Discussion Question and Answer Thread

TheLoungeLizard

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Oct 21, 2010
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Yeh, not an AFL response that i would assume?

I know the reasons for it, im actually curious if the AFL came out and said "it is done because X" in anything official.
Let me elaborate a bit better now I have time.

I believe Mero has said before that the first 2 seasons the replicas sold out like hot cakes, but after that the sales fell dramatically (a mixture of the novelty worn off and clubs running into the era of their current jumper. Richmonds last one was our home with a fake stitching print and other clubs made up jumpers mixing old ones together) so it lost its heritage appeal (Richmond also made up jumpers) and then the manufacturers sort of asked it to end as they were losing money making up replicas that didn't sell and then the AFL lost interest (stopped the umpire heritage kits, the heritage logo) so I think it came down to manufacturers and clubs saying it had run its race
 

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
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I played Ammos in the 80s
Reading about the whole power prison bar thing made me think.

Whatever happened to heritage round? Do we know why it got scrapped? As in did the afl ever actually give a reason in a press release or anything?
Heritage Round was expected to provide another source of revenue for clubs as they would have a traditional design for supporters to purchase.
Expectations were based on the Rugby League success that was enjoyed with old school designs with old school sponsors on an old school template.
Think baggy rugby league jerseys of the 1980s.
The problem, however, the 1980s designs were not all that different from the current design, and the older designs had no hold on the public.
Before the 1970s footy jumpers were not readily available to the public. There was no AFL Store or Rebel Sport with rows of them for sale.
Mostly you had to get your Nana to knit one. So the sentiment around getting a jumper 'just like you had in the 1980s as a kid' was not there.
So designs from this era are generally regarded as the 'traditional designs'. Footscray going back to their 1935 jumper, or Carlton going back to their 1890s canvas lace-up design has no hold over the current fan base. Other clubs wore basically the same; Essendon a thinner sash, Geelong printed laces on thinner hoops and Collingwood Black & White stripes.
Clubs were encouraged to purchase large numbers of the jumpers, expecting the sort of success 1989 South Sydney jerseys were getting with Smiths Crisps sponsorship on them.
Sales were poor, and several clubs who had bought in large numbers of jumpers found they could not sell half of what they ordered, meaning that in fact they lost money on the Heritage Round. The Wholesale price being half of the Retail price, they were buying them for $50 from the apparel sponsor, selling them for $100. If they ordered 100, they spend $5k. They needed to sell 50 of them at $100 to break even.
Eventually they found AFLauctions.com.au could sell game worn jumpers online and the club could guarantee they would make money, since they don't pay for game worn jumpers, it's part of the apparel sponsorship for the manufacturer to provide a certain number of player issue jumpers each season.
One-off promotional jumpers are now more successful as the money made out of them is mostly determined by whether the team wins on that day.
Plus, they can do whatever they like to them to make them different from the Home jumper, for the collectors who want something different.
With the Heritage designs, they're stuck with what appears here: http://footyjumpers.com/clubs.htm
 

phantom13

Moderator
Sep 12, 2007
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Heritage Round was expected to provide another source of revenue for clubs as they would have a traditional design for supporters to purchase.
Expectations were based on the Rugby League success that was enjoyed with old school designs with old school sponsors on an old school template.
Think baggy rugby league jerseys of the 1980s.
The problem, however, the 1980s designs were not all that different from the current design, and the older designs had no hold on the public.
Before the 1970s footy jumpers were not readily available to the public. There was no AFL Store or Rebel Sport with rows of them for sale.
Mostly you had to get your Nana to knit one. So the sentiment around getting a jumper 'just like you had in the 1980s as a kid' was not there.
So designs from this era are generally regarded as the 'traditional designs'. Footscray going back to their 1935 jumper, or Carlton going back to their 1890s canvas lace-up design has no hold over the current fan base. Other clubs wore basically the same; Essendon a thinner sash, Geelong printed laces on thinner hoops and Collingwood Black & White stripes.
Clubs were encouraged to purchase large numbers of the jumpers, expecting the sort of success 1989 South Sydney jerseys were getting with Smiths Crisps sponsorship on them.
Sales were poor, and several clubs who had bought in large numbers of jumpers found they could not sell half of what they ordered, meaning that in fact they lost money on the Heritage Round. The Wholesale price being half of the Retail price, they were buying them for $50 from the apparel sponsor, selling them for $100. If they ordered 100, they spend $5k. They needed to sell 50 of them at $100 to break even.
Eventually they found AFLauctions.com.au could sell game worn jumpers online and the club could guarantee they would make money, since they don't pay for game worn jumpers, it's part of the apparel sponsorship for the manufacturer to provide a certain number of player issue jumpers each season.
One-off promotional jumpers are now more successful as the money made out of them is mostly determined by whether the team wins on that day.
Plus, they can do whatever they like to them to make them different from the Home jumper, for the collectors who want something different.
With the Heritage designs, they're stuck with what appears here: http://footyjumpers.com/clubs.htm
Appreciate the response, again, was this a statement from the afl? Was there a statement from the afl or did it just stop being in the fixture?
 

offtherails9

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May 30, 2012
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I feel like there would be a better way to do it in 2020. Even if it's buying guernseys to order etc., and picking designs that they know will sell. You only have to look at the eBay markets for heritage guernseys to know that they're in demand.
 

Prison bar Pete

Premium Platinum
Dec 20, 2015
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Port Adelaide Magpies!
I'd love for Port to do each of their past guernseys so I could buy one of each (no need to do the Collingwood one we wore for a bit though!). When they were been done in the past heritage games I couldn't justify the expense, but now one a year would be good. I'd particularly like to see the ones that haven't been done yet used on the footy field in heritage matches.
 

Power Of Optimism

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Jul 27, 2012
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1620627694766.png

1620627716514.png

1620627755058.png


1620627984315.png


The above images from 1950/1 Argus and 1950 Weekend Magazine seem to indicate Geelong wearing, perhaps, a lighter blue than we're used to seeing today. I suspect this is primarily artistic license, although I wouldn't rule out printing limitations or a simple fade of colour over a period of time.

Would anyone here be able to clarify? SJ Mero Have the Cats ever worn a non-navy blue?

In pretty much every other source, it appears as though a darker, navier blue is true. For example, in these badges from the same year it appears as though Geelong's badge is navy (and their fellow navy/white comrades Carlton are the penguins - bring that back!). The cover of the Sporting Life July 1950 is also clearly navy.

1620627730263.png


1620627938619.png


And this 1951 VFL Grand Final video clearly indicates navy. At 4:25 players run out of race - close-up and highest definition of their jumpers - and the navy hoops are indistinguishable from the black shorts.



Again, I highly suspect it's just artistic license but I'm curious if anyone knows more.
 

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,003
11,059
Vancouver, Canada
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I played Ammos in the 80s
View attachment 1123621
View attachment 1123623
View attachment 1123625

View attachment 1123627

The above images from 1950/1 Argus and 1950 Weekend Magazine seem to indicate Geelong wearing, perhaps, a lighter blue than we're used to seeing today. I suspect this is primarily artistic license, although I wouldn't rule out printing limitations or a simple fade of colour over a period of time.

Would anyone here be able to clarify? SJ Mero Have the Cats ever worn a non-navy blue?

In pretty much every other source, it appears as though a darker, navier blue is true. For example, in these badges from the same year it appears as though Geelong's badge is navy (and their fellow navy/white comrades Carlton are the penguins - bring that back!). The cover of the Sporting Life July 1950 is also clearly navy.

View attachment 1123624

View attachment 1123626

And this 1951 VFL Grand Final video clearly indicates navy. At 4:25 players run out of race - close-up and highest definition of their jumpers - and the navy hoops are indistinguishable from the black shorts.



Again, I highly suspect it's just artistic license but I'm curious if anyone knows more.
Hand Colouring of Black & White photos was an art form we are no longer used to in this era.
As you'll see from the Weekend Magazine pic, the crowd are in B&W. Only the players, umpire and the turf are painted in.
Those artists were not necessarily football followers.
They would have been told what colours the uniforms were, and then painted them with the inks & paints they had available.
This image was then photographed, and converted into Cyan, Magenta, Yellow and Black dots, which then make up the image.
To highlight the difference between Black & Blue, the artists chose a lighter shade of Blue, however this was never the same as what Geelong wore in their jumpers (or socks)
 

neogh

Rookie
Apr 17, 2015
26
39
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Heritage Round was expected to provide another source of revenue for clubs as they would have a traditional design for supporters to purchase.
Expectations were based on the Rugby League success that was enjoyed with old school designs with old school sponsors on an old school template.
Think baggy rugby league jerseys of the 1980s.
The problem, however, the 1980s designs were not all that different from the current design, and the older designs had no hold on the public.
Before the 1970s footy jumpers were not readily available to the public. There was no AFL Store or Rebel Sport with rows of them for sale.
Mostly you had to get your Nana to knit one. So the sentiment around getting a jumper 'just like you had in the 1980s as a kid' was not there.
So designs from this era are generally regarded as the 'traditional designs'. Footscray going back to their 1935 jumper, or Carlton going back to their 1890s canvas lace-up design has no hold over the current fan base. Other clubs wore basically the same; Essendon a thinner sash, Geelong printed laces on thinner hoops and Collingwood Black & White stripes.
Clubs were encouraged to purchase large numbers of the jumpers, expecting the sort of success 1989 South Sydney jerseys were getting with Smiths Crisps sponsorship on them.
Sales were poor, and several clubs who had bought in large numbers of jumpers found they could not sell half of what they ordered, meaning that in fact they lost money on the Heritage Round. The Wholesale price being half of the Retail price, they were buying them for $50 from the apparel sponsor, selling them for $100. If they ordered 100, they spend $5k. They needed to sell 50 of them at $100 to break even.
Eventually they found AFLauctions.com.au could sell game worn jumpers online and the club could guarantee they would make money, since they don't pay for game worn jumpers, it's part of the apparel sponsorship for the manufacturer to provide a certain number of player issue jumpers each season.
One-off promotional jumpers are now more successful as the money made out of them is mostly determined by whether the team wins on that day.
Plus, they can do whatever they like to them to make them different from the Home jumper, for the collectors who want something different.
With the Heritage designs, they're stuck with what appears here: http://footyjumpers.com/clubs.htm
I can see why and think I heard about the lack of profits from Heritage Round.

But I still have 2 questions.

One is why are those retro jumpers (usually the collared ones) classified as one-off jumpers and whether they are really different from the Heritage jumpers

and Two is why can't the AFL come up with a more family-friendly round that carries most of the elements of Heritage Round that dedicates for the older audiences? A Historical Round that tries to connect kids and adults to each of their era of footy.
 

Mero

Norm Smith Medallist
Jul 9, 2003
9,003
11,059
Vancouver, Canada
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
I played Ammos in the 80s
I can see why and think I heard about the lack of profits from Heritage Round.

But I still have 2 questions.

One is why are those retro jumpers (usually the collared ones) classified as one-off jumpers and whether they are really different from the Heritage jumpers

and Two is why can't the AFL come up with a more family-friendly round that carries most of the elements of Heritage Round that dedicates for the older audiences? A Historical Round that tries to connect kids and adults to each of their era of footy.
Heritage Round was an organised event each year.
It began in 2003 and was supposed to continue in 2008, however, clubs told the AFL they were not interested in developing jumpers for it.
A few clubs had Heritage jumpers already made in 2008, and so they are listed as Heritage.
(Jumpers are approved the season prior to their use)
Geelong and Melbourne went ahead with using their against each other in 2008 in what would have been Heritage Round, then called Tom Wills Round.
The logo would have looked like this each year
View attachment 1125044
I guess I've let a few slide in there as well where they're technically one off, but the intent was to celebrate the Heritage of the club
 
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