The Movie Thread

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Old Spice

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I'm putting this on this thread because the brilliance of it won't be seen on the Jordan Russell thread which is likely to sink like a stone.

We've made out like bandits in this trade period and the club has made the requisite kills to extend our dynasty. Been ruthless in a way that will set up the family for a long time. Never question the family again.


Apologies to TRS and other who have seen it already.
 

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Old Spice

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Scorsese ;)
If not for Marlon, Coppola's two biggest flicks would have been just another 2 epic hours of entertainment & slowly forgotten over time.
Bah, rubbish. I absolutely agree with you if you are saying Brando is perhaps the finest actor of the 20th century, but I'm not about to shit all over the Godfathers (I and II) and Apocalypse Now as though they weren't incredible movies when MB wasn't in the frame.

I love Goodfellas and decided one weekend to have a mafia bender. I had no pre-determind views, but after watching the Godfather, then Goodfellas, Copolla just killed it. Master of tension, space and time. Do it yourself, back-to-back, and tell me your view. Copolla is so far ahead as a director, it's not funny. Scorcese is magnificent, and I'm watching and addicted to Boardwalk Empire right now, but I tell you, Copolla is the master of cinema.
 

Palmer Stoat

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#7
Scorsese ;)
If not for Marlon, Coppola's two biggest flicks would have been just another 2 epic hours of entertainment & slowly forgotten over time.
I find many of Scorcese's films are impressive, but few lovable.

Suspect I'm swimming against the tide on this one, but Coppola for me too. Godfathers I & II, Apocalypse Now, The Conversation. He was on one of the hottest streaks in cinema history in the 70s.
 
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Old Spice

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I find many of Scorcese's films are impressive, but few lovable.

Suspect I'm swimming against the tide on this one, but Coppola for me too. Godfathers I & II, Apocalypse Now, The Conversation. He was on one of the hottest streaks in cinema history in the 70s.
The Conversation is brillaint. The man is an auter of the highest order. Gene Hackman and Harrison Ford are both great actors, but Copolla has a knack of creating something amazing in films.
 

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Quicky

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#14
I tell ya, i've been thinking about starting a cinema/movie thread for a while now. Always held out because I thought it would be filled with spoilers and devoid of quality discussion.

Apocalypse Now vs Platoon vs Full Metal Jacket vs Deer Hunter. Which is the greatest Vietnam war movie?
 

Vinnie Vegas

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#15
If Copolla isn't the greatest director of all time, I don't know who is.
*cough* Ahem *cough*



Coppola is amazing, and not just for The Godfather (and Part II), but also the lesser mentioned classics like Patton, The Conversation and Peggy Sue Got Married, but he also directed disastrous efforts like The Cotton Club, Jack and *gulps* The Godfather Part III *vomits uncontrollably*...

Hitchcock made 50 feature films over the course of 50+ years, and never once directed something as bad as The Godfather Part III, while being responsible for some of the greatest feats of cinema ever created, like North By Northwest, Rear Window, Vertigo, Dial M for Murder, The 39 Steps, To Catch a Thief, Strangers on a Train, Rope and Psycho.

Coppola is great, but there's really no argument to be made when it comes to discussing the greatest director of all time. Hitchcock is the Don Bradman/Wayne Gretzky of filmmaking - So far in front that nobody else even enters the discussion.
 
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Old Spice

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Hackman did Superman which forever tainted him as he Guy Sebastian of serious actors....
Not for me, I love Gene Hackman.

But the greatest was Marlon Brando, you can't go past him. I love Dustin Hoffman who brings conviction like few others, but there are few actors I find that I forget aren't the actors. Brad Pitt, Nicholas Cage, Geroge Clooney etc I always think of as the people they are, not the part they play. Kevin Spacey comes close, but not quite.

Watch Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire, The Wild Ones, On the Waterfront, The Godfather, that man is a genius. And they gave him the most shabby farewell, a fat, madman who ate hamburgers. A disgraceful farewell for the greatest.
 

Vinnie Vegas

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#18
I tell ya, i've been thinking about starting a cinema/movie thread for a while now. Always held out because I thought it would be filled with spoilers and devoid of quality discussion.

Apocalypse Now vs Platoon vs Full Metal Jacket vs Deer Hunter. Which is the greatest Vietnam war movie?
#1: Platoon
#2: Full Metal Jacket
#3: Deer Hunter
#4: Apocalypse Now

But yeah, this probably all belongs in a film thread...
 

lenny20

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#20
If Copolla isn't the greatest director of all time, I don't know who is.
No! It can't be Coppola because as amazingly good as his best films are, his bad films are hilariously bad!

Jack would have to be the worst film ever directed by an Oscar winner. And it's not like it's "bad" in that way where sometimes an award-winning director goes a little mental/experimental like Lars Von Trier in Melancholia, it's just a genuinely bad attempt at a feel-good Robin Williams movie. Youth Without Youth was also pretty crappy, and Bram Stoker's Dracula was pretty bad too if I'm being honest, but that was probably more Keanu's fault than anyone else's.

All this is said with the utmost respect to the excellent Apocalypse Now and the Godfather films, naturally.

Kubrick, Hitchcock, Scorcese, Tarantino and Spielberg all deserve mentions in the greatest director conversation for mine. And give Darren Aronofsky and Nicholas Winding-Refn a few more films each and they'll be talked about in the same light.

The things we talk about in the off-season.
 

footscore

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#21
But the greatest was Marlon Brando, you can't go past him.
nobody can, was definitely a one of a kind that's for sure.
You sound as though creativity at it's finest is a turn on (not the sexual-kind), you probably seen Last Tango in Paris?
Terrible, terrible film :thumbsdown:
but if you ever wanted to see a person put themselves through torment and humiliation while at the same time, manage to take their craft to yet another level of excellence....you should watch that one.
Haven't seen it for years now but he was quite brilliant from start to finish.
 

lenny20

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#23
I forgot to mention Paul Thomas Anderson. After The Master comes out at the end of the year I suspect we'll be hearing his name bandied around with the greats.
 
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Old Spice

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*cough* Ahem *cough*



Coppola is amazing, and not just for The Godfather (and Part II), but also the lesser mentioned classics like Patton, The Conversation and Peggy Sue Got Married, but he also directed disastrous efforts like The Cotton Club, Jack and *gulps* The Godfather Part III *vomits uncontrollably*...

Hitchcock made 50 feature films over the course of 50+ years, and never once directed something as bad as The Godfather Part III, while being responsible for some of the greatest feats of cinema ever created, like North By Northwest, Rear Window, Vertigo, Dial M for Murder, The 39 Steps, To Catch a Thief, Strangers on a Train, Rope and Psycho.

Coppola is great, but there's really no argument to be made when it comes to discussing the greatest director of all time. Hitchcock is the Don Bradman/Wayne Gretzky of filmmaking - So far in front that nobody else even enters the discussion.
There's volume, there's quality, and then there's brilliance. Hitchcock made a certain type of film, and he is brilliant, but I'd rate Apocalypse Now and the Godfathers I and II as films I'd much rather see.

We're a bit Anglo-Centric here in the conversation. I love Les Mepris by Jean Luc Goddard, it its perhaps one of my favourite movies despite the fact I had to read sub-titles. His mastery of the frame is unbelievable, so is Fellini or Bergman - who was the stylistic father of them all. Like De Chirico in motion.

On Quicky's question about the best Vietnam war film, I'll say and perhaps contradict myself by saying The Deer Hunter is the best.
 

Palmer Stoat

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#25
Not for me, I love Gene Hackman.

But the greatest was Marlon Brando, you can't go past him. I love Dustin Hoffman who brings conviction like few others, but there are few actors I find that I forget aren't the actors. Brad Pitt, Nicholas Cage, Geroge Clooney etc I always think of as the people they are, not the part they play. Kevin Spacey comes close, but not quite.

Watch Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire, The Wild Ones, On the Waterfront, The Godfather, that man is a genius. And they gave him the most shabby farewell, a fat, madman who ate hamburgers. A disgraceful farewell for the greatest.
I love Hackman too. But like any prolific actor, he does turn up in some crap every now and then.

I'm a Pacino man. His post-Scarface work has been patchy to say the least (what's with the shouting), but he was a god up until that point. For me, his performance in Godfather II rivals Peter O'Toole in Lawrence of Arabia as one of the greatest performances by an actor ever.
 
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