Unsolved Taman Shud Case

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Team Captain
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This documentary is very interesting and interviews some of Jo's friends.
A few interesting back stories are added by this.
Jessica's sister Ellen brings up Jessie's involvement with Manning Clark
And
Tim Edhouse brings up communist party affiliation of his grandmother, and how Jessica spent a lot of time with his mother, Margaret Langley

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Redacted

Team Captain
Sep 16, 2019
545
620
AFL Club
West Coast
This documentary is very interesting and interviews some of Jo's friends.
A few interesting back stories are added by this.
Jessica's sister Ellen brings up Jessie's involvement with Manning Clark
And
Tim Edhouse brings up communist party affiliation of his grandmother, and how Jessica spent a lot of time with his mother, Margaret Langley

Sent from my SM-A305YN using Tapatalk
OK was thinking although the documentary gave some clue that might potentially link Jessie Harkness to the CPA in some way, I thought what there was in the documentary would probably be too hard to nail down, after all we only were told that Jessie knocked around with Margaret Langley but didn't give us her mom's name. There were few details about the Langley family.
Anyhow I looked up Margaret's sister, and I found something that she said that might help understand what Tim Edhouse was going on about.

"
Jean Langley was born on a Rationalist Society commune in Mentone in 1926. Her father, John Samuel Langley was English. Born in 1889, he came to Australia in 1912. After arriving in Perth he became a schoolteacher and took up public soapbox lecturing. He was atheist and an impressive speaker. The Victorian Rationalist Association became aware of his heard of him and invited him to Melbourne - an invitation he accepted. The Association was founded in 1906. Its fundamental view was that all significant beliefs and actions should be based on reason and evidence. It aimed to promote critical enquiry into religion and what it perceived as other superstitious practices, stimulate freedom of thought, and encourage interest in science, criticism and philosophy. In 1919 he became the Associations Secretary. In 1924 he founded the Rationalist Journal, and in 1926 he became the inaugural Secretary of the Rationalists Society of Australia. Jean's mother was Vera Lucy Savige. She was born in Elsternwick in 1892 and met Jean's father through the Society. She was already a Society member, and at the age of twenty-two, on their Board of Directors. They married and lived on a Rationalist commune at Mentone. Several families lived there, on a ti-tree covered ten-acre property by the sea. Jean was born in 11th of January, 1926. She was the third of the five Langley children



Jean Langley (centre) at the Rationalist Commune at Mentone c.1931

Reflecting on her parents, Jean said, "My father was very English; proper, reserved and formal, and very gentle. The most we got in the way of a hug was a pat on the head. I liked him immensely. My mother was very gentle and kind. She wasn't the greatest housekeeper in the world, but would read at least a dozen books a week. She was well-educated and proofread all of my father's writings. On many nights they'd be in the study for hours, going through whatever he was working on. She wrote poems and stories herself. She was a literary lady of that passionate left-wing world which followed the Depression". Recalling her life on the commune, she said, "Our home was full of Rationalists and very interesting people; the conversation and discussions were vital and marvellously passionate. I may not have understood much of it, but I loved the atmosphere. Mentone wasn't that far from town and people would drive down from the city. Being a celebrant, my father married many rationalists in our house. It was a jolly place as much as anything else; serious and jolly. As our family grew, and by the time my parents had the five of us, we needed somewhere bigger to live, so they rented another place in Mentone. My parents never owned a house in their lives, because they didn't believe in it. They were Socialists. Everything was on principle. They never owned or drove a car. As children, we girls weren't given dolls or other 'girly' things, and the boys weren't allowed to have guns or war-like toys. We were just given books and more books. While my mother was a feminist and a communist, my father was not a communist, though perhaps a little 'pink'. He believed in changing the world through education". Jean loved her childhood. She said, "I spent all the time at the beach...We were dreamy little kids...as free as seagulls. I ran wild on the beach. I was popular because I was so much a madcap, and a witty and sharp little thing. How could they not like me? There was little control over us. We were given an extraordinary amount of freedom, which was wonderful. My parents believed in responsibility; I was responsible for my two younger siblings, and so on. We were taught that we had a responsibility to neighbours and society, and to ideals. The only thing we had to abide by was the truth. My father believed that children should be taught to be civilized. The Society"s principle was that one should not live with the threat of Hell and the promise of Heaven, but to do good because good is good to do. That was the sort of principle that guided their lives and our".


The Langley family, from the right, John, Jean, Elizabeth, Vera, Bob and Margaret at Mentone c.1932


Jean began her schooling at Mentone State School. She recalled, "At School there were these five children with a mad English father who lectured every Sunday night saying, 'Why believe in God?' and this sort of thing, and a mother who strode around with superior airs, and a cigarette in her hand. It made the ordinary state school kids look upon us as if we came from another planet". Jean progressed to Mordialloc High School. Remembering school, she said, "I wasn't a good student, and I didn't get any certificates of any sort, much like it had been at primary school. There were pranks, like hiding underneath the school, and going down the creek in a broken-down boat and nearly drowning. There were endless adventures; it was a continuation of the madcap spirit, but I was always interested in art. From the moment I can remember, I was drawing and planning on becoming an artist. It was my whole dream; a dream which was very foreign to my parent".. Jean left school in the early days of the War and worked as a telephonist. Wanting to be an artist, she applied for a position at Manton's department store in Bourke Street in their advertising department. They trained artists to be commercial artists. Jean took in some of her drawings and they accepted her. Jean said, "At Mantons, I trained in fashion drawing, but I didn't like it much. I got bored sitting at a desk...I talked my way into the display department. We made all the prop ourselves. We'd do drawings for the window displays, and that sort of thing. It might take a month to make a window display. I loved it". Jean was at Manton's for about two years. She lived in bungalows and rooms in inner-city Melbourne in places like St. Kilda and Prahran, saying, "We all lived like that. Melbourne was...full of people living around the city, which is very different to today"


Jean and Bob Langley at Mentone beach c.1948

It was while Jean was at Manton's that she got, as she said, very carried away with the idea of being a serious artist. "I was getting a broader feeling about art and people in the art world. Cinders Coffee Lounge was a meeting place.
"
Sourced and extract taken from >


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Team Captain
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OK was thinking although the documentary gave some clue that might potentially link Jessie Harkness to the CPA in some way, I thought what there was in the documentary would probably be too hard to nail down, after all we only were told that Jessie knocked around with Margaret Langley but didn't give us her mom's name. There were few details about the Langley family.
Anyhow I looked up Margaret's sister, and I found something that she said that might help understand what Tim Edhouse was going on about.

"
Jean Langley was born on a Rationalist Society commune in Mentone in 1926. Her father, John Samuel Langley was English. Born in 1889, he came to Australia in 1912. After arriving in Perth he became a schoolteacher and took up public soapbox lecturing. He was atheist and an impressive speaker. The Victorian Rationalist Association became aware of his heard of him and invited him to Melbourne - an invitation he accepted. The Association was founded in 1906. Its fundamental view was that all significant beliefs and actions should be based on reason and evidence. It aimed to promote critical enquiry into religion and what it perceived as other superstitious practices, stimulate freedom of thought, and encourage interest in science, criticism and philosophy. In 1919 he became the Associations Secretary. In 1924 he founded the Rationalist Journal, and in 1926 he became the inaugural Secretary of the Rationalists Society of Australia. Jean's mother was Vera Lucy Savige. She was born in Elsternwick in 1892 and met Jean's father through the Society. She was already a Society member, and at the age of twenty-two, on their Board of Directors. They married and lived on a Rationalist commune at Mentone. Several families lived there, on a ti-tree covered ten-acre property by the sea. Jean was born in 11th of January, 1926. She was the third of the five Langley children



Jean Langley (centre) at the Rationalist Commune at Mentone c.1931

Reflecting on her parents, Jean said, "My father was very English; proper, reserved and formal, and very gentle. The most we got in the way of a hug was a pat on the head. I liked him immensely. My mother was very gentle and kind. She wasn't the greatest housekeeper in the world, but would read at least a dozen books a week. She was well-educated and proofread all of my father's writings. On many nights they'd be in the study for hours, going through whatever he was working on. She wrote poems and stories herself. She was a literary lady of that passionate left-wing world which followed the Depression". Recalling her life on the commune, she said, "Our home was full of Rationalists and very interesting people; the conversation and discussions were vital and marvellously passionate. I may not have understood much of it, but I loved the atmosphere. Mentone wasn't that far from town and people would drive down from the city. Being a celebrant, my father married many rationalists in our house. It was a jolly place as much as anything else; serious and jolly. As our family grew, and by the time my parents had the five of us, we needed somewhere bigger to live, so they rented another place in Mentone. My parents never owned a house in their lives, because they didn't believe in it. They were Socialists. Everything was on principle. They never owned or drove a car. As children, we girls weren't given dolls or other 'girly' things, and the boys weren't allowed to have guns or war-like toys. We were just given books and more books. While my mother was a feminist and a communist, my father was not a communist, though perhaps a little 'pink'. He believed in changing the world through education". Jean loved her childhood. She said, "I spent all the time at the beach...We were dreamy little kids...as free as seagulls. I ran wild on the beach. I was popular because I was so much a madcap, and a witty and sharp little thing. How could they not like me? There was little control over us. We were given an extraordinary amount of freedom, which was wonderful. My parents believed in responsibility; I was responsible for my two younger siblings, and so on. We were taught that we had a responsibility to neighbours and society, and to ideals. The only thing we had to abide by was the truth. My father believed that children should be taught to be civilized. The Society"s principle was that one should not live with the threat of Hell and the promise of Heaven, but to do good because good is good to do. That was the sort of principle that guided their lives and our".


The Langley family, from the right, John, Jean, Elizabeth, Vera, Bob and Margaret at Mentone c.1932


Jean began her schooling at Mentone State School. She recalled, "At School there were these five children with a mad English father who lectured every Sunday night saying, 'Why believe in God?' and this sort of thing, and a mother who strode around with superior airs, and a cigarette in her hand. It made the ordinary state school kids look upon us as if we came from another planet". Jean progressed to Mordialloc High School. Remembering school, she said, "I wasn't a good student, and I didn't get any certificates of any sort, much like it had been at primary school. There were pranks, like hiding underneath the school, and going down the creek in a broken-down boat and nearly drowning. There were endless adventures; it was a continuation of the madcap spirit, but I was always interested in art. From the moment I can remember, I was drawing and planning on becoming an artist. It was my whole dream; a dream which was very foreign to my parent".. Jean left school in the early days of the War and worked as a telephonist. Wanting to be an artist, she applied for a position at Manton's department store in Bourke Street in their advertising department. They trained artists to be commercial artists. Jean took in some of her drawings and they accepted her. Jean said, "At Mantons, I trained in fashion drawing, but I didn't like it much. I got bored sitting at a desk...I talked my way into the display department. We made all the prop ourselves. We'd do drawings for the window displays, and that sort of thing. It might take a month to make a window display. I loved it". Jean was at Manton's for about two years. She lived in bungalows and rooms in inner-city Melbourne in places like St. Kilda and Prahran, saying, "We all lived like that. Melbourne was...full of people living around the city, which is very different to today"


Jean and Bob Langley at Mentone beach c.1948

It was while Jean was at Manton's that she got, as she said, very carried away with the idea of being a serious artist. "I was getting a broader feeling about art and people in the art world. Cinders Coffee Lounge was a meeting place.
"
Sourced and extract taken from >


Sent from my SM-A305YN using Tapatalk
So what's the Rationalist Society?
How does it fit with the Somerton Man Mystery?
We'll start upon a journey to the commune at Mentone. This is where Jessie Harkness found her solice in her childhood. Where her best friend lived and who's house she frequented.. this was where she ran to when she was pregnant. It's probably where she spent holidays when she had a break in Sydney. It would've been where she first encountered the Rubyiat of Omar Khayyám from her best friend's mother....

Extract from https://www.rationalist.com.au/about-us/the-rationalist-collection/

In 1919, noted public speaker, John Samuel Langley, was appointed as Secretary of the VRA. He founded the Rationalist Journal in 1924 and became the inaugural Secretary of the RSA upon its formation in 1926. Langley continued expanding the Rationalist Library through donations and in 1934 established it as a Lending Library and Reading Room in Melbourne’s CBD.

Attached from http://search.slv.vic.gov.au/permalink/f/1o9hq1f/SLV_ROSETTAIE2500117 is a pamphlet written by John Samuel Langley called "Why I became a Rationalist lecturer"

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View attachment 1149399
 
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Team Captain
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Jessica's childhood best friend Margaret Langley's married name is Cohen.

There might be multiple reasons that Jessie Thomson is buried in the Jewish section of the cemetery, but her best friend donating a pre paid plot could be one of them.

It's simple and doesn't require Mrs Thomson to be part of any secretive Jewish underground Nazi hunter assassination squad nor even to of been converted to Judaism.

I think we now have a potentially simple explanation for the enigma of where she was buried.

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Last edited:

Gordon1552

Senior List
Oct 7, 2019
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OK was thinking although the documentary gave some clue that might potentially link Jessie Harkness to the CPA in some way, I thought what there was in the documentary would probably be too hard to nail down, after all we only were told that Jessie knocked around with Margaret Langley but didn't give us her mom's name. There were few details about the Langley family.
Anyhow I looked up Margaret's sister, and I found something that she said that might help understand what Tim Edhouse was going on about.

"
Jean Langley was born on a Rationalist Society commune in Mentone in 1926. Her father, John Samuel Langley was English. Born in 1889, he came to Australia in 1912. After arriving in Perth he became a schoolteacher and took up public soapbox lecturing. He was atheist and an impressive speaker. The Victorian Rationalist Association became aware of his heard of him and invited him to Melbourne - an invitation he accepted. The Association was founded in 1906. Its fundamental view was that all significant beliefs and actions should be based on reason and evidence. It aimed to promote critical enquiry into religion and what it perceived as other superstitious practices, stimulate freedom of thought, and encourage interest in science, criticism and philosophy. In 1919 he became the Associations Secretary. In 1924 he founded the Rationalist Journal, and in 1926 he became the inaugural Secretary of the Rationalists Society of Australia. Jean's mother was Vera Lucy Savige. She was born in Elsternwick in 1892 and met Jean's father through the Society. She was already a Society member, and at the age of twenty-two, on their Board of Directors. They married and lived on a Rationalist commune at Mentone. Several families lived there, on a ti-tree covered ten-acre property by the sea. Jean was born in 11th of January, 1926. She was the third of the five Langley children



Jean Langley (centre) at the Rationalist Commune at Mentone c.1931

Reflecting on her parents, Jean said, "My father was very English; proper, reserved and formal, and very gentle. The most we got in the way of a hug was a pat on the head. I liked him immensely. My mother was very gentle and kind. She wasn't the greatest housekeeper in the world, but would read at least a dozen books a week. She was well-educated and proofread all of my father's writings. On many nights they'd be in the study for hours, going through whatever he was working on. She wrote poems and stories herself. She was a literary lady of that passionate left-wing world which followed the Depression". Recalling her life on the commune, she said, "Our home was full of Rationalists and very interesting people; the conversation and discussions were vital and marvellously passionate. I may not have understood much of it, but I loved the atmosphere. Mentone wasn't that far from town and people would drive down from the city. Being a celebrant, my father married many rationalists in our house. It was a jolly place as much as anything else; serious and jolly. As our family grew, and by the time my parents had the five of us, we needed somewhere bigger to live, so they rented another place in Mentone. My parents never owned a house in their lives, because they didn't believe in it. They were Socialists. Everything was on principle. They never owned or drove a car. As children, we girls weren't given dolls or other 'girly' things, and the boys weren't allowed to have guns or war-like toys. We were just given books and more books. While my mother was a feminist and a communist, my father was not a communist, though perhaps a little 'pink'. He believed in changing the world through education". Jean loved her childhood. She said, "I spent all the time at the beach...We were dreamy little kids...as free as seagulls. I ran wild on the beach. I was popular because I was so much a madcap, and a witty and sharp little thing. How could they not like me? There was little control over us. We were given an extraordinary amount of freedom, which was wonderful. My parents believed in responsibility; I was responsible for my two younger siblings, and so on. We were taught that we had a responsibility to neighbours and society, and to ideals. The only thing we had to abide by was the truth. My father believed that children should be taught to be civilized. The Society"s principle was that one should not live with the threat of Hell and the promise of Heaven, but to do good because good is good to do. That was the sort of principle that guided their lives and our".


The Langley family, from the right, John, Jean, Elizabeth, Vera, Bob and Margaret at Mentone c.1932


Jean began her schooling at Mentone State School. She recalled, "At School there were these five children with a mad English father who lectured every Sunday night saying, 'Why believe in God?' and this sort of thing, and a mother who strode around with superior airs, and a cigarette in her hand. It made the ordinary state school kids look upon us as if we came from another planet". Jean progressed to Mordialloc High School. Remembering school, she said, "I wasn't a good student, and I didn't get any certificates of any sort, much like it had been at primary school. There were pranks, like hiding underneath the school, and going down the creek in a broken-down boat and nearly drowning. There were endless adventures; it was a continuation of the madcap spirit, but I was always interested in art. From the moment I can remember, I was drawing and planning on becoming an artist. It was my whole dream; a dream which was very foreign to my parent".. Jean left school in the early days of the War and worked as a telephonist. Wanting to be an artist, she applied for a position at Manton's department store in Bourke Street in their advertising department. They trained artists to be commercial artists. Jean took in some of her drawings and they accepted her. Jean said, "At Mantons, I trained in fashion drawing, but I didn't like it much. I got bored sitting at a desk...I talked my way into the display department. We made all the prop ourselves. We'd do drawings for the window displays, and that sort of thing. It might take a month to make a window display. I loved it". Jean was at Manton's for about two years. She lived in bungalows and rooms in inner-city Melbourne in places like St. Kilda and Prahran, saying, "We all lived like that. Melbourne was...full of people living around the city, which is very different to today"


Jean and Bob Langley at Mentone beach c.1948

It was while Jean was at Manton's that she got, as she said, very carried away with the idea of being a serious artist. "I was getting a broader feeling about art and people in the art world. Cinders Coffee Lounge was a meeting place.
"
Sourced and extract taken from >


Sent from my SM-A305YN using Tapatalk
I think you'll find the Rationalists organisation was on the suspect list for bing a CPA affiliate, ASIO records should have it.
 

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Team Captain
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I think you'll find the Rationalists organisation was on the suspect list for bing a CPA affiliate, ASIO records should have it.
Vera Langley (nee Savige), the "mother" mentioned in the documentary, had been on the radar of Australian Security Services since 1918.

Title

Langley, V.S. - Melbourne - formerly in W.A. - Revolutionary

Contents date range

1918 - 1918

Series number

B741
Click to see which government agency or person created this item.

Control symbol

V/82

Citation

NAA: B741, V/82

Item ID

393339

Location

Melbourne

Access status

Open

Date of decision

30 May 1989

Physical format

PAPER FILES AND DOCUMENTS (allocated at series level)

Alternative series and control symbol

MP707/1, V/82

Date registered

28 Oct 1992


The Rationalist Society itself has a number of ASIO files. Here is one of two of the Victorian branch files

Title

Rationalist Society, Victoria

Contents date range

1955 - 1961

Series number

A6122
Click to see which government agency or person created this item.

Control symbol

1332

Citation

NAA: A6122, 1332

Item ID

976330

Location

Canberra

Access status

Open with exception

Reason for restriction

33(1)(a)
33(1)(d)
33(1)(e)(i)
33(1)(g)

Date of decision

07 Feb 2001

Physical format

PAPER FILES AND DOCUMENTS (allocated at series level)

Item notes

REFERENCE COPY ONLY AVAILABLE - ORDER AS A6122/39, ITEM 1332

Visibility and availability indicators

41. Withdrawn permanently

Extent

164 ff

Date registered

13 May 1993

It got so large, that ASIO had to close it and start a second volume

Title

Rationalist Society, Victoria

Contents date range

1955 - 1961

Series number

A6122
Click to see which government agency or person created this item.

Control symbol

1332

Citation

NAA: A6122, 1332

Item ID

21519301

Location

Canberra

Access status

Open with exception

Reason for restriction

33(1)(a)(d)(g)
33(1)(e)(i)

Date of decision

07 Feb 2001

Physical format

PAPER FILES AND DOCUMENTS (allocated at series level)

Visibility and availability indicators

54. Reference copy

Records authority class number

1011977

Date registered

01 Dec 2016

note, one file covering the period of the Somerton Case is permanently withdrawn. The other two files appear to be heavily redacted. None are digitised

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Team Captain
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Jessica's childhood best friend Margaret Langley's married name is Cohen.

There might be multiple reasons that Jessie Thomson is buried in the Jewish section of the cemetery, but her best friend donating a pre paid plot could be one of them.

It's simple and doesn't require Mrs Thomson to be part of any secretive Jewish underground Nazi hunter assassination squad nor even to of been converted to Judaism.

I think we now have a potentially simple explanation for the enigma of where she was buried.

Sent from my SM-A305YN using Tapatalk
Yes, I'm wondering it too. But if SM was well known to this family, surely that would of got a mention in the documentary, let alone a bunch of witnesses from Mentone identifying him back in 1948.
Anyways, I'll keep looking for Leonard Cohen. I'm sure that he's not likely to be SM, but I like to at least prove that he's not, before anyone else looking at this tree jumps to wild conclusions and start annoying his descendants.

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We seem to have an intersection of a number of families lineages that were to be progenitors of those vicariously involved in the Somerton mystery intersecting for the first time in Fremantle in 1918 / 1919. Then they all follow Langley to the Mentone commune in 1920s. Many of which turn up later in Adelaide during the late 1940s.
We probably need to start at Fremantle and that Commonwealth Investigation Branch file.




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Gordon1552

Senior List
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Vera Langley (nee Savige), the "mother" mentioned in the documentary, had been on the radar of Australian Security Services since 1918.

Title

Langley, V.S. - Melbourne - formerly in W.A. - Revolutionary

Contents date range

1918 - 1918

Series number

B741
Click to see which government agency or person created this item.

Control symbol

V/82

Citation

NAA: B741, V/82

Item ID

393339

Location

Melbourne

Access status

Open

Date of decision

30 May 1989

Physical format

PAPER FILES AND DOCUMENTS (allocated at series level)

Alternative series and control symbol

MP707/1, V/82

Date registered

28 Oct 1992


The Rationalist Society itself has a number of ASIO files. Here is one of two of the Victorian branch files

Title

Rationalist Society, Victoria

Contents date range

1955 - 1961

Series number

A6122
Click to see which government agency or person created this item.

Control symbol

1332

Citation

NAA: A6122, 1332

Item ID

976330

Location

Canberra

Access status

Open with exception

Reason for restriction

33(1)(a)
33(1)(d)
33(1)(e)(i)
33(1)(g)

Date of decision

07 Feb 2001

Physical format

PAPER FILES AND DOCUMENTS (allocated at series level)

Item notes

REFERENCE COPY ONLY AVAILABLE - ORDER AS A6122/39, ITEM 1332

Visibility and availability indicators

41. Withdrawn permanently

Extent

164 ff

Date registered

13 May 1993

It got so large, that ASIO had to close it and start a second volume

Title

Rationalist Society, Victoria

Contents date range

1955 - 1961

Series number

A6122
Click to see which government agency or person created this item.

Control symbol

1332

Citation

NAA: A6122, 1332

Item ID

21519301

Location

Canberra

Access status

Open with exception

Reason for restriction

33(1)(a)(d)(g)
33(1)(e)(i)

Date of decision

07 Feb 2001

Physical format

PAPER FILES AND DOCUMENTS (allocated at series level)

Visibility and availability indicators

54. Reference copy

Records authority class number

1011977

Date registered

01 Dec 2016

note, one file covering the period of the Somerton Case is permanently withdrawn. The other two files appear to be heavily redacted. None are digitised

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Checked the Eureka Youth League names?
 

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Yes, I'm wondering it too. But if SM was well known to this family, surely that would of got a mention in the documentary, let alone a bunch of witnesses from Mentone identifying him back in 1948.
Anyways, I'll keep looking for Leonard Cohen. I'm sure that he's not likely to be SM, but I like to at least prove that he's not, before anyone else looking at this tree jumps to wild conclusions and start annoying his descendants.

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Leonard is alive and well. Remarried and just posted on his Facebook page less than 10 hours ago. I don't think that he's anywhere near the age group for SM, so he's definitely ruled out.

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Redacted

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Here's a response to Jon Sanders that is awaiting moderation on Nick Pelling's website. I've noticed a few changes made by predictive text so I'll edit them here.

What Tim Edhouse said in the film Missing Pieces about his grandmother, Vera Lucy Langley (nee Savge) possibly influencing the young Jessica Harkness into dabbling with communist ideology in Mentone lead me on a bit of a deep dive into the background of these connections. Vera gained a CIB dossier in 1918, at this time she’s in Fremantle a few years before John Samuel Langley who’s soapbox anti religious orations gained the attention of the Rationalist Society which he subsequently joins and builds his commune at Mentone with Vera years later.
Anyhow, I remembered the of the Battle of the Barricades occurred at Fremantle around this time soI looked it up and there it was, a ship that you mentioned "SS Dimboola" connected to HC Reynolds and someone else whom you mentioned had tried to set up a stevedoring company.
So could this idea of communist ideology that Tim suggested actually been before Jessica? Her parents perhaps? So I had searched for and discovered a history of Port uprisings along the East Coast too.
Could Jessica’s mum of been locked up at the time of her birth due to one of these riots, hence the place of her birth not being in Newcastle?

All these deep dives are to look for pictures of progenitor of family’s to find evidence of what looks like the Somerton Man’s ears. Most are to no avail. This recent deep dive was to look for any evidence to sustain theories that Jessica Thomson was playing with communists.

The later now seems to have some probable support, but the former, well it hadn’t until I found Vera’s daughter’s (Tim’s mom, Margaret Cohen) headstone on billion graves.

There was one name on it that I couldn’t fathom as to why at first, Dr Elef Jorgensen.

Anyhow I figured out the connection, but what intrigued me was the notion of whether Jessica Thomson the girl whom was Margaret’s best friend in childhood also was acquainted with the Jorgensens, because after a deep dive into their ancestors I find someone by the name of James Levick, who died in Ryde NSW on 12/11/1883 with the same damn ears right down to the connected lobes and upside down hollows. What are the chances of this being genetic, and what are the chances of the Levick family being an ancestor of SM?

A cursory glance at this might indicate that we’re going to be looking at a hell of a lot of potential descendants, https://eehe.org.uk/?p=25611 however the confluence of time and proximity to knowing Jessica Thomson may narrow down the field.
Although I think the DNA detectives will still get there first.

So here’s a starting point. Madeleine Tudway Jörgensen (Levick) (1900 – 1960).
Does she have a contender for Somerton Man amongst siblings or cousins? Or is this another dead end. A pure coincidence in ears? A spontaneous mutation, or is it a common condition amongst many families?
Is it a recessive condition that only shows up when both parents carry the gene and affect a quarter of their children? We’ll keep looking

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Redacted

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Bruce's theory does coincide with 1 of my earlier thoughts that Somerton Man was picked up and interrogated

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Redacted

Team Captain
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Extract》

THE SHOCK DISCOVERY

It was for days after the completion of the bust that Paul received a telephone call from Professor Cleland. He told Paul that he wanted the head and instructed him to go to the morgue, skin the head, and remove the skull replacing it with a rough model that he could make up. Paul followed the instructions, he went to the morgue, retrieved the body, and had it on the table.
Paul had commenced skinning the head to a point where he had removed the skull cap when a Detective suddenly entered the morgue and told him to immediately stop what he was doing and that the man was going to be buried that day.
Paul stated that what he found when he skinned and opened the skull surprised him. The inside of the skull was pristine, immaculately clean which could only have been achieved by pouring boiling water into the brain cavity.
There was no sign of any biological material whatsoever, it had all been removed. Paul called Cleland and told him what had happened, Cleland was very annoyed; they spoke for a while, and from what Paul told me, they agreed that the tissue had been removed to prevent any detailed examination. Paul was aware that certain drugs left tell-tale traces in the brain and not elsewhere in the body, sodium pentathol, the 'truth' drug, was mentioned.
In closing off this session Paul made specific mention of the way that the skin had been stitched when he went to prepare the skull. In his view, it was a very professional job, someone was practiced in this art.


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Kurve

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Dec 27, 2016
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The Sommerton Man was exhumed on the 19th of May, nearly six weeks ago, I would have thought we would have some sort of update by now!! I'm not expecting any answers this early but maybe just an update saying how things are progressing etc.
This six weeks has really dragged, I hope we get something soon.
 

squawk

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Earlier on the SA news they said a few weeks to a few months for any results. Not sure how optimistic they are being with that estimate but we do have Advance DNA Testing Facilities at Adelaide UNi so maybe it will only take that long.
It must be getting close to the time we hear something more about the results of the testing that was to follow exhumation....
 

BonzaRam

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Jan 21, 2019
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It must be getting close to the time we hear something more about the results of the testing that was to follow exhumation....
" She said it was "difficult to put a timeframe on" how long the forensic processes would take, but that scientists would consider using "as many different DNA techniques as are available". "

 

Kurve

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Dec 27, 2016
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" She said it was "difficult to put a timeframe on" how long the forensic processes would take, but that scientists would consider using "as many different DNA techniques as are available". "

Ancestry and 23andMe only takes between 6 and 8 weeks for a complete result, I'd think they should already have something.
 

Kurve

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Dec 27, 2016
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IF they have been able to find some viable DNA or maybe they are contacting family first?
Would we have heard if they couldn't extract any DNA? Teeth and bones should be good for it but maybe that's what's taking so long. And finding family too, yes. Good thinking.

hah! Maybe they know who it is already and they're in negotiations to make a documentary or something.
 

squawk

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I’d say that once they have done their tests they would be talking with potential family members before announcing anything….but that by now some genuine progress must have been made at least?
 

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