Current National Public Register of Child Sex Offenders

Do you think a public register you can access is a good idea?

  • Yes.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes and I want alerts every time someone is registered.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes but will everyone see my old carnal knowledge conviction? She told me she was 16yo.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Yes but vigilantism is a concern.

    Votes: 1 33.3%
  • Yes, provided the evidence shows it to be effective.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No. It isn't going to end well.

    Votes: 2 66.7%
  • No.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    3

shellyg

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Child sex offenders could have their names and photos uploaded to a public register in what is being described as the "toughest crackdown on paedophiles" in Australian history.

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton has written to states and territories urging them to support his proposal for a national database, saying parents should be able to see if sex criminals live nearby.

Details that could be included on the website include an offender's name, date of birth, photo, the nature of their offending, and their general location, such as their postcode.

States and territories would feed information into the national database, meaning the Commonwealth would need their support.
In Western Australia, people can search for dangerous and high-risk offenders who live in the suburb and adjoining suburbs

It is unclear whether all perpetrators would be listed or only those who committed certain types of offences.
Offenders under the age of 18 would not have their details on the register.

Derryn Hinch wants register named after Daniel Morcombe

"I can die happy, this is the only reason I got into politics," Senator Hinch said of the announcement.
He said any new legislation should be known as 'Daniel's Law' — named after Queensland 13-year-old Daniel Morcombe, who was abducted and murdered by sex offender Brett Cowan in 2003.

While welcoming the plan, the Justice Party representative said it should go further and include offenders' addresses.

Daniel Morcombe's mother, Denise Morcombe, said the register was a "fantastic" plan.

Ms Morcombe said the register would help parents and carers better protect their children by allowing people to know how many registered offenders are in their area.

She said it would also help protect single mothers who may be trying to find a new partner online.

"If they meet someone, they'll be able to put that person's name into the website and see if this person is a serious offender or not."
But child safety advocate Hetty Johnson from Bravehearts suggested the proposal was more about winning votes than protecting children.

"It's a bit of a chest-beating exercise that will lead to nothing."

Ms Johnson warned that only 10 per cent of child sex offenders were known to authorities.

Concerns raised over possibility of vigilante attacks

The Australian Institute of Criminology, which reports to the Home Affairs Minister, last year published a research paper that found "the effectiveness of public sex offender registries [is] mixed".

"While public sex offender registries may have a small general deterrent effect on first-time offenders, they do not reduce recidivism," the authors wrote.

Federal Labor said it was important any changes were "evidence-based and effective".
"Mr Dutton must show how this makes children safer," shadow attorney-general Mark Dreyfus said.​
"When this was raised a few years ago, then-prime minister [Tony] Abbott rejected it.

"It would be good to know what has changed since then."

President of the Law Council of Australia, Arthur Moses SC, said while he supported the idea of a register in principle, he believed names should only be added at the discretion of a sentencing court, rather than on an automatic basis.

He also said he was concerned about potential vigilante attacks on listed offenders.

"We need to make sure people do not commit offences as they potentially engage in some form of retribution in relation to these offenders," Mr Moses said.

He said the establishment of similar registers in the United States had shown they "do not necessarily prevent sex offending in the general community".

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-01...s-national-database-of-sex-offenders/10701202
 

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shellyg

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In related news, this man was moved into a street full of women and children.

A supervision order dictating living arrangements and curfews for serial sex offender Robert John Fardon has been lifted by a Queensland court.

A decision to lift the order was handed down by Justice Helen Bowskill last week, but media were asked to leave the hearing and blocked from accessing and reporting her ruling.

The order was made public this morning.

Timeline:

1967 - Convicted at 18 for attempted carnal knowledge of a girl under 10. Released on a good behaviour bond.

1978 - Raped a 12-year-old girl, wounded her sister. Fled to the Northern Territory but was caught and jailed.

1988 - Broke parole by travelling to Townsville. Violently raped and assaulted a woman. Sent back to jail.

2003 - Became the first person in Queensland to be jailed indefinitely under new laws targeting repeat sex offenders.

2006 - Released on a supervision order with 32 conditions.

2007 - Breached the order by going to a school, breaching curfew and travelling to Townsville. He's briefly returned to prison before released in October.

2008 - Re-arrested over rape of a 61-year-old intellectually disabled woman.

2010 - Sentenced to 10 years' jail for the rape. The conviction was quashed on appeal a few months later but Fardon remained in jail due to other earlier breaches of a supervision order.

2011 - Government launches lengthy court battle to keep him in jail.

2013 - Released on supervision order.

2014 - Brief return to prison before court orders Fardon's release into supervised accommodation.

2018, September - Queensland government rushes through new child sex offender laws which automatically apply tough monitoring and reporting conditions to repeat offenders.

2018, November - Queensland government makes a court bid for Fardon to remain monitored by a supervision order under the Dangerous Prisoners (Sexual Offenders) Act 2003.

2019 - Court dismisses Queensland government's application for a further supervision order under that act. Fardon will still be monitored by police under the new legislation.

https://www.9news.com.au/2019/01/16...-serial-sex-offender-supervision-order-lifted
 
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