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As someone who was raised Catholic but is now an atheist, I say castrate the bastard and torture him. Child abuse is all too common and all too often covered up in the Catholic Church. The Church isn't responsible for perverts wanting to enter the clergy, but it is responsible for how it deals with proven pervert priests, and all too often it has put its reputation before child welfare. Pell is another predator who lacks any remorse for his crimes. A total hypocrite and fraud.
Can't say i agree with the castrate and torture part but agree with everything else you have written. The Catholic Church had a responsibility to look after the welfare of its parishioners and on this count it failed spectacularly. If there is an afterlife, then George Pell will be rotting in the place that rhymes will his surname.
 

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MUFKilda

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Can't say i agree with the castrate and torture part but agree with everything else you have written. The Catholic Church had a responsibility to look after the welfare of its parishioners and on this count it failed spectacularly. If there is an afterlife, then George Pell will be rotting in the place that rhymes will his surname.
Hyperbole on my part, but, then again, maybe not....to destroy the lives of children is terrible; to then spend decades moralising to others about goodness is the behaviour of a psychopath. Men like him are the lowest form of life, yet he demanded status and respect, in spite of his perversity. it takes a special kind of miscreant to do that. His victims will be scarred for life.
 
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Hyperbole on my part, but, then again, maybe not....to destroy the lives of children is terrible; to then spend decades moralising to others about goodness is the behaviour of a psychopath. Men like him are the lowest form of life, yet he demanded status and respect, in spite of his perversity. it takes a special kind of miscreant to do that. His victims will be scarred for life.
I don't think there is hyperbole in your post, MUFKilda. It is something so terrible, the averae person who has not had to endure it, even vicariously through a loved one or relative, cannot possibly comprehend it. Torture of prisoners is unconscionable. Except in the case of child rapists. I speak from extensive, bitter professional experience. Lives are destroyed. The damage is unimaginable. Survivors live in hell every day because of the attacks. The offence that keeps recurring.

If we are serious about protecting children and providing a safe society in which they can develop into fully formed, happy, productive adults then the one thing we can do is permanently incarcerate and isolate the monsters who perpetrate these crimes. The "Village of the Damned" facility at Ararat would be a perfect place to house them all. They are incorrigible. There is no cure. As much as I hate to admit it, because I'm anti-death penalty, in this case, we should make an exception. They are vermin we need to rid ourselves of. The harm they cause is immeasurable, physically, psychologically and financially.

Of course, all paedophiles are made and not born. The perpetrators are highly likely to have been victims themselves, with their offending being their way of "normalising" and justifying their perversion. Of course, not all survivors perpetuate paedophilia. Many go the opposite way and do everything in their power to ensure it doesn't happen to others and become zealots for the cause. That is their way of normalising their experience and one that offers hope for recovery and effective self-adjustment. Those who harbour, enable and support creatures like Pell and his cohort of offending priests, should be charged with being accessories to the crimes. If the consequences are appropriate, enforced and there is a high risk of being caught, you'd soon make inroads into solving the problem.
 

VDS66

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I don't think there is hyperbole in your post, MUFKilda. It is something so terrible, the averae person who has not had to endure it, even vicariously through a loved one or relative, cannot possibly comprehend it. Torture of prisoners is unconscionable. Except in the case of child rapists. I speak from extensive, bitter professional experience. Lives are destroyed. The damage is unimaginable. Survivors live in hell every day because of the attacks. The offence that keeps recurring.

If we are serious about protecting children and providing a safe society in which they can develop into fully formed, happy, productive adults then the one thing we can do is permanently incarcerate and isolate the monsters who perpetrate these crimes. The "Village of the Damned" facility at Ararat would be a perfect place to house them all. They are incorrigible. There is no cure. As much as I hate to admit it, because I'm anti-death penalty, in this case, we should make an exception. They are vermin we need to rid ourselves of. The harm they cause is immeasurable, physically, psychologically and financially.

Of course, all paedophiles are made and not born. The perpetrators are highly likely to have been victims themselves, with their offending being their way of "normalising" and justifying their perversion. Of course, not all survivors perpetuate paedophilia. Many go the opposite way and do everything in their power to ensure it doesn't happen to others and become zealots for the cause. That is their way of normalising their experience and one that offers hope for recovery and effective self-adjustment. Those who harbour, enable and support creatures like Pell and his cohort of offending priests, should be charged with being accessories to the crimes. If the consequences are appropriate, enforced and there is a high risk of being caught, you'd soon make inroads into solving the problem.
I agree with the accessories part.

Great idea. You cover it up, you're just as guilty.

Soon put a stop to it IMO.

The church itself needs to go further as well.

The sooner they allow female priests and marriage, the better.

Unfortunately, much like the right wing of the lnp, the right wing of the Vatican won't allow it.
 

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I don't think there is hyperbole in your post, MUFKilda. It is something so terrible, the averae person who has not had to endure it, even vicariously through a loved one or relative, cannot possibly comprehend it. Torture of prisoners is unconscionable. Except in the case of child rapists. I speak from extensive, bitter professional experience. Lives are destroyed. The damage is unimaginable. Survivors live in hell every day because of the attacks. The offence that keeps recurring.

If we are serious about protecting children and providing a safe society in which they can develop into fully formed, happy, productive adults then the one thing we can do is permanently incarcerate and isolate the monsters who perpetrate these crimes. The "Village of the Damned" facility at Ararat would be a perfect place to house them all. They are incorrigible. There is no cure. As much as I hate to admit it, because I'm anti-death penalty, in this case, we should make an exception. They are vermin we need to rid ourselves of. The harm they cause is immeasurable, physically, psychologically and financially.

Of course, all paedophiles are made and not born. The perpetrators are highly likely to have been victims themselves, with their offending being their way of "normalising" and justifying their perversion. Of course, not all survivors perpetuate paedophilia. Many go the opposite way and do everything in their power to ensure it doesn't happen to others and become zealots for the cause. That is their way of normalising their experience and one that offers hope for recovery and effective self-adjustment. Those who harbour, enable and support creatures like Pell and his cohort of offending priests, should be charged with being accessories to the crimes. If the consequences are appropriate, enforced and there is a high risk of being caught, you'd soon make inroads into solving the problem.
I have to agree, mate. I consider myself socially liberal, and, like yourself, I oppose the death penalty; yet there are a few things I find unforgivable, amongst which is child molestation. For a person in a position of authority and social respect to misuse that position to take gratuitous advantage of the most vulnerable - children - is to sink to the lowest depths of humanity; and to do so whilst claiming to be a man of God is beyond anything. How dare he preach to others.
 

VDS66

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I have to agree, mate. I consider myself socially liberal, and, like yourself, I oppose the death penalty; yet there are a few things I find unforgivable, amongst which is child molestation. For a person in a position of authority and social respect to misuse that position to take gratuitous advantage of the most vulnerable - children - is to sink to the lowest depths of humanity; and to do so whilst claiming to be a man of God is beyond anything. How dare he preach to others.
There is an inherent problem with the death penalty.

Firstly it isn't a deterrent.

Secondly the risk of wrong conviction.

Especially with these sorts of crimes, it's fair to say there's no chance of a fair trial in most cases.

People want justice, even if it is the wrong person.

My thoughts are that a mandatory life sentence where life actually means life is about right.

Thenet them loose inside and let natural justice run its course...😉😈
 

MUFKilda

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There is an inherent problem with the death penalty.

Firstly it isn't a deterrent.

Secondly the risk of wrong conviction.

Especially with these sorts of crimes, it's fair to say there's no chance of a fair trial in most cases.

People want justice, even if it is the wrong person.

My thoughts are that a mandatory life sentence where life actually means life is about right.

Thenet them loose inside and let natural justice run its course...😉😈

I fully agree. I oppose the death penalty for several reasons, including miscarriages of justices and, what seems to me, a fallacious argument about its being a deterrent. Yet there is a visceral rage many of us feel against the likes of child molesters/murderers, which isn't to say I would want the likes of Pell executed. There is no easy answer, but I'm prepared to accept life behind bars for offenders, though I feel somewhat hypocritical, as, if the victim was a child in my family, I would gladly kill the offender myself and take the consequences. On the other hand, I suppose we must accept that the law shouldn't be applied as if we were personally involved and at our angriest. We must want justice to be applied equally, even for the worst amongst us.
 
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r? Many times in my police career, I charged people who deliberately provided false information in murder and rape offences
I agree with the accessories part.

Great idea. You cover it up, you're just as guilty.

Soon put a stop to it IMO.

The church itself needs to go further as well.

The sooner they allow female priests and marriage, the better.

Unfortunately, much like the right wing of the lnp, the right wing of the Vatican won't allow it.
Celibacy is an issue, but not the factor most think it is, VDS. I've done extensive research on this. Interesting to compare Buddhist monks, Islamic Imams, Rabbis and various, non-Catholic denominations of Christianity. Whilst sexual abuse is present in all of these groups, as aberrant sexual behaviour is part of the general human condition, in Catholicism, it is far greater in magnitude and severity of the offences. The major problem causing widespread abuse in the Catholic Church is that not only is paedophilia routinely committed, but it is also tolerated and perpetrators are protected from prosecution in a misguided attempt to protect the church's public image.

Therefore, we have a perfect storm for encouraging, committing and perpetuating the behaviour. It is an insidious form of corruption. The best antidote to corruption? Increase the risk of detection. Make the consequences severe. Enforce those consequences, fearlessly and without favour. I saw it in various pockets of the Police Force. Where corruption is tolerated and encouraged from within, it flourishes. There's a reason the Drug, Armed Robbery and Major Crime Squads in their previous iterations no longer exist. Cannibalised from within by their own corrupt behaviours. Cries of "noble cause" corruption were merely inappropriate distractions to justify illegal and criminal behaviour, driven by frustration and greed. As for the LNP, yes, they have plenty to hide and as part of the conservative, controlling establishment, they are part of the problem.

Let's not forget, though, there are former sitting members of the Labor Party currently charged with, or serving time for sex offences (I believe the number is five). Not to mention the continued stench over the Shorten rape allegations that simply won't go away. Before anyone jumps to his defence, there have been a number of allegations along these lines made against him in the distant past that indicate he has a certain MO when it comes to women who can resist his sexual charms. Don't get me started on the shocking allegations levelled against the Whitlam government and Bob Hawke personally. If they were around in today's "#me too" environment and the age of social media, they would've been in more trouble than the early explorers, but I digress.

Where Pell is most guilty, is not just in perpetrating assaults, but enabling others to continue their predation by protecting them from detection and prosecution. Why should protecting and assisting paedophiles be in a different category to any other offence, purely because you belong to a certain cult?

If I harboured a known rapist in my home and the police came knocking, should, and would I not, be prosecuted for providing the police with misleading information and assisting him in avoiding prosecution? Many times in my police career I charged people who deliberately gave false information to derail investigations. Many were also charged with being accessories. It is a simple concept and a relatively straightforward charge to prove. Then there is the aspect of conspiracy to, and actually, perverting the course of justice. There are plenty of options available to tackle the problem, from a legal and enforcement perspective, anyway.

The institutional corruption in the Catholic Church is so ingrained in its belief and organisational systems, that many of the participants claim there is no problem. The organistion is so corrupt, it's members don't even know or acknowledge how corrupt it is. In my work, if I suspect on reasonable grounds that a person is a danger to themselves or others, I'm duty bound to break the contract of confidentiality with the client. The same applies to the reporting of suspected abuse for teachers, social workers, health care professionals etc. If it applies to all of us who are responsible for the psychological and physical welfare of those in our care, how can it not apply who are entrusted with our spiritual health?

The Catholic Church has created a self-serving suite of beliefs and rules that are designed only to protect itself and its staff. The most bizarre of these is the confessional. The second is that priests are intermediaries between the individual and God. A direct hotline to the Creator. The last of these is celibacy. All ridiculous concepts that elevate priests to an unwarranted status and allow them to control their followers through demands for obedience and fear of consequences. How ironic is it that they can't apply these rules of consequences for aberrant behaviour to regulate their own?

If celibacy was the complete answer we would not see sexual abuse in any of the religions that do not demand it of their clerics. It must be conceded that eliminating celibacy would help ease some of the problems. Far from moving you closer to God, as those participating faiths believe, I assert it actually moves you further away from any Creator who may exist.

That's an argument for another time (Buddhist myself, so we don't have an individual God. Only the Universe and ourselves). Sex and the drive to procreate are visceral human instincts, critical functions in our "machine" to ensure the survival and perpetuation of the species. To deny any person the opportunity to act on these drives is tantamount to torture. It is in the same category as solitary confinement. We are social creatures and isolation prematurely ages us and leads to chronic illnesses and death. Celibacy also moves the individual further from his or her community in that it reduces empathy with those who have experienced the joy, trials and tribulations of raising children and families. The Catholic model for the priesthood is as unnatural as it is bizarre. Given the circumstances, it is little wonder these problems exist and always have.
 
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I have to agree, mate. I consider myself socially liberal, and, like yourself, I oppose the death penalty; yet there are a few things I find unforgivable, amongst which is child molestation. For a person in a position of authority and social respect to misuse that position to take gratuitous advantage of the most vulnerable - children - is to sink to the lowest depths of humanity; and to do so whilst claiming to be a man of God is beyond anything. How dare he preach to others.
Not trying to be lenient but i believe in degree's of punishment.
If it was death penalty for molesting a kid, the sicko, once his urges are over, would want it to go away. Not much to lose if they face the death penalty.
Its really bad if a kid is molested, but you don't want to encourage them to be killed at the same time. At least there's a chance of healing the damage of the former.
 

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MUFKilda

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Not trying to be lenient but i believe in degree's of punishment.
If it was death penalty for molesting a kid, the sicko, once his urges are over, would want it to go away. Not much to lose if they face the death penalty.
Its really bad if a kid is molested, but you don't want to encourage them to be killed at the same time. At least there's a chance of healing the damage of the former.
I agree, I can't support capital punishment under any circumstances, yet, as I said previously, I will willingly admit my own hypocrisy, as I would kill anyone who did such thing to a child in my family. However, that would be no basis for making the law; I'm fully aware of that. The law must be cool headed and appreciate every aspect.
 

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r? Many times in my police career, I charged people who deliberately provided false information in murder and rape offences

Celibacy is an issue, but not the factor most think it is, VDS. I've done extensive research on this. Interesting to compare Buddhist monks, Islamic Imams, Rabbis and various, non-Catholic denominations of Christianity. Whilst sexual abuse is present in all of these groups, as aberrant sexual behaviour is part of the general human condition, in Catholicism, it is far greater in magnitude and severity of the offences. The major problem causing widespread abuse in the Catholic Church is that not only is paedophilia routinely committed, but it is also tolerated and perpetrators are protected from prosecution in a misguided attempt to protect the church's public image.

Therefore, we have a perfect storm for encouraging, committing and perpetuating the behaviour. It is an insidious form of corruption. The best antidote to corruption? Increase the risk of detection. Make the consequences severe. Enforce those consequences, fearlessly and without favour. I saw it in various pockets of the Police Force. Where corruption is tolerated and encouraged from within, it flourishes. There's a reason the Drug, Armed Robbery and Major Crime Squads in their previous iterations no longer exist. Cannibalised from within by their own corrupt behaviours. Cries of "noble cause" corruption were merely inappropriate distractions to justify illegal and criminal behaviour, driven by frustration and greed. As for the LNP, yes, they have plenty to hide and as part of the conservative, controlling establishment, they are part of the problem.

Let's not forget, though, there are former sitting members of the Labor Party currently charged with, or serving time for sex offences (I believe the number is five). Not to mention the continued stench over the Shorten rape allegations that simply won't go away. Before anyone jumps to his defence, there have been a number of allegations along these lines made against him in the distant past that indicate he has a certain MO when it comes to women who can resist his sexual charms. Don't get me started on the shocking allegations levelled against the Whitlam government and Bob Hawke personally. If they were around in today's "#me too" environment and the age of social media, they would've been in more trouble than the early explorers, but I digress.

Where Pell is most guilty, is not just in perpetrating assaults, but enabling others to continue their predation by protecting them from detection and prosecution. Why should protecting and assisting paedophiles be in a different category to any other offence, purely because you belong to a certain cult?

If I harboured a known rapist in my home and the police came knocking, should, and would I not, be prosecuted for providing the police with misleading information and assisting him in avoiding prosecution? Many times in my police career I charged people who deliberately gave false information to derail investigations. Many were also charged with being accessories. It is a simple concept and a relatively straightforward charge to prove. Then there is the aspect of conspiracy to, and actually, perverting the course of justice. There are plenty of options available to tackle the problem, from a legal and enforcement perspective, anyway.

The institutional corruption in the Catholic Church is so ingrained in its belief and organisational systems, that many of the participants claim there is no problem. The organistion is so corrupt, it's members don't even know or acknowledge how corrupt it is. In my work, if I suspect on reasonable grounds that a person is a danger to themselves or others, I'm duty bound to break the contract of confidentiality with the client. The same applies to the reporting of suspected abuse for teachers, social workers, health care professionals etc. If it applies to all of us who are responsible for the psychological and physical welfare of those in our care, how can it not apply who are entrusted with our spiritual health?

The Catholic Church has created a self-serving suite of beliefs and rules that are designed only to protect itself and its staff. The most bizarre of these is the confessional. The second is that priests are intermediaries between the individual and God. A direct hotline to the Creator. The last of these is celibacy. All ridiculous concepts that elevate priests to an unwarranted status and allow them to control their followers through demands for obedience and fear of consequences. How ironic is it that they can't apply these rules of consequences for aberrant behaviour to regulate their own?

If celibacy was the complete answer we would not see sexual abuse in any of the religions that do not demand it of their clerics. It must be conceded that eliminating celibacy would help ease some of the problems. Far from moving you closer to God, as those participating faiths believe, I assert it actually moves you further away from any Creator who may exist.

That's an argument for another time (Buddhist myself, so we don't have an individual God. Only the Universe and ourselves). Sex and the drive to procreate are visceral human instincts, critical functions in our "machine" to ensure the survival and perpetuation of the species. To deny any person the opportunity to act on these drives is tantamount to torture. It is in the same category as solitary confinement. We are social creatures and isolation prematurely ages us and leads to chronic illnesses and death. Celibacy also moves the individual further from his or her community in that it reduces empathy with those who have experienced the joy, trials and tribulations of raising children and families. The Catholic model for the priesthood is as unnatural as it is bizarre. Given the circumstances, it is little wonder these problems exist and always have.
Outstanding post, thanks Drake.
 

VDS66

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r? Many times in my police career, I charged people who deliberately provided false information in murder and rape offences

Celibacy is an issue, but not the factor most think it is, VDS. I've done extensive research on this. Interesting to compare Buddhist monks, Islamic Imams, Rabbis and various, non-Catholic denominations of Christianity. Whilst sexual abuse is present in all of these groups, as aberrant sexual behaviour is part of the general human condition, in Catholicism, it is far greater in magnitude and severity of the offences. The major problem causing widespread abuse in the Catholic Church is that not only is paedophilia routinely committed, but it is also tolerated and perpetrators are protected from prosecution in a misguided attempt to protect the church's public image.

Therefore, we have a perfect storm for encouraging, committing and perpetuating the behaviour. It is an insidious form of corruption. The best antidote to corruption? Increase the risk of detection. Make the consequences severe. Enforce those consequences, fearlessly and without favour. I saw it in various pockets of the Police Force. Where corruption is tolerated and encouraged from within, it flourishes. There's a reason the Drug, Armed Robbery and Major Crime Squads in their previous iterations no longer exist. Cannibalised from within by their own corrupt behaviours. Cries of "noble cause" corruption were merely inappropriate distractions to justify illegal and criminal behaviour, driven by frustration and greed. As for the LNP, yes, they have plenty to hide and as part of the conservative, controlling establishment, they are part of the problem.

Let's not forget, though, there are former sitting members of the Labor Party currently charged with, or serving time for sex offences (I believe the number is five). Not to mention the continued stench over the Shorten rape allegations that simply won't go away. Before anyone jumps to his defence, there have been a number of allegations along these lines made against him in the distant past that indicate he has a certain MO when it comes to women who can resist his sexual charms. Don't get me started on the shocking allegations levelled against the Whitlam government and Bob Hawke personally. If they were around in today's "#me too" environment and the age of social media, they would've been in more trouble than the early explorers, but I digress.

Where Pell is most guilty, is not just in perpetrating assaults, but enabling others to continue their predation by protecting them from detection and prosecution. Why should protecting and assisting paedophiles be in a different category to any other offence, purely because you belong to a certain cult?

If I harboured a known rapist in my home and the police came knocking, should, and would I not, be prosecuted for providing the police with misleading information and assisting him in avoiding prosecution? Many times in my police career I charged people who deliberately gave false information to derail investigations. Many were also charged with being accessories. It is a simple concept and a relatively straightforward charge to prove. Then there is the aspect of conspiracy to, and actually, perverting the course of justice. There are plenty of options available to tackle the problem, from a legal and enforcement perspective, anyway.

The institutional corruption in the Catholic Church is so ingrained in its belief and organisational systems, that many of the participants claim there is no problem. The organistion is so corrupt, it's members don't even know or acknowledge how corrupt it is. In my work, if I suspect on reasonable grounds that a person is a danger to themselves or others, I'm duty bound to break the contract of confidentiality with the client. The same applies to the reporting of suspected abuse for teachers, social workers, health care professionals etc. If it applies to all of us who are responsible for the psychological and physical welfare of those in our care, how can it not apply who are entrusted with our spiritual health?

The Catholic Church has created a self-serving suite of beliefs and rules that are designed only to protect itself and its staff. The most bizarre of these is the confessional. The second is that priests are intermediaries between the individual and God. A direct hotline to the Creator. The last of these is celibacy. All ridiculous concepts that elevate priests to an unwarranted status and allow them to control their followers through demands for obedience and fear of consequences. How ironic is it that they can't apply these rules of consequences for aberrant behaviour to regulate their own?

If celibacy was the complete answer we would not see sexual abuse in any of the religions that do not demand it of their clerics. It must be conceded that eliminating celibacy would help ease some of the problems. Far from moving you closer to God, as those participating faiths believe, I assert it actually moves you further away from any Creator who may exist.

That's an argument for another time (Buddhist myself, so we don't have an individual God. Only the Universe and ourselves). Sex and the drive to procreate are visceral human instincts, critical functions in our "machine" to ensure the survival and perpetuation of the species. To deny any person the opportunity to act on these drives is tantamount to torture. It is in the same category as solitary confinement. We are social creatures and isolation prematurely ages us and leads to chronic illnesses and death. Celibacy also moves the individual further from his or her community in that it reduces empathy with those who have experienced the joy, trials and tribulations of raising children and families. The Catholic model for the priesthood is as unnatural as it is bizarre. Given the circumstances, it is little wonder these problems exist and always have.
Good points..

I read an article last week about a gay orthodox man. He mention that they allow marriage, but there are still married priests who are gay and living a lie. So they you go.

He did charity work and dealt with priests from all denominations.

His salient point was this: when working with priests, the one thing I noticed was their sleeping quarters. A small room, single bed and a dresser. Just like a little boys room.

His premise was that basically, Priests never grow up the same way that we do as adults. They are immune from reality and live in a bubble.
 

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I don't know what it's like in Australia, but here in the big cities in Britain the Catholic tradition is very much from the austere Irish tradition, where conformity and obedience is enforced. I suppose the contradiction between that and the opposing tradition of British urban socialism forced us all to choose sides, and I rejected religion, in favour of politics, whilst still at school, where I had to attend Mass every day. I still regard the Catholic Church as a hypocritical abomination, based upon shaming people from birth, and, to me, that isn't the Christian message. I have a problem with organised religion in all forms, and the abuse cases merely reinforce that.
 
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gringo2011

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Good points..

I read an article last week about a gay orthodox man. He mention that they allow marriage, but there are still married priests who are gay and living a lie. So they you go.

He did charity work and dealt with priests from all denominations.

His salient point was this: when working with priests, the one thing I noticed was their sleeping quarters. A small room, single bed and a dresser. Just like a little boys room.

His premise was that basically, Priests never grow up the same way that we do as adults. They are immune from reality and live in a bubble.

My wife's uncle is a priest overseas. He came out here with another priest to stay with her folks, his mate was from Brazil and the most high camp queen you could imagine. I'm 100% sure they are in a gay relationship, father Fernando was awesome, he's telling us how her uncle can't apply coconut oil on his back properly and was showing us photos of himself lounging in a pair of micro bathers drinking Pina coladas with umbrellas. You couldn't find a more stereo typical South American queen anywhere. He's like a flamboyant flamingo on acid. My wife gets shitty when I suggest her uncle might be gay but I'd rather him be a queen than a child molester. At least if they are doing it with each other they are less likely to be doing it to kids.
 

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I agree with the accessories part.

Great idea. You cover it up, you're just as guilty.

Soon put a stop to it IMO.

The church itself needs to go further as well.

The sooner they allow female priests and marriage, the better.

Unfortunately, much like the right wing of the lnp, the right wing of the Vatican won't allow it.
I can't talk about the Catholic Church but the synod of the clergy of the CofE has long voted for female priests, only for the synod of the laity to vote it down in both England and Aus, it should be noted that church councils and synods are dominated by women who don't wanr female priests.
 

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My wife's uncle is a priest overseas. He came out here with another priest to stay with her folks, his mate was from Brazil and the most high camp queen you could imagine. I'm 100% sure they are in a gay relationship, father Fernando was awesome, he's telling us how her uncle can't apply coconut oil on his back properly and was showing us photos of himself lounging in a pair of micro bathers drinking Pina coladas with umbrellas. You couldn't find a more stereo typical South American queen anywhere. He's like a flamboyant flamingo on acid. My wife gets shitty when I suggest her uncle might be gay but I'd rather him be a queen than a child molester. At least if they are doing it with each other they are less likely to be doing it to kids.
A flamboyant flamingo on acid! lol

Sounds like a mix between Eric Estrada and Ricky Martin! That's one groovy Chip! :cool:
 

MUFKilda

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My wife's uncle is a priest overseas. He came out here with another priest to stay with her folks, his mate was from Brazil and the most high camp queen you could imagine. I'm 100% sure they are in a gay relationship, father Fernando was awesome, he's telling us how her uncle can't apply coconut oil on his back properly and was showing us photos of himself lounging in a pair of micro bathers drinking Pina coladas with umbrellas. You couldn't find a more stereo typical South American queen anywhere. He's like a flamboyant flamingo on acid. My wife gets shitty when I suggest her uncle might be gay but I'd rather him be a queen than a child molester. At least if they are doing it with each other they are less likely to be doing it to kids.
And what consenting adults do is their business. Far better gay priests than hypocritical paedophiles, but that's organised religion!
 

MUFKilda

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I can't talk about the Catholic Church but the synod of the clergy of the CofE has long voted for female priests, only for the synod of the laity to vote it down in both England and Aus, it should be noted that church councils and synods are dominated by women who don't wanr female priests.
We have female Anglican priests here. Aren't they in Australia?
 
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There is an inherent problem with the death penalty.

Firstly it isn't a deterrent.

Secondly the risk of wrong conviction.

Especially with these sorts of crimes, it's fair to say there's no chance of a fair trial in most cases.

People want justice, even if it is the wrong person.

My thoughts are that a mandatory life sentence where life actually means life is about right.

Thenet them loose inside and let natural justice run its course...😉😈
The only positive effect of the death penalty is that it eliminates recidivism. If it was an effective deterrent there would be very few murders where states have it. This is because no one ever commits that sort of crime thinking they'll be caught. Throw in the fact that the most serious crimes usually have elements of loss of emotional control and effective cognitive processes and you can see why it isn't effective in that regard.
 

mightymalaka

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The only positive effect of the death penalty is that it eliminates recidivism. If it was an effective deterrent there would be very few murders where states have it. This is because no one ever commits that sort of crime thinking they'll be caught. Throw in the fact that the most serious crimes usually have elements of loss of emotional control and effective cognitive processes and you can see why it isn't effective in that regard.
What astounds me is the ridiculously exorbitant cost in putting someone to death in the US apparently!
Heard a Senator once debating the merits of capital punishment in that he was heavily against it claiming that it costs more
To actually do that as opposed to spending a lifetime rotting away in jail! By a significant amount too!

Seeing that the US and the western world in general values the dollar more than life itself i was left surprised that any states still do it!
 

Mowman

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Hyperbole on my part, but, then again, maybe not....to destroy the lives of children is terrible; to then spend decades moralising to others about goodness is the behaviour of a psychopath. Men like him are the lowest form of life, yet he demanded status and respect, in spite of his perversity. it takes a special kind of miscreant to do that. His victims will be scarred for life.
You're on the money mate
Like you said his victims are scarred for life
 

Moral Decay

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We have female Anglican priests here. Aren't they in Australia?
Sorry you're right
Been a long time since I went to church The Anglican Church certainly has female priests, though individual parishes have the right to reject them. There are even some female bishops. My memories remain of the arguments and the struggle. How many female clergy there are and the influence that anyone has is pretty opaque.
 
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