Your "I Don't Get It" Band

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Mofra

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Back on topic:
Fu Manchu are ok but barely 1% of what Kyuss were in the battle of 90s stoner rock heavyweights.
Bon Iver - seen twice at festivals, I swear even some of their fans looked bored during the set
Kid Rock - silver spoon millionaire kid who pretended to be a hick to sell albums.
Limp Bizkit - even as someone who actually listened to some Nu Metal back in the day (SOTD, Mudvayne) I didn't get why they were the popular band
 

PhatBoy

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Them's fighting words!

Sure, releasing both Green River and Willy and the Poor Boys in 1969 is insanely good, but he kept writing quality (albeit less heard) songs for a long time afterwards. How many people realise Status Quo's Rocking all over the World is a Fogerty cover?
I'll argue 'The Old man down the Road' is as good as anything he ever wrote.

Rock and Roll Girls is the best solo Fogerty song for me. Used to get hammered every Saturday on the Aussie Hotel jukebox in my hometown after cricket! I agree the guy is one of the greatest songwriters ever (and probably the only man to ever take a guitar into a courtroom to prove that he hadn’t plagiarised…. Himself). Just saying that his peak body of output was that 3-4 years where credence ruled the radio and he just churned out hit after hit.

And yes I know he wrote rockin all over the world - as much as I love him, can’t beat the Quo version in front of a heaving Wembley!
 

PhatBoy

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Back on topic:
Fu Manchu are ok but barely 1% of what Kyuss were in the battle of 90s stoner rock heavyweights.
Bon Iver - seen twice at festivals, I swear even some of their fans looked bored during the set
Kid Rock - silver spoon millionaire kid who pretended to be a hick to sell albums.
Limp Bizkit - even as someone who actually listened to some Nu Metal back in the day (SOTD, Mudvayne) I didn't get why they were the popular band

The biggest stain on the history of music was Kid Rock’s utterly abortional cover of Sweet Home Alabama - which not only ruined it, but Werewolves of London as well in one four minute festival of excrement
 

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Mofra

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The biggest stain on the history of music was Kid Rock’s utterly abortional cover of Sweet Home Alabama - which not only ruined it, but Werewolves of London as well in one four minute festival of excrement
Bring back capital punishment.

Strange you mention WoL as a few Warren Zevon songs have been popping up on my spotify playlists recently.
Is there a 'Hits that sound nothing like a performer's regular body of work' thread somewhere?
 

MC Bad Genius

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The biggest stain on the history of music was Kid Rock’s utterly abortional cover of Sweet Home Alabama - which not only ruined it, but Werewolves of London as well in one four minute festival of excrement
Every Friday I choose a theme for colleagues to request songs for a playlist we put on at 3pm. I have a standing rule that no Kid Rock songs will be allowed because of one dude that without fail would nominate that cover of Sweet Home Alabama. It's an abomination. Almost as bad as the Disturbed cover of Sound Of Silence...
 

PhatBoy

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Every Friday I choose a theme for colleagues to request songs for a playlist we put on at 3pm. I have a standing rule that no Kid Rock songs will be allowed because of one dude that without fail would nominate that cover of Sweet Home Alabama. It's an abomination. Almost as bad as the Disturbed cover of Sound Of Silence...

F*** me that was overrated.

Wow you sing the song like Eddie Vedder with a mouthful of mashed potato and without the perfect Paul Simon harmony over the top. Groundbreaking.
 

MC Bad Genius

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F*** me that was overrated.

Wow you sing the song like Eddie Vedder with a mouthful of mashed potato and without the perfect Paul Simon harmony over the top. Groundbreaking.
I went on a bit of a rant somewhere else on BigFooty about the song a couple of weeks back that I think you might appreciate. I'll see if I can find it ...
 

MC Bad Genius

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I went on a bit of a rant somewhere else on BigFooty about the song a couple of weeks back that I think you might appreciate. I'll see if I can find it ...
Found it, PhatBoy:

Throughout the history of music there have been precious few covers that have surpassed the original. There's something quintessential when the writer of the song also sings it; the raw humanity of someone truly inhabiting the lyrics like no other person can. Of course, there are some notable exceptions like Jimi Hendrix taking on Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower" or Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt" being reimagined by Johnny Cash, where the performance somehow transcends the divide between writer and performer.

Disturbed's cover of "The Sound Of Silence" is no such exception.

Put aside for now the fact that the version of the song we all know and love was actually somewhat of a cover itself*, The Disturbed version is the audio equivalent of this painting "restoration":

1636258539535.png


You can vaguely see what they were trying to do and there is some resemblance to the original, but it's a tragic example of the Dunning-Kruger effect.

But let's delve a little bit deeper into what makes this cover such an abomination:
  • Does it replace an instrument with a piano to instantly emotionally manipulate a sense of seriousness? Check.
  • Is the song slightly slower with breathier vocals to match the cliched template of every trailer for an upcoming shitty TV show**? Check.
  • Does it have an unnecessary string section? Check.
  • Does the vocal melody change just enough to make stupid people think they've actually made the song "their" song? Check.
  • Is there symphonic percussion instead of standard drums to bring the pomposity up to nauseating levels? Check.
  • Does it build to an cathartic release that is completely at odds with the original? Check.
  • Do you hear the singer push his voice to the limit in a completely transparent attempt at making him seem sincere? Check.
The original song has been saved by the US Library Of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important", a fate that will only be mirrored by the Disturbed version if every physical copy of it ever produced were to be piled together, set on fire and launched out of Earth's orbit; a recording of the world's collective sigh of relief would probably meet that same bar of being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important".

I could fart a tune that had more emotional sincerity and less self-important grandeur than anything David Draiman produces in this crime against humanity. I would prefer to listen to Crazy Frog dragging his green, webbed fingernails down a chalkboard than ever torment myself to listen to that atrocious worship of banality ever again.

To be completely honest, I'm more disgusted than words can describe that hundreds of millions of people have willingly put themselves through the aural molestation that this song truly is. I feel sick. You make me sick. Humanity makes me sick. But I'd rather throw up all over the floor, lick it clean, then vomit again in a continuous Sisyphean eternity if it meant erasing this pathetic excuse for musical reappropration from existence.

* It was originally released as a very simple folk song and didn't make any real impact at all. Then, without either Simon or Garfunkel's knowledge or approval, the producer Tom Wilson remixed the song, adding electric guitar and drums to it for the record label to release, to massive worldwide success.
** Seriously, enough is enough.
 

PhatBoy

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Found it, PhatBoy:

Throughout the history of music there have been precious few covers that have surpassed the original. There's something quintessential when the writer of the song also sings it; the raw humanity of someone truly inhabiting the lyrics like no other person can. Of course, there are some notable exceptions like Jimi Hendrix taking on Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower" or Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt" being reimagined by Johnny Cash, where the performance somehow transcends the divide between writer and performer.

Disturbed's cover of "The Sound Of Silence" is no such exception.

Put aside for now the fact that the version of the song we all know and love was actually somewhat of a cover itself*, The Disturbed version is the audio equivalent of this painting "restoration":

View attachment 1282155

You can vaguely see what they were trying to do and there is some resemblance to the original, but it's a tragic example of the Dunning-Kruger effect.

But let's delve a little bit deeper into what makes this cover such an abomination:
  • Does it replace an instrument with a piano to instantly emotionally manipulate a sense of seriousness? Check.
  • Is the song slightly slower with breathier vocals to match the cliched template of every trailer for an upcoming shitty TV show**? Check.
  • Does it have an unnecessary string section? Check.
  • Does the vocal melody change just enough to make stupid people think they've actually made the song "their" song? Check.
  • Is there symphonic percussion instead of standard drums to bring the pomposity up to nauseating levels? Check.
  • Does it build to an cathartic release that is completely at odds with the original? Check.
  • Do you hear the singer push his voice to the limit in a completely transparent attempt at making him seem sincere? Check.
The original song has been saved by the US Library Of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important", a fate that will only be mirrored by the Disturbed version if every physical copy of it ever produced were to be piled together, set on fire and launched out of Earth's orbit; a recording of the world's collective sigh of relief would probably meet that same bar of being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important".

I could fart a tune that had more emotional sincerity and less self-important grandeur than anything David Draiman produces in this crime against humanity. I would prefer to listen to Crazy Frog dragging his green, webbed fingernails down a chalkboard than ever torment myself to listen to that atrocious worship of banality ever again.

To be completely honest, I'm more disgusted than words can describe that hundreds of millions of people have willingly put themselves through the aural molestation that this song truly is. I feel sick. You make me sick. Humanity makes me sick. But I'd rather throw up all over the floor, lick it clean, then vomit again in a continuous Sisyphean eternity if it meant erasing this pathetic excuse for musical reappropration from existence.

* It was originally released as a very simple folk song and didn't make any real impact at all. Then, without either Simon or Garfunkel's knowledge or approval, the producer Tom Wilson remixed the song, adding electric guitar and drums to it for the record label to release, to massive worldwide success.
** Seriously, enough is enough.

Bra.
Vo.

To paraphrase Lionel hutz, I don’t use the word ‘hero’ often, but you sir, are the greatest hero of them all.
 

La Dispute

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Found it, PhatBoy:

Throughout the history of music there have been precious few covers that have surpassed the original. There's something quintessential when the writer of the song also sings it; the raw humanity of someone truly inhabiting the lyrics like no other person can. Of course, there are some notable exceptions like Jimi Hendrix taking on Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower" or Nine Inch Nails' "Hurt" being reimagined by Johnny Cash, where the performance somehow transcends the divide between writer and performer.

Disturbed's cover of "The Sound Of Silence" is no such exception.

Put aside for now the fact that the version of the song we all know and love was actually somewhat of a cover itself*, The Disturbed version is the audio equivalent of this painting "restoration":

View attachment 1282155

You can vaguely see what they were trying to do and there is some resemblance to the original, but it's a tragic example of the Dunning-Kruger effect.

But let's delve a little bit deeper into what makes this cover such an abomination:
  • Does it replace an instrument with a piano to instantly emotionally manipulate a sense of seriousness? Check.
  • Is the song slightly slower with breathier vocals to match the cliched template of every trailer for an upcoming shitty TV show**? Check.
  • Does it have an unnecessary string section? Check.
  • Does the vocal melody change just enough to make stupid people think they've actually made the song "their" song? Check.
  • Is there symphonic percussion instead of standard drums to bring the pomposity up to nauseating levels? Check.
  • Does it build to an cathartic release that is completely at odds with the original? Check.
  • Do you hear the singer push his voice to the limit in a completely transparent attempt at making him seem sincere? Check.
The original song has been saved by the US Library Of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important", a fate that will only be mirrored by the Disturbed version if every physical copy of it ever produced were to be piled together, set on fire and launched out of Earth's orbit; a recording of the world's collective sigh of relief would probably meet that same bar of being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important".

I could fart a tune that had more emotional sincerity and less self-important grandeur than anything David Draiman produces in this crime against humanity. I would prefer to listen to Crazy Frog dragging his green, webbed fingernails down a chalkboard than ever torment myself to listen to that atrocious worship of banality ever again.

To be completely honest, I'm more disgusted than words can describe that hundreds of millions of people have willingly put themselves through the aural molestation that this song truly is. I feel sick. You make me sick. Humanity makes me sick. But I'd rather throw up all over the floor, lick it clean, then vomit again in a continuous Sisyphean eternity if it meant erasing this pathetic excuse for musical reappropration from existence.

* It was originally released as a very simple folk song and didn't make any real impact at all. Then, without either Simon or Garfunkel's knowledge or approval, the producer Tom Wilson remixed the song, adding electric guitar and drums to it for the record label to release, to massive worldwide success.
** Seriously, enough is enough.
Nailed it. Glad there others who see through that genuine atrocity.

Can comfortably chuck Disturbed in the ‘bands you don’t get’ pile.
 

La Dispute

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Back on topic:
Fu Manchu are ok but barely 1% of what Kyuss were in the battle of 90s stoner rock heavyweights.
Bon Iver - seen twice at festivals, I swear even some of their fans looked bored during the set
Kid Rock - silver spoon millionaire kid who pretended to be a hick to sell albums.
Limp Bizkit - even as someone who actually listened to some Nu Metal back in the day (SOTD, Mudvayne) I didn't get why they were the popular band
Fu Manchu are blatantly ripped off by a lot of bands in that scene. The ending of Knights of Cydonia by Muse is basically a re-work of one of their riffs too. Didn’t realise there was an ongoing battle with Kyuss, who are comfortably the better band, but they go OK.

I can see why others don’t like Bon Iver, but For Emma is still a classic indie folk album. Wouldn’t go out of my way to see him at a festival unless it was seated though - some bands just don’t fit that kind of experience. Unless Neil Young or Bob Dylan is playing acoustically there’s just not a whole lot of impact.

I think his last couple of albums were pretty good on the whole and unearthed some decent standalone songs. Always found the ST a little underwhelming and basically trying to copy what Grizzly Bear were doing at the time.

Didn’t get into Limp Bizkit, but was probably too young when they were at their peak, but their singles are still strangely enjoyable to listen to. Used to really like Boiler.
 

Mofra

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I can see why others don’t like Bon Iver, but For Emma is still a classic indie folk album. Wouldn’t go out of my way to see him at a festival unless it was seated though - some bands just don’t fit that kind of experience. Unless Neil Young or Bob Dylan is playing acoustically there’s just not a whole lot of impact.
I have seen a few acoustic sets at festivals that work well (e.g. Neil Finn at Meredith) and some 'single stage' festivals mean you either listen to the band or hang out at camp. Just doesn't do it for me or for a lot of people.
 

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PhatBoy

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I don’t know if I mentioned it earlier in the thread but I don’t get Eskimo Joe. Their melodies and phrasing don’t mesh for me and they don’t really have much to say IMO.

I had this discussion with my girl recently - she is a silverchair and daniel johns devotee and while I liked Freakshow, Frogstomp, and bits of Diorama I can say honestly I don’t get Neon Ballroom or Young Modern and heaps of his more abstract stuff.

Anyway she was asking me why I like what I like.

I said this and now that I think about it, it’s as well as I’ve ever put it:

Bands and musicians I like have to have at least two the following….

- great musical skills
- a knack for writing a catchy melody, that as a musician myself and not a wank musician who likes discordant, odd-time-signature crap, has to make musical sense
- something real to say in their songs
- or be open about NOT trying to say anything (think fun punk bands like Frenzal)
- a real attitude not one dictated to by the people writing songs for them and the record label promoting them
- Genuine humour
- engaging context and subject matter
- not be making music just to make money, OR if you are, being open about it.


To me a band like, for example, Bon Jovi: they have catchy melodies. That’s it. To me they aren’t trying to say anything, they are trying to LOOK like they’re saying something but seriously, 50 year olds singing ‘this is our house?’ You’re not saying anything. You’re not amazing musicians - you’re decent but not amazing. You’re not funny. You take yourselves too seriously. Your subject matter is not weighty. You’re not writing a definitive love song - it’s just regurgitated cliche after cliche. You don’t have attitude.

Hence I don’t like Bon Jovi
 

La Dispute

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The worst thing Eskimo Joe ever did was that cringey cash grab track after Heath Ledger died.

5BA23B21-531B-42B3-97B3-AD843EE86A05.jpeg


(Because they were in the same spot, just a little town called New York City, they were deeply affected by his passing)
 

PhatBoy

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The worst thing Eskimo Joe ever did was that cringey cash grab track after Heath Ledger died.

View attachment 1282765

(Because they were in the same spot, just a little town called New York City, they were deeply affected by his passing)

Oh FFS.

See I don’t have a problem with artists using people they’ve never met as inspiration or whatever. But that’s pretty blatant.

I know they have their critics but U2’s Stuck In A Moment would have been three times as big a hit if they had have said when it was released that it was an imagined argument between Bono and Michael Hutchence.

Instead it came out 10 years on
 

mr bagcroft

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I can’t get a gauge on who John Mayer’s fan base is?

He was pretty popular when I was a kid, but I couldn’t imagine anyone under 20 being a serious fan. His music isn’t super poppy but he’s got some reasonably big pop hits. Plays a pretty watered down version of traditional blues.

I don’t mind a lot of his stuff, it’s a little bland though.
Soccer mums and blues guitar snobs.
Thats it.
In total.
 

MC Bad Genius

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So god damn bland.
awful.
I feel like I need to start a new thread: Your "I Don't Get The Hate" Band.

I'd have Muse at the top of my list. I'm by no means a fan, but I tend to enjoy their music when I hear it and I really don't understand the vitriol that gets thrown at them at all.
 

PhatBoy

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Soccer mums and blues guitar snobs.
Thats it.
In total.

I hate admitting this but I’m starting to not mind him after a long time of despising him.

My on again off again girlfriend adores him and so on our home date nights - basically spending the evening taking turns picking YouTube songs - I get exposed to heaps of John Mayer. Some of it is shameless guff that is just an N-Sync ‘I want to get laid’ dumpster fire that only a 25 year old girl would like.

But he IS a very very good guitarist and has a hidden knack for taking the piss out of himself. Some of his melodies I don’t get but others are very well written. I can tolerate him
 

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