Society/Culture Should cannabis be legalised?

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Caesar

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Mar 3, 2005
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Decriminalised, yes. Legalised, I'm less sold on.

Decriminalisation without outright legalisation seems to do the job pretty well in most places (e.g. the Netherlands). I'm happy to go with that.
 

skilts

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No! To do so would mean the end of my very lucrative business. If anyone detects an element of self-interest in this, they're correct. Look after number 14, I say.
 

IAMJUNGLEMUFFIN

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It's good fun, and quite fine on the odd occasion. Problem is, for a lot of people it turns out to be every day instead of the odd occasion.

The reputation it has as being a soft drug is very misleading. It can sill take over your life like mst other drugs, but is alot more dangerous because it's not feared and respected for the damage it can do and the addictive properties it actually does possess.

Am quite open to it, done it countless times myself, and will do it again, still, voted no.
 

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vealesy

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It's good fun, and quite fine on the odd occasion. Problem is, for a lot of people it turns out to be every day instead of the odd occasion.

The reputation it has as being a soft drug is very misleading. It can sill take over your life like mst other drugs, but is alot more dangerous because it's not feared and respected for the damage it can do and the addictive properties it actually does possess.

Am quite open to it, done it countless times myself, and will do it again, still, voted no.
Prove the bolded parts please.
 

WowsersTrousers

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weed, speed, diet pills (uppers), mushrooms, googs, cocaine, acid etc...

basically everything bar maybe heroin (im fine with opium though)...

weed would be at the bottom of my list though, its probably the least fun of all drugs...

when i bought mushrooms in the netherlands years ago, it came with a set of instructions on what to do if you're uncomfortable during your trip, what to do if you want a more intense feeling, how to ingest the mushrooms etc... they are now banned because some french girl died while on them, but there were suggestions that they should be legal, but to obtain them you have to go to a coffee shop and place your order, they give you the instructions and you go away for 2 days, before coming back and picking up the goods...

id be happy with a similar approach to most drugs in australia...

if nothing else, it would boost the party tourism economy and cut down on gangs etc ;)
 

Pie eyed

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It's good fun, and quite fine on the odd occasion. Problem is, for a lot of people it turns out to be every day instead of the odd occasion.

The reputation it has as being a soft drug is very misleading. It can sill take over your life like mst other drugs, but is alot more dangerous because it's not feared and respected for the damage it can do and the addictive properties it actually does possess.

Am quite open to it, done it countless times myself, and will do it again, still, voted no.
People can have issues with any drug. Even Coffee.
 

OldBlueFan

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Sep 23, 2009
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The thing that always strikes me about this debate is how simple-mindedly most people treat it.

Eg. "X% of people have issues with addictive behaviour, so ban everything in an attempt to prevent their problem from manifesting".

I always wonder how much better a society we'd be living in if the ridiculous amounts of money spent on the drug war were redirected into services that helped people to develop the skills they need to cope better with life and thus reduce their tendency toward substance aduse.

I would think that a society that took this approach would implement strategies that affect people at a young age (when they are most impressionable) before potential issues with addiction are even explicitly visible. Therefore, life skills and emotional development improvements would be felt by all of society.

You can easily imagine a world where bullying, violent behaviour, obesity, alcoholism, binge-drinking, teenage suicide etc etc AND drug abuse are all reduced (not eradicated, because there will always be people beyond help).

Given that emotional imbalance is at the core of most of these problems, why aren't we seeking to implement strategies which improve that emotional balance for folks? Like every other problem in western society, the majority only want to treat the symptoms, never look at the cause.
 

Pie eyed

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The thing that always strikes me about this debate is how simple-mindedly most people treat it.

Eg. "X% of people have issues with addictive behaviour, so ban everything in an attempt to prevent their problem from manifesting".

I always wonder how much better a society we'd be living in if the ridiculous amounts of money spent on the drug war were redirected into services that helped people to develop the skills they need to cope better with life and thus reduce their tendency toward substance aduse.

I would think that a society that took this approach would implement strategies that affect people at a young age (when they are most impressionable) before potential issues with addiction are even explicitly visible. Therefore, life skills and emotional development improvements would be felt by all of society.

You can easily imagine a world where bullying, violent behaviour, obesity, alcoholism, binge-drinking, teenage suicide etc etc AND drug abuse are all reduced (not eradicated, because there will always be people beyond help).

Given that emotional imbalance is at the core of most of these problems, why aren't we seeking to implement strategies which improve that emotional balance for folks? Like every other problem in western society, the majority only want to treat the symptoms, never look at the cause.
Good post.
Agree completely.
 

Daytripper

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The thing that always strikes me about this debate is how simple-mindedly most people treat it.
Agree 100%.

Its a bit of a joke topic though, isn't it.

Firstly, nobody goes to jail in Australia for the sole crime of using drugs - especially cannabis. If you know of anyone, then let me know because that person would be the unluckiest person in the country.

Secondly, its quasi legal anyway. Generally offenders are issued with a caution and no conviction is recorded.

Yet, proponents of legalisation will always unfailingly try the "OMG, people might go to jail for having a joint at a dinner party"
Which is absolute trite garbage.

And as OBF stated, its incredible how simplistically people look at this issue - understandable in a way as most people who advocate legalisation are heavy users themselves so their ability to think cognitively is affected.

There are all sorts of issues to consider here.
Is it a state issue or a Federal issue for one? You would imagine its Federal as it would require some co-operation internationally. And considering our neighbours policies on drugs the chances of co-operation would be somewhere between zero and zero.

What about supply outside the law - is that a Federal issue or state issue.

Liability - whose responsibility is it if a user is impacted pyschologically from state sponsored cannabis. What about if that user causes harm to someone else?
Because without a doubt in the world there would be lawsuits coming.

And please if anyone wants to argue that excessive marijuana use does not have some psychological impacts then don't bother. It would be obvious, that either you are a) already brain f**ked or b) incapable of coherent thought.

One more thing - I always find it laughable how Netherlands is brought up. Whilst the tourists and the kiddies love the law the people who actually live in the country are increasingly tiring of it.

Also it is one country out almost 200.
Shall we bring in amputation of the hands for thieves because Saudi Arabia does it?
What about stoning women who commit adultery?

Anyway, I'm sure the usual suspects will put down their bong for a minute or two and try and argue their case. I don't know why they bother as the law will never get changed in this country.

Actually I don't know why I bother even arguing for the silent majority either.....its obviously going to fall on deaf ears.
 

Pie eyed

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Agree 100%.

Its a bit of a joke topic though, isn't it.

Firstly, nobody goes to jail in Australia for the sole crime of using drugs - especially cannabis. If you know of anyone, then let me know because that person would be the unluckiest person in the country.

Secondly, its quasi legal anyway. Generally offenders are issued with a caution and no conviction is recorded.

Yet, proponents of legalisation will always unfailingly try the "OMG, people might go to jail for having a joint at a dinner party"
Which is absolute trite garbage.

And as OBF stated, its incredible how simplistically people look at this issue - understandable in a way as most people who advocate legalisation are heavy users themselves so their ability to think cognitively is affected.

There are all sorts of issues to consider here.
Is it a state issue or a Federal issue for one? You would imagine its Federal as it would require some co-operation internationally. And considering our neighbours policies on drugs the chances of co-operation would be somewhere between zero and zero.

What about supply outside the law - is that a Federal issue or state issue.

Liability - whose responsibility is it if a user is impacted pyschologically from state sponsored cannabis. What about if that user causes harm to someone else?
Because without a doubt in the world there would be lawsuits coming.

And please if anyone wants to argue that excessive marijuana use does not have some psychological impacts then don't bother. It would be obvious, that either you are a) already brain f**ked or b) incapable of coherent thought.

One more thing - I always find it laughable how Netherlands is brought up. Whilst the tourists and the kiddies love the law the people who actually live in the country are increasingly tiring of it.

Also it is one country out almost 200.
Shall we bring in amputation of the hands for thieves because Saudi Arabia does it?
What about stoning women who commit adultery?

Anyway, I'm sure the usual suspects will put down their bong for a minute or two and try and argue their case. I don't know why they bother as the law will never get changed in this country.

Actually I don't know why I bother even arguing for the silent majority either.....its obviously going to fall on deaf ears.
Your rants never fail to amuse DT.:thumbsu::D

What are you so damned scared of?
People making their own decisions...I just don't get the panic grass generates in some people.

Legal, decriminalized or illegal it makes no difference.
People who want to smoke it, smoke it.

The point is the vast sea of money wasted "combating" it's use, enforcing it's legal status and the associated advertising would be better spent on other things.

Mental Health is one which your posting brings to mind.;)
 

Daytripper

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Your rants never fail to amuse DT.:thumbsu::D

What are you so damned scared of?
People making their own decisions...I just don't get the panic grass generates in some people.

Legal, decriminalized or illegal it makes no difference.
People who want to smoke it, smoke it.

The point is the vast sea of money wasted "combating" it's use, enforcing it's legal status and the associated advertising would be better spent on other things.

Mental Health is one which your posting brings to mind.;)
What am I sacred of?

Well, quite obviously a larger potential mental health issue. Please don't tell me you are one of those who think there are no causal links. Because I would have to readjust my guarded respect for your musings otherwise.

And what exactly is this vast sea of money you speak of?
Cannabis users don't go to jail, they hardly ever appear in the court system - can you actually be a bit precise as to how much money is spent specifically going after the cannabis trade?
Is vast 100K or 100M or 1K ????:confused:

And I'm not quite certain what you are referring to when you say 'advertising'. Again can you be a bit more specific?

I also note with interest your failure to address any of the issues I raised - again this is not a simplistic issue. There are a whole range of considerations that matter here.

Just stating "yeah, it feels good so we should all use it" belongs in kindergarten to be frank.
 

Cap

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No it shouldn't be.

but if the it does happen, it should only be in the natural form it once was, not the manufactured form it now is.

Lets face it, if we go with Cannabis, why not just open it up to everything and anything.
 

Upton Sinclair

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Agree 100%.

Its a bit of a joke topic though, isn't it.

Firstly, nobody goes to jail in Australia for the sole crime of using drugs - especially cannabis. If you know of anyone, then let me know because that person would be the unluckiest person in the country.

Secondly, its quasi legal anyway. Generally offenders are issued with a caution and no conviction is recorded.

Yet, proponents of legalisation will always unfailingly try the "OMG, people might go to jail for having a joint at a dinner party"
Which is absolute trite garbage.

And as OBF stated, its incredible how simplistically people look at this issue - understandable in a way as most people who advocate legalisation are heavy users themselves so their ability to think cognitively is affected.

There are all sorts of issues to consider here.
Is it a state issue or a Federal issue for one? You would imagine its Federal as it would require some co-operation internationally. And considering our neighbours policies on drugs the chances of co-operation would be somewhere between zero and zero.

What about supply outside the law - is that a Federal issue or state issue.

Liability - whose responsibility is it if a user is impacted pyschologically from state sponsored cannabis. What about if that user causes harm to someone else?
Because without a doubt in the world there would be lawsuits coming.

And please if anyone wants to argue that excessive marijuana use does not have some psychological impacts then don't bother. It would be obvious, that either you are a) already brain f**ked or b) incapable of coherent thought.

One more thing - I always find it laughable how Netherlands is brought up. Whilst the tourists and the kiddies love the law the people who actually live in the country are increasingly tiring of it.

Also it is one country out almost 200.
Shall we bring in amputation of the hands for thieves because Saudi Arabia does it?
What about stoning women who commit adultery?

Anyway, I'm sure the usual suspects will put down their bong for a minute or two and try and argue their case. I don't know why they bother as the law will never get changed in this country.

Actually I don't know why I bother even arguing for the silent majority either.....its obviously going to fall on deaf ears.
http://i207.photobucket.com/albums/bb299/DoubleJayAlum/not_this_s**t_again.jpg
 

Admiral Byng

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No it shouldn't be.

but if the it does happen, it should only be in the natural form it once was, not the manufactured form it now is.

Lets face it, if we go with Cannabis, why not just open it up to everything and anything.
That's a cop-out. Surely we are clever enough to consider different categories of drugs separately, and legislate accordingly. It's just too simplistic to lump everything together.
 
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