Solved Peter Sutcliffe - The Yorkshire Ripper is dead

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Kurve

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Dec 27, 2016
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The Yorkshire Ripper has died after testing positive for Covid-19. Responsible for changing the way serious crimes are investigated in the UK with the creation of the first information matching software, HOLMES. HOLMES was later used by MACRO in the investigation of the Claremont serial killing murders and the abduction murder of Gerard Ross, which incidentally didn't ping anybody ... apparently.

Sutcliffe was serving a life sentence after being convicted of murdering 13 women, including a 16-year-old shop assistant, in northern England between 1975 and 1980.

His youngest victim, just 14 when Sutcliffe hit her five times in the head with a hammer in 1975, survived the attack.

His murders — which left women mutilated across northern England — triggered widespread fear in northern cities and the police were criticised for taking so long to track him down.

Sutcliffe was arrested in 1981 and pleaded guilty to 13 charges of murder and 7 charges of attempted murder.

The women he killed were Marguerite Walls, Yvonne Pearson, Jayne MacDonald, Josephine Whitaker, Wilma McCann, Patricia Atkinson, Helen Rytka, Jacqueline Hill, Irene Richardson, Vera Millward, Barbara Leach, Jean Jordan and Emily Jackson.

sutcliffe.png



During his trial, even Sutcliffe expressed surprise that he was able to carry on for so long.

 

BFew

Norm Smith Medallist
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During his trial, even Sutcliffe expressed surprise that he was able to carry on for so long.
The below article today, implies that West Yorkshire Police made more of an effort to capture Sutcliffe when his victims were not sex workers.


'Media coverage and public outrage was coloured by the notion Sutcliffe’s murder victims who were sex workers were more to blame than those who were not - with campaigners arguing the police’s disregard for sex workers' lives effectively enabled Sutcliffe to continue with his murder spree.'

'During Sutcliffe's trial, Sir Michael Havers, the prosecutor who was attorney general at the time, said: "Some were prostitutes but perhaps the saddest part of the case is that some were not."'
 

BFew

Norm Smith Medallist
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Some rather disturbing allegations and facts of connections between Jimmy Savile and Peter Sutcliffe
Along with revelations that Saville was investigated by Police as a suspect in the Yorkshire Ripper murders, after an anonymous tip off to Police.


 

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Kurve

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Some rather disturbing allegations and facts of connections between Jimmy Savile and Peter Sutcliffe
Along with revelations that Saville was investigated by Police as a suspect in the Yorkshire Ripper murders, after an anonymous tip off to Police.


Savile apparently had a set of keys to access all of Broadmoor where Sutcliffe was. I don't think there's any reason to disbelieve that given it's acknowledged he had keys and his own sleeping quarters in other hospitals and mental health facilities.

A disgusting man and proof how stupid people can be in failing to see what is right in front of their eyes. Or willing to look away.
 

GreyCrow

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Responsible for changing the way serious crimes are investigated in the UK with the creation of the first information matching software, HOLMES. HOLMES was later used by MACRO in the investigation of the Claremont serial killing murders and the abduction murder of Gerard Ross, which incidentally didn't ping anybody ... apparently.
Wiki - maybe WAPOL need a Byford Report
West Yorkshire Police were criticised for their failure to catch Sutcliffe despite having interviewed him nine times in the course of their five-year investigation. Because of the sensational nature of the case, the police handled an exceptional amount of information, some of it misleading (including the Wearside Jack hoax recorded message and letters purporting to be from the "Ripper"). Following Sutcliffe's conviction, the government ordered a review of the investigation, conducted by Lawrence Byford, known as the "Byford Report". The findings were made fully public in 2006 and confirmed the validity of the criticism against the force. The report led to changes to investigative procedures which were adopted across UK police forces.[4] In 2019, The Guardian described the manhunt as "stunningly mishandled".[5]
 

BFew

Norm Smith Medallist
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BFew

Norm Smith Medallist
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Here's links to the report or parts of it that were released as part of a FOI request
And here's an unofficial link to the Byford and Sampson reports and a whole lot of summarising of what was in them and some other useful links to Government reports on the case




 

BFew

Norm Smith Medallist
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I wonder who might have had the motivation to send false letters and tapes to West Yorkshire Police pretending to be Jack the Ripper, that were claimed to have derailed investigations, and partly caused Sutcliffe to avoid being arrested for so long?

Apparently John Samuel Humble in a very long wiki page with lots of info on the case too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wearside_Jack
'Wearside Jack is the nickname given to John Samuel Humble (8 January 1956 – 30 July 2019), an Englishman who pretended to be the Yorkshire Ripper in a hoax audio recording and several letters in the period 1978–1979'

'Humble was motivated, according to Gregg after Humble's conviction, by a wish for notoriety, a hatred of the police and a fixation with the Jack the Ripper Whitechapel murders in late-19th century London. The contempt for the police dated back to 1975 when he was imprisoned for assaulting an off-duty police officer (for which he served three months in a young offenders institution), and an earlier conviction for burglary and theft in 1973. Humble's preoccupation with the Whitechapel murders influenced the writing of the hoax letters, some passages being paraphrased from the 19th century letters of the earlier serial killer'

'Humble was released in 2009 after serving four years of his sentence. Humble was given a new identity as John Samuel Anderson'
 

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