Tasmania set to apply for a provisional AFL licence (aiming to enter competition by 2025)

ash_1050

Club Legend
Nov 21, 2009
2,652
4,253
Melbourne
AFL Club
Essendon
Other Teams
Melbourne Victory and Arsenal
Big news out of Tassie this morning, possible application to enter the AFL with a standalone side in in 2025.


Tasmania looks certain to bid for a provisional AFL licence by the end of this year as one of a raft of recommendations that have emerged from the Hodgman Government-appointed task force.

In a significant step forward in the push for a stand-alone team, task force chairman Brett Godfrey told The Age that a provisional licence would demonstrate a degree of certainty to the state as it builds a strong business case for an AFL team with a potential 2025 entry into the national competition.


"A provisional licence would be contingent on certain things happening," said Godfrey, whose working party met in Hobart on Friday on the eve of Tasmania's last home-and-away game for the 2019 season.

"It would be subject to us submitting a compelling and sustainable business case that we can actually add value to the AFL and not simply existing to take from the pie.

"It doesn't mean when and it doesn't mean how but it does provide a good degree of certainty.

''Wouldn't a provisional licence be the logical next step?''

Godfrey, the founding chief executive of Virgin Australia who is now a key player in Tasmanian tourism, pointed out that the yet-to-be-established Tasmanian Devils VFL team has already been granted a provisional licence. The AFL granted Gold Coast a provisional licence in the years leading up to their AFL establishment in 2011 and there has not been a case where the granting of a provisional licence by the league hasn't led to a permanent place in the competition.

While the bold move would not guarantee Tasmania a stand-alone team it would underpin the resolve of the Hodgman Government as it moves towards shorter-term and potentially reshaped agreements with Hawthorn and North Melbourne.

It would also give the government and its highly motivated taskforce some certainty of Tasmania's place at the head of the queue for a potential next AFL club as the state gets behind the national bid.
In recent weeks Hawthorn president Jeff Kennett has again privately mooted walking away from a new deal with Tasmania should it forge ahead for a bid for its own AFL side.
The taskforce is due to present its findings to the Tasmanian Government in December but looks certain to demonstrate its belief that a stand-alone team could not only survive but thrive, potentially by 2025. In a separate development the AFL has been exploring extending the broadcast rights agreement by two years until the end of 2024.
In a series of developments in Tasmania it is understood:
*The taskforce is working towards the creation of a viable AFL team model with an annual turnover of $50 million.
*It will push to delay the launch of a second-tier state team until 2022 in a bid to better develop local talent, a move at odds with AFL Tasmania, which is working towards a 2021 deadline.
*Former St Kilda champion Nick Riewoldt has been charged with looking at potential player-retention issues in his firm belief Tasmania could be developed as a destination club.
*There is strong backing for the establishment of a new stadium and training facility at Hobart's Macquarie Point with home-and-away games divided between Launceston and Hobart.
*The taskforce could recommend the establishment of a board of directors to oversee the Tasmanian Devils - a name registered with the AFL, currently a fledgling under-age team competing in the NAB under 18s and run by AFL Tasmania.
*Potential new deals with Hawthorn and North would prioritise game development in the state.
The taskforce has already spent time in Queensland looking at the Brisbane Lions' successful academy model and plans to investigate in some depth the highly successful Geelong Football Club and its ascendancy over the past two decades under Brian Cook at GMHBA Stadium.
Riewoldt has emerged as a key mover within the taskforce and in the Tasmanian AFL bid. The recently retired St Kilda champion took part in Friday's task force talks and has been focusing on player retention.
Riewoldt, a native Tasmanian, has remained firm in his view that the potential 19th team could ultimately become a destination club. Brendon Bolton, who has temporarily retreated from the public eye since departing Carlton, is also working behind the scenes in the football development space.
The taskforce also includes former Woolworths chief Grant O'Brien, Football Tasmania director Julie Kay, former GWS executive Paul Eriksson, Dynamic Sports and Entertainment Group boss James Henderson and Launceston-based business leader Errol Stewart.

The view of the task force is that an annual turnover of $50 million would place the Tasmanian Devils as a middle-ranked AFL team, which would prove sustainable and not reliant over the long term upon head office hand-outs.
The preliminary findings of the Godfrey-chaired working group appear to have the cautious support of AFL chief Gillon McLachlan who in his first year at the helm of the competition declared a one-team model preferable for Tasmania.
The same cannot be said for Hawthorn, whose president last week described the "endless ongoing discussions" as "debilitating". In an open letter to Hawthorn members Kennett added that the research into the viability of a stand-alone Tasmanian team "takes everybody's focus off getting on with the issues we are charged to address".
But Hawthorn chief Justin Reeves told The Age: "We would love to see a team in Tassie and we also think this current model works really well."

Kennett and Reeves held talks with the task force in Launceston earlier this month and conveyed the message that they could move to depart Tasmania if the state pushed ahead with its bid for a stand-alone team. The Hawthorn view was that it could reap the same or a better financial result by playing more games at the MCG.
The five-year, $19 million deal expires at the end of 2021 and does not involve the financial incentives for winning finals and grand finals that led to an extra $1 million being paid by Tasmanian taxpayers to the Hawks during the previous agreement.
The prevailing view at grass-roots football level is that the Tasmanian Government should push both the Hawks and the Kangaroos to invest significantly more into game development in the state as part of any future agreement. Hawthorn and Tasmania are contracted to re-open negotiations in March next year.
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

Tasmanian saint

Team Captain
Apr 24, 2018
325
118
AFL Club
St Kilda
Heart: Would love to see a team in Tasmania. They have a rich history in our game.

Head: Seems barely feasible. Small market. Launceston people won't support a Hobart team and vice versa. Who is going to want to play and more importantly, stay there outside of locals? Sponsorship? Crowds?
Well seing as it’s effectively the Tasmanian state government that are the ones applying for the license I would say it would be far more financially viable and stable then gws and the suns will ever be the team would be based in Hobart and split home games between north and south it’s not rocket science 👍
 

(Log in to remove this ad.)

TheKITC

Club Legend
Mar 7, 2009
1,846
1,528
The Cupboard
AFL Club
Carlton
Well seing as it’s effectively the Tasmanian state government that are the ones applying for the license I would say it would be far more financially viable and stable then gws and the suns will ever be the team would be based in Hobart and split home games between north and south it’s not rocket science 👍
I take those points completely and think it's great that the government is backing it. Does that continue in perpetuity? I also have serious reservations about a team being based in Hobart being fully supported and embraced by those in the 'North' from my understanding of the local mechanisms and nuances of Tassie society/life.

Still think retention and attracting players will be a massive and on going challenge. Yes, it is one we've seen in the northern states, but they are bigger markets (why the AFL has and will continue to back them) and in more attractive locations. I personally think Tassie is lovely, but I would not want to live there and would probably need to be offered significant overs (like double+++) to move there for my career.
 

banzai

Club Legend
Oct 14, 2003
2,593
814
AFL Club
Richmond
Heart: Would love to see a team in Tasmania. They have a rich history in our game.

Head: Seems barely feasible. Small market. Launceston people won't support a Hobart team and vice versa. Who is going to want to play and more importantly, stay there outside of locals? Sponsorship? Crowds?
It didnt seem a problem when Hobart played a bigbash game in Launceston, they seemed to support the team fine then. They would obviously have to play games at both venues.
 

Blackhawk42

Premiership Player
Feb 5, 2018
3,276
5,280
AFL Club
Hawthorn
Other Teams
Chicago Blackhawks Melb Renegades
Pros:
A well deserved team in Tassie.

A sick name and logo.

19 teams means a bye every week BUT probably means it's easier to fixture Thursday night games, so Thursday night games every week.

Hawks getting the hell out of there meaning more games in Melbourne.

Seems like a confident business plan in that article.



Cons:
I'm sure there are a few, but the pros are absolutely winning. Let's make this happen!



732326



732327
 

caloschwaby

The One and Only
Jan 3, 2017
3,399
3,741
AFL Club
Collingwood
Other Teams
Celtics, Renegades, Packers
I'm all for it so long as they get rid of one of the pleb Victorian clubs.

Hard no otherwise
*cough* North Melbourne who already have an established women's team branded as Tasmania, play several senior games each year there and have a smaller membership-base relative to the rest of the Victorian teams *cough*
 

beta_condition

Norm Smith Medallist
Oct 14, 2011
9,598
13,304
AFL Club
Hawthorn
Just what the AFL needs another team.

They’re out of their ******* minds if they bring in a 19th.

The talent pool is shallow enough as it is.
Yep no doubt the expansion sides contributed to the drop off in scoring, Tazzie missed their chance for a side when the Gold Coast got a side.
 

Bowakawa

Major Leagues
Sep 8, 2010
3,275
2,754
3057
AFL Club
Essendon
Surely the team would be "Tasmania" and play home games in both Hobart and Launceston.
Would be successful as a 1 team state - 65% of Tassie's population are descendants of the first 10,000 people that settled there (obviously not including indigenous people) and Tasmania's population growth is more rapid than expected - they are on track to reach a population of 650k a decade earlier than what was forecast (2050) - the support and history has obviously always been there - I reckon it'd be a solid/reliable source of income for the league, not having to rely on on field success like in the expansion states.
 

Top Bottom