterer was a discus thrower and discus throwers are never missed. Reiterer recounts a lifetime passed in the throwing circles of the grand prix circuit, watching men who had transformed themselves into livestock beating him out of the medals.

Finally he caved in. After Gothenburg he cut the Atlanta Olympics from his plans and then came back to make a deal, he says, with the Australian sports authorities. Reiterer's throwing was such that he had the potential to be Australia's only field gold medallist in Sydney. In a sports crazed land this was worth a punt. He would be given a clear run on testing through to the Olympics, in other words when he was ready to be tested he would be tested and when he wasn't ready he would be left alone.

He worked with a doctor designing the usual menu of steroids and masking agents and growth hormones. He found that by a quirk of his physiology his testosterone level seemed unable to rise above a ratio of 3:1 with his epitestosterone. The IOC limit is 6:1 and the IOC can't even test for growth hormones. Plain sailing.

And then earlier this year it all hit him in the way that it must hit lots of other athletes. He could climb on the podium, wear the medal, stand for the anthem but he'd never be a hero to himself and he'd never be able to tell the whole story to his two daughters and look them in the eye while he did it. So he quit and wrote his book instead.

Of course the Aussies hate him. He says worrying things about their heroes, he fuddles the feelings of simple nationalism which sport incites. Reiterer has made a lot of people very uncomfortable. Sections of the media have abused him in a way which Paul Kimmage would be familiar with.

The reaction of the Australian Olympic Committee of course has the usual comical touch. Told by one of their prize athletes that he has tested negative while knowing that he is positive the blazers are now rushing to make sure that Reiterer gets a two-year suspension.

The horse hasn't just bolted, it's doing the chat show circuit.

Never mind Werner, the show will go on without you. There will be times when you will look at the great show on television in September and wonder if your book ever appeared at all. No cheats. You can bet on that. And when your wee kids sitting on your lap ask how come you're not there it'll be too much to explain to them in one go, but worth it in the long haul.

Go ask Paul Kimmage.
I read that before and all I thought was West Coast Eagles Canadian Australian Singleton@Icebergs brouhaha sponsor Hungry JACK because Jack also owned Australian franchise rights for KFC(and BurgerKing aka HungryJacks) and the diets of Jumping Jai Turima and Ryan Bayley and Jai's final two jumps that almost took it from the Cuban ...

and then I stumbled across Reteirer
 

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
13,648
melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
Did you ever find a copy of the book? The only place you seem to be able to find it, is the National Library in Canberra these days.

Did find this 2001 article from Time magazine.




And this article from back in 2000 from the Irish Times comparing his book to Paul Kimmage's A Rough Ride

......
Positive isn't as moving or as well written as Kimmage's A Rough Ride but its story is the same and its significance is equal. Idealism hammered down over the course of a career, the realisation that virtue is what makes you the butt of everyone else's jokes.

Reiterer recalls instances of Aussie athletes of all persuasions getting their hands on gear, swapping tips about dope, instructing each other about how to dodge the testers, how to work the calendar. You could graduate in biochemistry just by absorbing enough locker-room hearsay.

Reiterer never tested positive but he reckons that on at least one occasion an Australian lab must have returned a positive test. He got the nod and the wink from officialdom.

It went like this.
He'd begun dabbling and he'd had got his maths wrong in early 1995. An Australian official sauntered up to him at the World Championships in Gothenburg and said softly that it had been noted that Reiterer had changed his training methods. Reiterer stared at him panic-stricken. The official repeated that the "change" hadn't gone unnoticed back home. Reiterer was still speechless. "but you'll be alright today though, won't you?" asked the official gravely. Then he just walked away.

Of course in Australia this week they hate Werner Reiterer not the official. They set up an inquiry so that he might name names. He announced he wouldn't name names, his complaint was about the entire system. End of story. So they threw up their hands and said "See! Let Our Happy Clean Games Begin."

The show will go on, of course. Reiterer was a discus thrower and discus throwers are never missed. Reiterer recounts a lifetime passed in the throwing circles of the grand prix circuit, watching men who had transformed themselves into livestock beating him out of the medals.

Finally he caved in. After Gothenburg he cut the Atlanta Olympics from his plans and then came back to make a deal, he says, with the Australian sports authorities. Reiterer's throwing was such that he had the potential to be Australia's only field gold medallist in Sydney. In a sports crazed land this was worth a punt. He would be given a clear run on testing through to the Olympics, in other words when he was ready to be tested he would be tested and when he wasn't ready he would be left alone.

He worked with a doctor designing the usual menu of steroids and masking agents and growth hormones. He found that by a quirk of his physiology his testosterone level seemed unable to rise above a ratio of 3:1 with his epitestosterone. The IOC limit is 6:1 and the IOC can't even test for growth hormones. Plain sailing.

And then earlier this year it all hit him in the way that it must hit lots of other athletes. He could climb on the podium, wear the medal, stand for the anthem but he'd never be a hero to himself and he'd never be able to tell the whole story to his two daughters and look them in the eye while he did it. So he quit and wrote his book instead.

Of course the Aussies hate him. He says worrying things about their heroes, he fuddles the feelings of simple nationalism which sport incites. Reiterer has made a lot of people very uncomfortable. Sections of the media have abused him in a way which Paul Kimmage would be familiar with.

The reaction of the Australian Olympic Committee of course has the usual comical touch. Told by one of their prize athletes that he has tested negative while knowing that he is positive the blazers are now rushing to make sure that Reiterer gets a two-year suspension.

The horse hasn't just bolted, it's doing the chat show circuit.

Never mind Werner, the show will go on without you. There will be times when you will look at the great show on television in September and wonder if your book ever appeared at all. No cheats. You can bet on that. And when your wee kids sitting on your lap ask how come you're not there it'll be too much to explain to them in one go, but worth it in the long haul.

Go ask Paul Kimmage.
This is what puzzles me , was Warnie mucking up too much so he was penalised for masking agent or diuretics (oneandthesame)

If you google image search Warnie + rip-off there is one picture atleast of him being in great Glen Archer shape (5'11" 200lbs) but Warnie was NEVER a good trainer or runner , loved toasted cheese sandwiches like Adelaide's Mark Cosgroveloved KFC ,, so how on earth did he get in good nick ? He became bff's with Hamill as soon as Hamill crosses from Carlton to St Kilda under coach Grant Thomas stewardship

Why did they not hide it and sweep it under the rug ? That is what I can't work out . He must have f’ed up one too many a time albeit non-publically like King and slept with the wife of the ACB chief executive or something , so they came down hard and penalised him . It definitely was NOT merely a diuretic which could have been massaged away , I spose a harbinger 10 years later of Windy Hill and James Albert Hird

Zgope1
 

sosos

Premiership Player
Apr 5, 2007
3,013
3,804
Melbourne
AFL Club
Carlton
Easy for Blackcat's favourite Soccer Mom's to say Reiterer should be the national hero, not the athletes who compete dirty.

But it's actually our simple wish as fans to be entertained by the spectacle, buy into the heroic stories, and never think too long and hard about the price the athletes, officials, and thus, society itself must pay.

Why did the book sink without trace?
What was the AOC doing suing him?
Why is the inner circle so protected, so that the only ones caught are the ones that slip outside, or who get too blatant?
I could go on and on.

Organised crime's involvement in sports betting, and sourcing the ingredients coupled with our deliberate ignorance as fans, who vote for the complicit politicians makes it a quagmire.

Needs a Royal Commission, although those things are just seen as a cost of business to the people making the big $ behind the scenes.

And at the end of the day, as long as the masses are entertained, the show will just roll on afterwards anyway.

And yeah, I'm just as bad, if not worse as I now have a slightly better understanding of what I am watching.

And I take my daughter to the footy on Saturday afternoon, and what we're actually watching is not discussed.

Tell me how you feel about Richmond's 3 in 4 blackcat?

Had the blueprint how not to do it handed to them by Essendon. Did they take it far enough inside the tent so it will never emerge?
 

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
13,648
melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
Easy for Blackcat's favourite Soccer Mom's to say Reiterer should be the national hero, not the athletes who compete dirty.

But it's actually our simple wish as fans to be entertained by the spectacle, buy into the heroic stories, and never think too long and hard about the price the athletes, officials, and thus, society itself must pay.

Why did the book sink without trace?
What was the AOC doing suing him?
Why is the inner circle so protected, so that the only ones caught are the ones that slip outside, or who get too blatant?
I could go on and on.

Organised crime's involvement in sports betting, and sourcing the ingredients coupled with our deliberate ignorance as fans, who vote for the complicit politicians makes it a quagmire.

Needs a Royal Commission, although those things are just seen as a cost of business to the people making the big $ behind the scenes.

And at the end of the day, as long as the masses are entertained, the show will just roll on afterwards anyway.

And yeah, I'm just as bad, if not worse as I now have a slightly better understanding of what I am watching.

And I take my daughter to the footy on Saturday afternoon, and what we're actually watching is not discussed.

Tell me how you feel about Richmond's 3 in 4 blackcat?

Had the blueprint how not to do it handed to them by Essendon. Did they take it far enough inside the tent so it will never emerge?
succour mom's

get it right
#[sic]

#Poe's_law
 

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
13,648
melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
succour mom's

get it right
#[sic]

#Poe's_law
re: Richmond

see that ABC Radio link to Don Scott , that is 70s . triangulate for the names . It's a pity ABC quashed the web fora ABC.net.au/bigideas (the tv video recording) to see the silent responses on the visage of Ball and Madden

plus ça change, plus c'est la même chose

ask Lance Uppercut it is for these reasons I supported Essendon with caveats

i prefer Richmond went back to 80s 90s and naughties losses


 

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
13,648
melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
sosos educate a next generation by the maxim one needs (learn) to lose before they (learn) to win

and the race of sport is akin to race of life , it begins with the self
 

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
13,648
melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
i prefer Richmond went back to 80s 90s and noughties losses
I need a clarification: wrt <enhancement> qua enhancement , Richmond is no different to all 17 other teams on PEDs . You will find one thing in common on Brownlow medal night and Brownlow tables - Dow Corning * and supps

*silicone

noughties/naughties 00

I prefer Richmond losing , i only know(knew , a past tense) of Richmond losing
i can't reconcile Richmond winning and the modern iteration of punt road
 

Aussie in exile

Club Legend
Nov 21, 2013
2,293
1,416
AFL Club
Melbourne
I would not be surprised to learn that Vlad tipped off Evans and made deals on how they were all going to handle it, which were then reneged on because the AFL’s hand in controlling the outcome wasn’t what they thought.
Lets not forget that Fat Andy has been very quiet on the whole sage ever since, and this is from a man who had a opinion on how other sports should be run. Fat Andy loved the broom,sweep,rug policy and the 3 strike rule to cover up the games drug problems
 

blackcat

antony green psephologist esqu
Dec 29, 2003
27,370
13,648
melbourne
AFL Club
Richmond
Lets not forget that Fat Andy has been very quiet on the whole sage ever since, and this is from a man who had a opinion on how other sports should be run. Fat Andy loved the broom,sweep,rug policy and the 3 strike rule to cover up the games drug problems
+ a smattering of bus-throw-undery[sic]
 

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