Stop complaining about sloggers | BigFooty

Stop complaining about sloggers

Discussion in 'Cricket' started by ShriekingShack, Dec 2, 2018.

  1. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    I see so many people on this board complaining that the Australian team is full of sloggers and that the only way to craft a test match innings is through a slow but steady approach.

    Boy do I have news for you. You are wrong. Oh so very wrong.

    Some of the greatest batsmen of all time have been "sloggers" and make many on here look foolish when they whinge our batsmen are too impatient or are sloggers. Let me teach you a little bit of cricket.

    Adam Gilchrist: Belted the ball rain hail or shine. One of the greatest batsmen in our history

    Michael Bevan: Incredible finisher. One of the great batsmen who gave it a whack.

    Sehwag: The Indian Gilchrist, but not as good. Again, scored at a ridiculous rate.

    David Warner: Aggressive batsman with a very impressive record. Another slogger.

    Chris Gayle: Destructive batsman who blasted a triple century. One of the greatest innings of all time.

    Mark Boucher: The South African Gilchrist

    Some of the greatest batsmen of all time were sloggers. The proof is above.

    Now shut up and please stop whining about it. It is not an issue and never has been.
     
    Bomberboyokay likes this.

    (Log in to remove this ad.)

  2. Carbine Chaos

    Carbine Chaos Jubilant Masto

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Apr 09
    Posts:
    45,722
    Other Teams:
    Everton, Delhi, Perth
    Disagree. Gilchrist had a wonderful technique. His 'slogging' was just an extension of that. I'm assuming you are referring to the limited overs sides - I wouldn't put the likes of Maxwell, Lynn etc. in that same category of technique. When Maxwell does bat in that ilk he's very good. It doesn't happen often, though. Big difference between Gilly, Sehwag etc. and mindless sloggers.

    The main complaint is about team composition too, so you've completely missed the point. Sloggers can work in a side when paired with accumulators and more traditional batsmen. The ratio is clearly off in the current side.
     
  3. Carbine Chaos

    Carbine Chaos Jubilant Masto

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Apr 09
    Posts:
    45,722
    Other Teams:
    Everton, Delhi, Perth
    Apologies, only realised it was a troll post here.
     
  4. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    Why? He was a very handy batsman. Underrated.
     
  5. Carbine Chaos

    Carbine Chaos Jubilant Masto

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Apr 09
    Posts:
    45,722
    Other Teams:
    Everton, Delhi, Perth
    The South African Gilchrist though? No.
     
  6. Van_Dyke

    Van_Dyke Brownlow Medallist

    Fremantle
    Joined:
    Jun 15
    Posts:
    19,585
    Location:
    Perth
    Other Teams:
    Chelsea, Glory, Warriors, NOLA,
    Tests
    Adam Gilchrist: Avg of 47.6, SR of 82
    Mark Boucher: Avg of 30.3, SR of 50.1

    ODI
    Adam Gilchrist: Avg of 35.9, SR of 96.94
    Mark Boucher: Avg of 28.6, SR of 84.76



    Basically the same thing :drunk:
     
  7. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    I was simply using him as another example of a successful aggressive batsman, aka a slogger. Maybe the Gilchrist comparison was too far.

    My point is he succeeded by belting bowlers.
     
  8. Dez!

    Dez! Brownlow Medallist

    Melbourne
    Joined:
    Jul 07
    Posts:
    29,213
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria
    Other Teams:
    Chicago Bulls
    You struggle to differentiate from aggressive batsman and slogger, they aren't the same thing.
     
    Matera92, Gethelred, Thomas2 and 5 others like this.
  9. PhatBoy

    PhatBoy Brownlow Medallist

    Geelong
    Joined:
    May 16
    Posts:
    14,481
    Bevan was toilet. He was a poor test batsman who couldn’t handle consistent short pitched bowling. He succeeded in one day cricket using impeccable running and gap-finding, and by holding his nerve.

    Gayle has been a successful test cricketer because he is a very good judge of his off stump and his technique while far from textbook, is sound.

    Sehwag played normal cricket shots. Adam Gilchrist played normal cricket shots. David Warner usually plays normal cricket shots and it is when he tries to slog balls that should be defended that he gets himself out.

    I don’t think you understand the difference between being aggressive and slogging.
     
  10. Plugger35

    Plugger35 The umpires are always right!

    St Kilda
    Joined:
    Sep 08
    Posts:
    89,993
    Other Teams:
    Chelsea, Black Caps, Subiaco
    Quinton de Kok would be a closer comparison to Gilchrist, Boucher was a good batsman but he wasn't capable of scoring at the rate Gilchrist could,
     
  11. Lensen

    Lensen You've ruined the act, GOB

    Collingwood
    Joined:
    Feb 03
    Posts:
    14,839
    Location:
    Brisbane
    Other Teams:
    Collingwood
    22yo trying to tell me Mick Bevan was a slogger. Ok mate
     

    (Log in to remove this ad.)

  12. Howard Littlejohn

    Howard Littlejohn Brownlow Medallist

    North Melbourne
    Joined:
    May 06
    Posts:
    12,958
    Location:
    Canberra
    Not the only way, but any batsman who cant adjust to conditions is not going to be a rounded Test player. The players you listed could do the hard yards and pull their stroke-making in when conditions required, with the exception of Gayle for most of his career; and often Warner thanks to having a Dutton-brain. That is the complaint with "sloggers", they are often nothing more; without at least one of technique or awareness to change their game when required.
    Bevan was a strange one. He could play the short ball at Shield level, when the bowling was just as fast and good as most Test sides. The short ball thing was real, but seemed to be a mental block. Certainly doesn't belong in the OP argument about successfully building Test innings.
    And yet in ODIs I think his reputation as a "finisher" overstates his actual worth. The miracle finish was sometimes required because he got bogged down in the middle overs and turned what had looked like easy wins into tight ones. He did stay around and do the job in the end, so it was rarely costly. Someone like Hussey was almost as strong in tight finishes, but also managed to take care of the easy ones without them becoming tight. Less dramatic, but more effective IMO.
     
    Gethelred, Kid A and Monstersnag87 like this.
  13. Kram

    Kram I'll brik u

    Fremantle
    Joined:
    May 07
    Posts:
    51,130
    Location:
    WA
    Other Teams:
    Chicago Bears, de Boer, Arsenal
    The bloke also loved to play for the red ink.
     
    dazza68 and PhatBoy like this.
  14. SherbertLemon

    SherbertLemon Premiership Player

    Essendon
    Joined:
    Apr 13
    Posts:
    3,624
    Sloggers are the worst
     
  15. Gough

    Gough Moderator

    Hawthorn
    Joined:
    Sep 06
    Posts:
    38,544
    I don't think you can compare anyone to Gilchrist, bloke was a freak.
     
    Gethelred and jumboprince like this.
  16. Hamingja

    Hamingja Norm Smith Medallist

    Geelong
    Joined:
    May 14
    Posts:
    8,419
    232 one dayers for 21 6's.

    Slogger extraordinaire right there.
     
  17. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    A slogger is a batsman who goes all out, correct?
     
  18. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    You are so wrong it's not even funny.
     
  19. Torz

    Torz Brownlow Medallist

    Fremantle
    Joined:
    Jun 11
    Posts:
    10,502
    Location:
    Perth
    I haven’t seen anyone complain that our test side is full of sloggers?

    The ODI and T20 sides, yes. Which I can understand, because we’ve selected a lot of one-pace batsman in recent times, who struggle to rebuild the innings once early wickets go down.
     
    Gethelred and Richard Pryor like this.
  20. SherbertLemon

    SherbertLemon Premiership Player

    Essendon
    Joined:
    Apr 13
    Posts:
    3,624
    In all seriousness, give me a good test batsman who can see off the new ball over all of them bar gilly.

    Having a wiki who can go the tonk gives the middle order a bit of spark, but I actually hate seeing a player like Warner in india or England on tough batting decks
     
  21. Dez!

    Dez! Brownlow Medallist

    Melbourne
    Joined:
    Jul 07
    Posts:
    29,213
    Location:
    Melbourne, Victoria
    Other Teams:
    Chicago Bulls
    Which is different from an aggressive batsman.
     
  22. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    How so? I thought they were two different ways of saying the same thing.

    Aggressive batsmen go after the bowlers

    Sloggers go after the bowlers.
     
  23. ShriekingShack

    ShriekingShack Senior List

    West Coast
    Joined:
    Jun 17
    Posts:
    181
    Doesn't mean he didn't try and hit them
     
  24. Richard Pryor

    Richard Pryor Norm Smith Medallist

    Hawthorn
    Joined:
    Feb 13
    Posts:
    5,129
    I think it depends on how you define slogger, if you define it as batting with all-out aggression trying to maximize scoring opportunities then yeah the OP makes sense, but if you define it as I think most would; trying to score boundaries off every ball while neglecting rotation of the strike, it does not.
     
    Dez! likes this.
  25. Richard Pryor

    Richard Pryor Norm Smith Medallist

    Hawthorn
    Joined:
    Feb 13
    Posts:
    5,129
    All deer have four legs bears have four legs bears are deer tier reasoning/trolling.
     
Back To Top

Share This Page