Discussion Mental Illness (Call Beyond Blue (1300 224 636), Lifeline (131 114))

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Thread starter #1
I'm not sure if there a thread for this in our board, but I just want everyone to know regardless of your circumstances or problems, suicidal isn't the solution for it. Yes, it may seem like the right choice but its really, your loss will drastically change at least one person's life, and it could be someone you wouldn't even expect it to be. If someone isn't ok, check on them, if someone needs help, give your best shot. Be there for everyone you love and care, because in the world we live in, things are hidden so easily and it's only matter of seconds before we lose them.

Now, this Illness is genuinely becoming a issue in the AFL industry, as we all know the events of the last few days, its truly devastating and whatever the reasoning it is, I hope its resolved. I just want everyone to not get into our players face, when I say our as in every player in the league, because we don't know what's going through their lifes, and us being maniacs because they ain't performing well enough or the fact they play for a rival team is pretty dumb. If you see them around, have a chat, ask them how they doing and try to put a smile on their face, this industry truly needs genuine care and love because some fans just bring too much animosity.

We all might have experienced some sort of mental Illness, I have and it changed me a lot. And I hope this thread doesnt provoke anyone, it's just I want the community to know, that they are loved and needed.

Now, have a wonderful Christmas, New Year and best of luck for 2019. Go SAINTS!
 

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ScrappyDo

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#3
Something to be mindful of is just how isolating it is having a condition. From experience, acquiring a suicidal condition does not require the person to be mentally ill to begin with, but by definition "is" a mental illness, because your mind has slipped outside of "normal" logical functionality. You find yourself at the bottom of a deep well, with water up to your nose, and no idea how you got there. The embarrassment is overwhelming, and your logic tells you that you must be an idiot for letting it happen. Asking for help is agonizing and becomes almost impossible, and when the thought of enduring the next day becomes more frightening than the thought of ending your life, well that's when letting go of your life becomes the best available option. You can't expect people in this state to ask for help, because its contradictory to the condition.
So if you are worried about someone in your life, don't be afraid to stick your nose in, and don't accept "I'm fine" as an answer. Take the time to let the person open up about their problems, and be aware that they may not be thinking straight despite outside appearance. Be gentle and sensitive, but be aware that there is a shell of pretense and defensiveness that needs to be cracked before you get to the real deal. Don't be afraid to help someone peeps. Its never not worth it..
 

Keg on legs

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#6
I feel it’s an appropriate time to give this a bump.

Seek help, talk to someone. Try to stop obsessing over negative thoughts and learn to be grateful for the present.

Look out for each guys. Go Saints.
Can never be bumped enough.

It's such an important message that we all need to take care of ourselves and each other. There's no shame or weakness in seeking help in times of need.
 

CaptainRisky

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#8
I had a first hand scare of this illness yesterday, a friend sent me a link to the Victoria police Facebook page only to see that a friend of mine had gone missing and the police were looking for him . I left a message on his facebook page yesterday and he called me today, to say i was relived is an understatement , Here is a guy in his early 30's good looking roster , great personality yet is constantly fighting demons in his head . No one is immune to this shitty illness.
I had a good chat with him and hopefully he takes my advise and in the mean time he is going to spend some time up on the Murray River fishing to try and clear his head.
Ps , has anyone heard how Majak is doing ?
 

st_trav_ofWA

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#9
some times all it takes is a simple "how you going" to someone to make the world of differance ...
its sadly something i have experianced first hand with my cousin taking her life as a 20 year old in the 90's and them my uncle taking his life 4 years ago ...
in the case of my cousin i was too young to really grasp the enormity of the situation and to be fair the whole situation was swept under the carpet by the family and never spoken about (in fact posting it here right now is the first time Ive every really spoke about it)..
for my Uncle i didnt handle it well to be honest and had to lean on my family and friends to sort of get my head together over it , growing up i was relly close with him but as things happen over time we had a falling out over a trivial matter so at the time of his passing we were not on talking terms so when it did happen it effected me terribly ... im ok now but i do find myself being very pasionate about talking through problems ... a wise man once said a problem shared is a problem halved so i cant strees this more to anyone and everyone reach out to someone anyone if you are struggling its not weak its not annoying or being needy its about sharing the load ....
 

CALL ME SNAKE

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#10
things always get better. just need to wait it out
This of course is a simplified view .
At times it can obviously be extremely hard to make the person see that there is indeed light at the end of the tunnel. But YES 99% of the time there is indeed light if you can make it through the darkness .
I wont go into all the personal details for their privacy but a family member of mine attempted suicide a few yrs back due to a relationship break up. This was no cry for help it a genuine attempt to end it all .
It was an absolute miracle that the body was discovered before it was too late. Another 30 minutes or so and there wouldve been no chance of revival.
Anyway fast fwd a few yrs later and now they are happy , Married with a beautiful child and another on the way .
Just thinking about their child and the new bub on the way puts a lump in my throat. We are so lucky to have them as part of our extended family.
Nowdays every time i hear of a "successful" suicide attempt i feel sick in my stomach.
 

st_trav_ofWA

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#11
This of course is a simplified view .
At times it can obviously be extremely hard to make the person see that there is indeed light at the end of the tunnel. But YES 99% of the time there is indeed light if you can make it through the darkness .
I wont go into all the personal details for their privacy but a family member of mine attempted suicide a few yrs back due to a relationship break up. This was no cry for help it a genuine attempt to end it all .
It was an absolute miracle that the body was discovered before it was too late. Another 30 minutes or so and there wouldve been no chance of revival.
Anyway fast fwd a few yrs later and now they are happy , Married with a beautiful child and another on the way .
Just thinking about their child and the new bub on the way puts a lump in my throat. We are so lucky to have them as part of our extended family.
Nowdays every time i hear of a "successful" suicide attempt i feel sick in my stomach.
i think the thing of it is as humans we are strange creatures for as much as we are all very much alike and have the same make up to make us human we all are very much differant to eachother and the battles somepeople face can to an outsider seem very minor but to others can be everything ... we all have differant triggers that can turn things on their head there is no standard plan on how we live in our own minds , we look at some of the most successful people in the world who have it all but are cut down by their own thoughts and feelings and on the other hand you have the poorest of the poor with a life of dispare who just keep on keeping on ... you can never know the battles a person is fighting on a day to day basis but i think with a bit of kindness a bit of understanding and compassion we all have the ability in us to make a positive change for someone every day ..
thats my real worry about the world , as we become more protected with our privacy and less trusting of our fellow man we tend to push ourselfs to fight our internal battle more alone
 

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Brains Trust66

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#12
Something to be mindful of is just how isolating it is having a condition. From experience, acquiring a suicidal condition does not require the person to be mentally ill to begin with, but by definition "is" a mental illness, because your mind has slipped outside of "normal" logical functionality. You find yourself at the bottom of a deep well, with water up to your nose, and no idea how you got there. The embarrassment is overwhelming, and your logic tells you that you must be an idiot for letting it happen. Asking for help is agonizing and becomes almost impossible, and when the thought of enduring the next day becomes more frightening than the thought of ending your life, well that's when letting go of your life becomes the best available option. You can't expect people in this state to ask for help, because its contradictory to the condition.
So if you are worried about someone in your life, don't be afraid to stick your nose in, and don't accept "I'm fine" as an answer. Take the time to let the person open up about their problems, and be aware that they may not be thinking straight despite outside appearance. Be gentle and sensitive, but be aware that there is a shell of pretense and defensiveness that needs to be cracked before you get to the real deal. Don't be afraid to help someone peeps. Its never not worth it..
As someone who has tried suicide a number of times and has been locked up in a mental ward for nearly two months only about 3 years ago , I think it’s important to look after your friends and love ones . I wouldn’t be alive today without my wife who has looked after me through so many down periods but has stayed strong and never given up on me .
Signing up to this Saints big footy site has been great for me too . I’ve made some really great friends on here and I enjoy everyone’s company . For someone like me who struggles to keep friends in real life , it’s been a godsend to have this outlet and see so many friendly names every time I come in .

Every day is a battle for me as it is for a lot of other people. Depression never goes away , it’s a constant fight just to stay alive . Of course my back issues don’t really help my situation either but you just take it one day at a time . Refocusing of footy since I joined big footy has been a great help . It’s one of the reasons why I have enjoyed helping with things like the player advocates during the season . It gives me something to occupy my mind and my time . So at some stage during the footy season I might jump in too early to put in some details of players performance during a game . Please don’t think it’s because I disrespect anyone of you . It just helps me stay sane in my own little way .

If ever anyone has a problem like depression and wants to chat even if it’s just to ask a question or something, feel free to contact me anytime . I will help anyway I can as others have helped me .


Go Saints
 

Keg on legs

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#14
As someone who has tried suicide a number of times and has been locked up in a mental ward for nearly two months only about 3 years ago , I think it’s important to look after your friends and love ones . I wouldn’t be alive today without my wife who has looked after me through so many down periods but has stayed strong and never given up on me .
Signing up to this Saints big footy site has been great for me too . I’ve made some really great friends on here and I enjoy everyone’s company . For someone like me who struggles to keep friends in real life , it’s been a godsend to have this outlet and see so many friendly names every time I come in .

Every day is a battle for me as it is for a lot of other people. Depression never goes away , it’s a constant fight just to stay alive . Of course my back issues don’t really help my situation either but you just take it one day at a time . Refocusing of footy since I joined big footy has been a great help . It’s one of the reasons why I have enjoyed helping with things like the player advocates during the season . It gives me something to occupy my mind and my time . So at some stage during the footy season I might jump in too early to put in some details of players performance during a game . Please don’t think it’s because I disrespect anyone of you . It just helps me stay sane in my own little way .

If ever anyone has a problem like depression and wants to chat even if it’s just to ask a question or something, feel free to contact me anytime . I will help anyway I can as others have helped me .


Go Saints
Incredibly brave post BT.

I'm glad to hear you get some support from us here. We are a big crazy frustrated family us saints fans.

Your offer is reciprocal, if you ever need help or someone to talk to please reach out
 

CALL ME SNAKE

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#15
As someone who has tried suicide a number of times and has been locked up in a mental ward for nearly two months only about 3 years ago , I think it’s important to look after your friends and love ones . I wouldn’t be alive today without my wife who has looked after me through so many down periods but has stayed strong and never given up on me .
Signing up to this Saints big footy site has been great for me too . I’ve made some really great friends on here and I enjoy everyone’s company . For someone like me who struggles to keep friends in real life , it’s been a godsend to have this outlet and see so many friendly names every time I come in .

Every day is a battle for me as it is for a lot of other people. Depression never goes away , it’s a constant fight just to stay alive . Of course my back issues don’t really help my situation either but you just take it one day at a time . Refocusing of footy since I joined big footy has been a great help . It’s one of the reasons why I have enjoyed helping with things like the player advocates during the season . It gives me something to occupy my mind and my time . So at some stage during the footy season I might jump in too early to put in some details of players performance during a game . Please don’t think it’s because I disrespect anyone of you . It just helps me stay sane in my own little way .

If ever anyone has a problem like depression and wants to chat even if it’s just to ask a question or something, feel free to contact me anytime . I will help anyway I can as others have helped me .


Go Saints
Good post mate:thumbsu:
That's the thing about talking to random peeps online, it's easy to have a smartarse dig at somebody online but you never know what type of situation that person is in .
You add good value to this site and are usually pretty positive with posts about the Saints which is great to counterbalance the waves of negatively that flood this place at times.
You would definitely be missed if you ever left this place.
 

St Muir

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#16
As someone who has tried suicide a number of times and has been locked up in a mental ward for nearly two months only about 3 years ago , I think it’s important to look after your friends and love ones . I wouldn’t be alive today without my wife who has looked after me through so many down periods but has stayed strong and never given up on me .
Signing up to this Saints big footy site has been great for me too . I’ve made some really great friends on here and I enjoy everyone’s company . For someone like me who struggles to keep friends in real life , it’s been a godsend to have this outlet and see so many friendly names every time I come in .

Every day is a battle for me as it is for a lot of other people. Depression never goes away , it’s a constant fight just to stay alive . Of course my back issues don’t really help my situation either but you just take it one day at a time . Refocusing of footy since I joined big footy has been a great help . It’s one of the reasons why I have enjoyed helping with things like the player advocates during the season . It gives me something to occupy my mind and my time . So at some stage during the footy season I might jump in too early to put in some details of players performance during a game . Please don’t think it’s because I disrespect anyone of you . It just helps me stay sane in my own little way .

If ever anyone has a problem like depression and wants to chat even if it’s just to ask a question or something, feel free to contact me anytime . I will help anyway I can as others have helped me .


Go Saints
I've been tossing up whether to post on this issue but you've coaxed me out BT. I'm posting because the word 'depression' covers so many conditions, individuals and circumstances. I hope this post will be of use to someone, now or in the future.
I was oblivious to depression, other than it being something that others suffered and something that I couldn't really understand. That all changed for me one night when I got a knock on the front door and found a rather nervous police officer waiting there. As soon as he mentioned my adult son's name, I knew he was dead. My son had struggled with schizophrenia for years and had been particularly agitated by Abbott's (when this low life was PM) grandstanding about slashing the DSP and other 'benefits'. I thought I'd convinced him there was nothing to worry about but I got that wrong. My son's answer to Abbott's escalating rhetoric was to end it all by walking in front of a train.
I was shattered. My life fragmented into little pieces that just didn't relate to one another. Over time I struggled to put the pieces together but couldn't. It was like there was no 'me' left to hold all the bits together. I slowly began to understand why my son took his life and why others would do the same. I started to think that my only answer was to take my own life. It was when I started to visualise my own death, that I knew I was in trouble. I remember going to the doctor and breaking down completely. I couldn't stop crying and couldn't believe my own tears and how broken I was.
I was put on to medication and given some sleeping tablets. The sleeping tablets were a God send. I was able to sleep properly for the first time in months. I wasn't quite so keen on the other meds after a while. They helped initially but I just didn't feel myself, so I gradually got off them.
I found exercise to be really beneficial, especially when dealing with depression's evil twin, anxiety. In my case, anxiety was often the start with depression following the utter futility of not resolving the underlying issue creating the anxiety. I started off with a few walks and built up to some bid bush walks of 20 k's or so.
In the meantime, my long term de facto relationship collapsed. My son was from a previous marriage and my partner just couldn't deal with my pain and the changes in me.
Years later, I have married a fantastic woman who has two children. I feel life has given me a second chance. I'm one of the lucky ones in that the depression was brought on by circumstances. As I have painstakingly worked through the consequences of that situation, I have been able to overcome depression and create a new life. I still get echos of that feeling and have to work at it, especially not allowing anxiety to get a foothold.
While I believe I'm a much better person for the experience, I would not wish depression on anyone. It's a hell of a lot more than just feeling sad or down. It's incredibly debilitating and requires enormous reserves of strength to fight it.
I do live in hope that I will come across Tony Abbott day though....
 

CALL ME SNAKE

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#17
I've been tossing up whether to post on this issue but you've coaxed me out BT. I'm posting because the word 'depression' covers so many conditions, individuals and circumstances. I hope this post will be of use to someone, now or in the future.
I was oblivious to depression, other than it being something that others suffered and something that I couldn't really understand. That all changed for me one night when I got a knock on the front door and found a rather nervous police officer waiting there. As soon as he mentioned my adult son's name, I knew he was dead. My son had struggled with schizophrenia for years and had been particularly agitated by Abbott's (when this low life was PM) grandstanding about slashing the DSP and other 'benefits'. I thought I'd convinced him there was nothing to worry about but I got that wrong. My son's answer to Abbott's escalating rhetoric was to end it all by walking in front of a train.
I was shattered. My life fragmented into little pieces that just didn't relate to one another. Over time I struggled to put the pieces together but couldn't. It was like there was no 'me' left to hold all the bits together. I slowly began to understand why my son took his life and why others would do the same. I started to think that my only answer was to take my own life. It was when I started to visualise my own death, that I knew I was in trouble. I remember going to the doctor and breaking down completely. I couldn't stop crying and couldn't believe my own tears and how broken I was.
I was put on to medication and given some sleeping tablets. The sleeping tablets were a God send. I was able to sleep properly for the first time in months. I wasn't quite so keen on the other meds after a while. They helped initially but I just didn't feel myself, so I gradually got off them.
I found exercise to be really beneficial, especially when dealing with depression's evil twin, anxiety. In my case, anxiety was often the start with depression following the utter futility of not resolving the underlying issue creating the anxiety. I started off with a few walks and built up to some bid bush walks of 20 k's or so.
In the meantime, my long term de facto relationship collapsed. My son was from a previous marriage and my partner just couldn't deal with my pain and the changes in me.
Years later, I have married a fantastic woman who has two children. I feel life has given me a second chance. I'm one of the lucky ones in that the depression was brought on by circumstances. As I have painstakingly worked through the consequences of that situation, I have been able to overcome depression and create a new life. I still get echos of that feeling and have to work at it, especially not allowing anxiety to get a foothold.
While I believe I'm a much better person for the experience, I would not wish depression on anyone. It's a hell of a lot more than just feeling sad or down. It's incredibly debilitating and requires enormous reserves of strength to fight it.
I do live in hope that I will come across Tony Abbott day though....
Mate that is heartbreaking about your son.
But also inspirational how you have picked yourself up and started to enjoy life again.
Thanks for sharing.
 

mightymalaka

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#18
I've been tossing up whether to post on this issue but you've coaxed me out BT. I'm posting because the word 'depression' covers so many conditions, individuals and circumstances. I hope this post will be of use to someone, now or in the future.
I was oblivious to depression, other than it being something that others suffered and something that I couldn't really understand. That all changed for me one night when I got a knock on the front door and found a rather nervous police officer waiting there. As soon as he mentioned my adult son's name, I knew he was dead. My son had struggled with schizophrenia for years and had been particularly agitated by Abbott's (when this low life was PM) grandstanding about slashing the DSP and other 'benefits'. I thought I'd convinced him there was nothing to worry about but I got that wrong. My son's answer to Abbott's escalating rhetoric was to end it all by walking in front of a train.
I was shattered. My life fragmented into little pieces that just didn't relate to one another. Over time I struggled to put the pieces together but couldn't. It was like there was no 'me' left to hold all the bits together. I slowly began to understand why my son took his life and why others would do the same. I started to think that my only answer was to take my own life. It was when I started to visualise my own death, that I knew I was in trouble. I remember going to the doctor and breaking down completely. I couldn't stop crying and couldn't believe my own tears and how broken I was.
I was put on to medication and given some sleeping tablets. The sleeping tablets were a God send. I was able to sleep properly for the first time in months. I wasn't quite so keen on the other meds after a while. They helped initially but I just didn't feel myself, so I gradually got off them.
I found exercise to be really beneficial, especially when dealing with depression's evil twin, anxiety. In my case, anxiety was often the start with depression following the utter futility of not resolving the underlying issue creating the anxiety. I started off with a few walks and built up to some bid bush walks of 20 k's or so.
In the meantime, my long term de facto relationship collapsed. My son was from a previous marriage and my partner just couldn't deal with my pain and the changes in me.
Years later, I have married a fantastic woman who has two children. I feel life has given me a second chance. I'm one of the lucky ones in that the depression was brought on by circumstances. As I have painstakingly worked through the consequences of that situation, I have been able to overcome depression and create a new life. I still get echos of that feeling and have to work at it, especially not allowing anxiety to get a foothold.
While I believe I'm a much better person for the experience, I would not wish depression on anyone. It's a hell of a lot more than just feeling sad or down. It's incredibly debilitating and requires enormous reserves of strength to fight it.
I do live in hope that I will come across Tony Abbott day though....
Man! doesnt that shit put some things into perspective!
So very sorry for what you have experienced with your son mate!
Thats a whole new level of anguish you wouldnt wish upon anyone!
Remarkably brave of you to share but more importantly pick yourself up from!

You have a hell of a lot to be proud of man! quite inspirational!
Very happy to hear your doing much better these days and have found yourself a new life!
Goes to show the incredible depth of the human spirit when it is willing!

Thanks for sharing brother. Stories like yours and BT's are incredibly deep and personal
Yet even after what you have both been through, to still be looking out for others and warning of the dangers
Says so much about your character! No wonder your a Saints fan!
Thank you for sharing man and may only joy and happiness follow you wherever you go!
 

St Muir

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#19
Man! doesnt that shit put some things into perspective!
So very sorry for what you have experienced with your son mate!
Thats a whole new level of anguish you wouldnt wish upon anyone!
Remarkably brave of you to share but more importantly pick yourself up from!

You have a hell of a lot to be proud of man! quite inspirational!
Very happy to hear your doing much better these days and have found yourself a new life!
Goes to show the incredible depth of the human spirit when it is willing!

Thanks for sharing brother. Stories like yours and BT's are incredibly deep and personal
Yet even after what you have both been through, to still be looking out for others and warning of the dangers
Says so much about your character! No wonder your a Saints fan!
Thank you for sharing man and may only joy and happiness follow you wherever you go!
Thanks MM I really appreciate that.
 

Diehard Saint

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#20
Brains Trust66 and St Muir, thank you for trusting us enough to share your stories.

I cannot even begin to imagine the pain you and your families have been through. Rest assured that on this forum you will find compassionate (if anonymous) friends who have your back and will support you any way we can.

It’s funny, for all the bickering and difference of opinion, this site is like a family, each with different personalities, but this is a timely reminder that no one can tell what is happening in the lives of others...so let’s just be kind to each other.
 
Last edited:

Brains Trust66

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#22
I've been tossing up whether to post on this issue but you've coaxed me out BT. I'm posting because the word 'depression' covers so many conditions, individuals and circumstances. I hope this post will be of use to someone, now or in the future.
I was oblivious to depression, other than it being something that others suffered and something that I couldn't really understand. That all changed for me one night when I got a knock on the front door and found a rather nervous police officer waiting there. As soon as he mentioned my adult son's name, I knew he was dead. My son had struggled with schizophrenia for years and had been particularly agitated by Abbott's (when this low life was PM) grandstanding about slashing the DSP and other 'benefits'. I thought I'd convinced him there was nothing to worry about but I got that wrong. My son's answer to Abbott's escalating rhetoric was to end it all by walking in front of a train.
I was shattered. My life fragmented into little pieces that just didn't relate to one another. Over time I struggled to put the pieces together but couldn't. It was like there was no 'me' left to hold all the bits together. I slowly began to understand why my son took his life and why others would do the same. I started to think that my only answer was to take my own life. It was when I started to visualise my own death, that I knew I was in trouble. I remember going to the doctor and breaking down completely. I couldn't stop crying and couldn't believe my own tears and how broken I was.
I was put on to medication and given some sleeping tablets. The sleeping tablets were a God send. I was able to sleep properly for the first time in months. I wasn't quite so keen on the other meds after a while. They helped initially but I just didn't feel myself, so I gradually got off them.
I found exercise to be really beneficial, especially when dealing with depression's evil twin, anxiety. In my case, anxiety was often the start with depression following the utter futility of not resolving the underlying issue creating the anxiety. I started off with a few walks and built up to some bid bush walks of 20 k's or so.
In the meantime, my long term de facto relationship collapsed. My son was from a previous marriage and my partner just couldn't deal with my pain and the changes in me.
Years later, I have married a fantastic woman who has two children. I feel life has given me a second chance. I'm one of the lucky ones in that the depression was brought on by circumstances. As I have painstakingly worked through the consequences of that situation, I have been able to overcome depression and create a new life. I still get echos of that feeling and have to work at it, especially not allowing anxiety to get a foothold.
While I believe I'm a much better person for the experience, I would not wish depression on anyone. It's a hell of a lot more than just feeling sad or down. It's incredibly debilitating and requires enormous reserves of strength to fight it.
I do live in hope that I will come across Tony Abbott day though....
Thanks for posting this mate , to hear how you have survived is a great story in its self . Sometimes we think we are the only ones going through these problems, but if more people spoke up it would help a lot of us .
I wouldn’t wish depression on my worst enemy . Until you go through it yourself you have no idea what it feels like . As you said it’s got nothing to do with just feeling a bit sad .


Go Saints
 

coachnoodles

Team Captain
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St Kilda
#23
Mental Health is a huge issue but one that we are slowly getting better at addressing. It was a huge focus at the club I was involved in for the last 5 years after the club lost 3 people to suicide about 10 ago.

Club has its own mental health fund to anonymously support anyone within the club network that needs help.

The players even put this video together to help create awareness.

Great to see it being spoken about on here - look after youselves and each other people.

 

St Muir

Senior List
Joined
Oct 18, 2018
Posts
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AFL Club
St Kilda
#24
Mental Health is a huge issue but one that we are slowly getting better at addressing. It was a huge focus at the club I was involved in for the last 5 years after the club lost 3 people to suicide about 10 ago.

Club has its own mental health fund to anonymously support anyone within the club network that needs help.

The players even put this video together to help create awareness.

Great to see it being spoken about on here - look after youselves and each other people.

Keep up the good work mate!
Thanks to everyone for their kind words and support. You’re a fantastic group of people and your positive contributions do make a difference. Thank you!
 

st_trav_ofWA

Premiership Player
Joined
Aug 17, 2015
Posts
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#25
I've been tossing up whether to post on this issue but you've coaxed me out BT. I'm posting because the word 'depression' covers so many conditions, individuals and circumstances. I hope this post will be of use to someone, now or in the future.
I was oblivious to depression, other than it being something that others suffered and something that I couldn't really understand. That all changed for me one night when I got a knock on the front door and found a rather nervous police officer waiting there. As soon as he mentioned my adult son's name, I knew he was dead. My son had struggled with schizophrenia for years and had been particularly agitated by Abbott's (when this low life was PM) grandstanding about slashing the DSP and other 'benefits'. I thought I'd convinced him there was nothing to worry about but I got that wrong. My son's answer to Abbott's escalating rhetoric was to end it all by walking in front of a train.
I was shattered. My life fragmented into little pieces that just didn't relate to one another. Over time I struggled to put the pieces together but couldn't. It was like there was no 'me' left to hold all the bits together. I slowly began to understand why my son took his life and why others would do the same. I started to think that my only answer was to take my own life. It was when I started to visualise my own death, that I knew I was in trouble. I remember going to the doctor and breaking down completely. I couldn't stop crying and couldn't believe my own tears and how broken I was.
I was put on to medication and given some sleeping tablets. The sleeping tablets were a God send. I was able to sleep properly for the first time in months. I wasn't quite so keen on the other meds after a while. They helped initially but I just didn't feel myself, so I gradually got off them.
I found exercise to be really beneficial, especially when dealing with depression's evil twin, anxiety. In my case, anxiety was often the start with depression following the utter futility of not resolving the underlying issue creating the anxiety. I started off with a few walks and built up to some bid bush walks of 20 k's or so.
In the meantime, my long term de facto relationship collapsed. My son was from a previous marriage and my partner just couldn't deal with my pain and the changes in me.
Years later, I have married a fantastic woman who has two children. I feel life has given me a second chance. I'm one of the lucky ones in that the depression was brought on by circumstances. As I have painstakingly worked through the consequences of that situation, I have been able to overcome depression and create a new life. I still get echos of that feeling and have to work at it, especially not allowing anxiety to get a foothold.
While I believe I'm a much better person for the experience, I would not wish depression on anyone. It's a hell of a lot more than just feeling sad or down. It's incredibly debilitating and requires enormous reserves of strength to fight it.
I do live in hope that I will come across Tony Abbott day though....
wow mate that takes a lot to share ... really glad that you have come through the other side ...
I totally get the Tony Abbott feeling
 
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