Toast New Indigenous strip

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Thread starter #1
is sick.



It is boring seeing us in the same two jumpers every single match, and then getting a trainwreck on the one or two times we change to it (that first game at Optus one was like a kid's idea and dad, who's a screenwriter, has made one up for him). But I love how we maintain the same look for the Indigenous jumpers – three boomerangs on all of them, and in six or seven years we've only had two designs and just flipped the colours every season. It's a nice break from clubs chopping and changing and barely resembling themselves.

But the best thing is the nod this:



With even a little bit o:


Love the retro reference with the central strip bit. Cookie designed it (again?) and I wonder if he had a bout of nostalgia to inspire it.

Hopefully we see another classic jumper appear sometime this season...
 

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Okinakashi

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#2
100% agree. It's brilliant.

I'd like to hear the story behind it. I was a corporate guest at an indigenous round game a few years ago and Roger Hayden and SHilly explained the meaning behind the different patterns and pictures on the Jumper.

Hopefully we'll get more explanation as the round gets closer.
 

Cameron_K

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#5
Yeah Cook mentioned it was based around his Carnarvon upbringing. The river and the foot prints of the animals they would hunt as well as getting permisision once again for the inclusion flower to be on the jumper. Also said there was a small dragon (maybe flower) as he was born in the year of the dragon and Asian heritage he has.
 

BlueE

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#9
100% agree. It's brilliant.

I'd like to hear the story behind it. I was a corporate guest at an indigenous round game a few years ago and Roger Hayden and SHilly explained the meaning behind the different patterns and pictures on the Jumper.

Hopefully we'll get more explanation as the round gets closer.
https://www.fremantlefc.com.au/news/2019-03-12/indigenous-jumper

Cook, who grew up in Carnarvon 1000km north of Perth, utilised the landmarks, fauna and cultural connections that have had a lasting impression on his life.

The 150-game player for Fremantle said the Gascoyne River is the central feature of the jumper.

“The middle feature is the Gascoyne River with 25 River Mullet, symbolising the 25-year history of the Fremantle Football Club,” Cook said.

“The river was my oasis. Spearing, lashing, fishing and swimming with family and friends was a regular occurrence.

“The Gascoyne is not a flowing river but to witness the river coming down after heavy rains inland is an amazing experience which brings the surrounding area to life.

“Either side of the river are the tracks of a kangaroo, emu and goanna. Each was hunted as a respected food source for many families. The animals survive around the permanent water holes.

“The Gascoyne’s language groups are acknowledged and represented in people meeting around a fire. They represent the groups that remain and also those who have passed through over time.”

The jumper also represents the multicultural background of many Australians, including Cook.

“This guernsey acknowledges a part of who I am and where I come from,” Cook said.

“I was born in the Year of the Dragon. At the bottom right of the guernsey is the character of the Dragon, representing my Grandfather’s Chinese heritage, on my mother’s side.

The jumper will once again feature the Sorry Day Flower

The club is honoured to have once again been given permission by the Kimberley Stolen Generation Aboriginal Corporation to feature the Sorry Day Flower on this guernsey.

The flower represents the native hibiscus, which survives in harsh conditions and is a symbol of strength, resilience, compassion and understanding with the purple colour also symbolising healing.

Fremantle’s coaching, football and off-field staff will also wear the Sorry Day Flower pin on their lapel during Sir Doug Nicholls Round in unity with our playing group.
 
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