Preview giantroo's 2020 AFL National Draft thread.

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big lad skips

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Sep 2, 2020
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Hawthorn
I actually rate the kangas list. By the way sorry I'm a hawks supporter but I love ur vids giant. kangas have a solid list that I rate way better than hawthorns. hit the draft this year, don't get another tarryn Thomas. get Corr and williams and I think in a couple of years u should be good.
 

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Heaps of fun

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Sep 13, 2013
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I actually rate the kangas list. By the way sorry I'm a hawks supporter but I love ur vids giant. kangas have a solid list that I rate way better than hawthorns. hit the draft this year, don't get another tarryn Thomas. get Corr and williams and I think in a couple of years u should be good.
I think it's better than Hawthorn's list too.
 

Snake_Baker

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Forgot to mention we got the CBD too ... A place famous for it's number of young migrant and indigenous families ...
The AFL have retrospectively taken Les Foote & Wally Carter off us (both non indigenous & born in North), and given their playing records to Sydney.
 

shintemaster

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Yes I’m pretty sure a 9 year, $10m contract attracted a band 1 compo.

James Frawley deal is the one to be afraid of.
That was the deal where Melbourne were tanking and sh*t so the AFL decided to subsidise their coaching appointments and hand them picks for chuckles yeah?

Making a dumbed down version for the American market says everything you need to know about Americans.
I've just started watching this recently for the first time (iso desperation) after ignoring it as pointless. It has it's moments and improved once it stopped trying to mimic but yeah, it's completely superfluous when it comes down to it.
 
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Snake_Baker

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Just heard Logan McDonald on SportFM here in Perth. Speaks very well and came second for leading goal kicker with 21 from 8 games. IF Brown gets traded (nothing less than a 1st round pick), the McDonald becomes a priority for this draft.
We would trade Browny in the hope the crows don't take him first?

I reckon he's even money to end up with them.
 

big_e

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We would trade Browny in the hope the crows don't take him first?

I reckon he's even money to end up with them.
Would have thought McDonald suits Adelaide perfectly. Leading goal kicker is a 30 year old Taylor Walker, so he gets a year or two as second fiddle before being the man.

Incidentally, 21 goals in 8 games is what Lachie Hosie did in the SANFL last year.
 

briztoon

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It would appear to be the case as far as their underage years went.

Are you sure you interpreted the correct context?
Rowell won the medal for best on ground in the NAB League final, playing for the losing team, in his underage year.

His last few games in the NAB League and finals series, in his underage year, were better than Phillips underage year.
 

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Snake_Baker

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Would have thought McDonald suits Adelaide perfectly. Leading goal kicker is a 30 year old Taylor Walker, so he gets a year or two as second fiddle before being the man.

Incidentally, 21 goals in 8 games is what Lachie Hosie did in the SANFL last year.

Not to mention it's always bets to start with the talls in a major rebuild, and this draft can reap them 2 in the top 12.
 

The Filth Wizard

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It won't get too interesting for me unless this clickbait trade for Brown does happen.
I'm off the opinion still we very well might take McDonald even if we keep Brown. When this guy should be coming good he should be prime to replace/displace Brown (and if it's sooner Brown's endurance is a bonus playing up the ground, much like that year Matthew Richardson was in the Brownlow hunt).
 

giantroo

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AFL Draft 2020: Top 12 prospects from Vic Country

Who will be the AFL draft’s next Dustin Martin? A midfielder whose dad played for Richmond, the brother of a No.1 draft pick and a forward who booted 119 goals as an 11-year-old are among this year’s top Vic Country prospects. SEE THE FULL LIST.

Chris Cavanagh, Herald Sun

Subscriber only |September 16, 2020 10:16am
https://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/afl/moneyball-all-the-latest-afl-trade-news-and-whispers/news-story/ab6e56680ee294e9cb754be510e71aed

A big-bodied midfielder whose dad played for Richmond, the brother of a former No.1 draft pick, the brother of a Geelong rising star and an “AFL-ready” speedster likened to GWS star Zac Williams are among the top AFL Draft talent from country Victoria.

And did we mention the forward who kicked 119 goals in a season as an 11-year-old?

The state’s regions have a proud history of producing elite AFL talent from Luke Hodge to Dustin Martin and Sam Walsh. Who will be the next crop?

Here are the top 12 AFL draft prospects from Vic Country in 2020.

ELIJAH HOLLANDS (MURRAY BUSHRANGERS)


Midfielder/forward, 190cm, 84kg

The Bushrangers think Hollands is the most well-rounded player to come out of their system in at least seven years. He played primarily as a half-forward in the NAB League and in the Under-18 national championships for Vic Country last year, but had been expected to push into more of a big-bodied midfield role as a top-age talent this year.
A season-ending ACL injury at training in February scuttled those plans, but as it has turned out Hollands has not missed much given NAB League clubs and his school side Caulfield Grammar have not got on the park due to COVID-19 lockdowns in Victoria.
Hollands, whose father Ben played eight games for Richmond, played every game for Vic Country in last year’s national championships as a bottom-ager and is seen as an elite runner with serious top-end speed, a good decision maker and a player who is comfortable kicking on either side of his body. He was also unlucky not to win the best-on-ground medal in the Under-17s All Stars match at the MCG on AFL Grand Final day last year after logging 24 disposals, five clearances and two nice goals as captain of Team Brown.

TANNER BRUHN (GEELONG FALCONS)

Midfielder, 182cm, 75kg

Some recruiters believe Bruhn has “got the most class” of any small-medium size midfielder in this year’s draft. Bruhn played only two games late last season for the Falcons, having been sidelined for much of the year with knee problems. He had further minor knee surgery in February, which was to delay his start to this season. However, the COVID-19 shutdowns meant he has not missed any more football than anyone else in 2020.

From his two NAB League games last year, Bruhn had averaged 17 disposals (12 contested), five clearances, 115 SuperCoach points and kicked three goals. He also played four NAB League games in his under-16 year in 2018, becoming just the second player since Luke Hodge to play under-18s for the Falcons while still qualifying for under-16s. The under-18s call up that year came after Bruhn had been named Vic Country’s MVP at the under-16 national championships.

One recruiter has likened Bruhn to Richmond captain Trent Cotchin given his “twinkle toes” and attack on the ball. And his sporting talents go beyond football, having also been a member of Victoria’s under-17 cricket team.

ZACH REID (GIPPSLAND POWER)

Defender, 202cm, 82kg

Recruiters are “pretty comfortable” with where Reid sits in this year’s draft, many believing he is firmly in the top 12. A key defender, Reid measured 202.5cm during pre-season testing and while he thinks he has now stopped growing, he has managed to add about 4kg to his sizeable frame to now sit around 86kg. Reid models his game on Brisbane defender Harris Andrews and has settled and thrived down back after playing a variety of roles during his junior football days.

He hails from good bloodlines, with his grandfather Peter McRae having played two seasons with Footscray in the 1950s. Reid is considered good above his head, has a big leap and good endurance. He averaged 11.1 disposals, 3.9 marks, 4.1 intercept possessions and 2.1 spoils across 15 NAB League games as a bottom-age player for the Power last season.

OLIVER HENRY (GEELONG FALCONS)

Forward, 187cm, 77kg

The brother of Geelong defender Jack Henry, there’s plenty to like about the younger Henry who is firmly on the radar of recruiters. Henry played primarily as a forward in his bottom-age season for the Falcons last year and shone brightly. In just his third NAB League game, he booted 5.3 from 11 disposals and seven marks against Dandenong, and he kicked 4.2 among nine score involvements in his next appearance against Sydney.

Henry is athletic, has real speed and power, jumps at the footy and has strong hands. Recruiters also see him as a versatile player who could play a role in defence, with his flexibility another big plus.

Henry finished last season having played 15 games for the Falcons, averaging 10 disposals, 4.4 marks, 1.2 goals and 3.5 score involvements. One recruiter said he would just like to see a little more consistency from Henry, but others believe the upside is sizeable and that will come.


SEAMUS MITCHELL (BENDIGO PIONEERS)

Midfielder, 182cm, 72kg

A former GWS development coach, Pioneers coach Damien Truslove has had plenty to do with AFL talent and thinks Mitchell is more than capable of playing AFL football right now. Likened to Giants star Zac Williams, Mitchell has speed to burn, a beautiful kick and strong game sense. He played just five NAB League games for the Pioneers last year, but has shown enough for AFL clubs to be clamouring for his services.

Every AFL club has already interviewed Mitchell, who played as a half-forward last year but is seen as a player who could become a damaging half-back like Williams at AFL level with his pace and ability to break lines.

Hailing from Robinvale on the Murray River, Mitchell was kept out of the Pioneers’ practice matches earlier this year but would have been ready to go in Round 1. From his five NAB League games last season he averaged 10.6 disposals, 22.4 marks, 1.8 tackles, 1.2 goals and 63 SuperCoach points.

ZAVIER MAHER (MURRAY BUSHRANGERS)

Midfielder, 184cm, 82kg

Maher played only six games in the back half of the NAB League season for the Bushrangers last year, but did not go unnoticed playing school football for Caulfield Grammar. He won the best-and-fairest at Caulfield and is an inside midfielder with great power, speed and strength.

A slight knee niggle meant Maher had a limited pre-season this year, but he was able to play two games of under-18s football for Shepparton United in late July and early August — games which some AFL recruiters made the trip to watch, and they liked what they saw. A member of the Bushrangers’ leadership group in 2020, Maher averaged 10.5 disposals (6.3 contested), 3.2 clearances, three tackles and 65 SuperCoach points for the Bushrangers last season.

SAM BERRY (GIPPSLAND POWER)

Midfielder, 181cm, 81kg

As a 17-year-old last year, Berry could not have been much more impressive for Gippsland. He ranked as the equal-eighth rated bottom-age player in the NAB League in 2019, averaging 104 SuperCoach points across 10 games as a powerful inside midfielder.

Berry possesses strong endurance and work rate and rated above-average in the competition for contested possessions (9.8 a game) and elite for tackles (6.5 a game). He reads the ball well from a ruck situation, wins the hard ball and has clean hands at ground-level.

Berry lacks a little speed and his kicking needs a little bit of work, having recorded a below-average kicking efficiency of 48.5 per cent. However, recruiters remain very bullish about the Melbourne Grammar student’s prospects.

NICK STEVENS (GWV REBELS)

Defender, 191cm, 82kg

A medium-sized half-back flanker, Stevens has turned heads with plenty of draftable attributes. He’s a professional who is committed to his football and has good balance in his game of knowing when to attack and when to defend. Stevens is good above his head, has strong athletic traits including nice speed and makes good decisions with ball in hand.

A Geelong Grammar student who mixed his time between school football and NAB League last year, Stevens played six games for the Rebels averaging 14.3 disposals, 3.5 rebound 50s, two marks, five intercept possessions, 2.5 tackles and 72 SuperCoach points a game.

He played for Team Brown in the Under-17 All Stars game at the MCG on AFL Grand Final day last year and trained with Geelong over pre-season as part of the AFL Academy program.


JACK GINNIVAN (BENDIGO PIONEERS)

Midfielder/forward, 182cm, 76kg

AFL clubs have long tracked Ginnivan. It’s not every day an 11-year-old kicks 119 goals in a year of junior football, as Ginnivan did in 2014 with Newstead in the Maryborough Castlemaine District Football League. Ginnivan models his game on GWS forward Toby Greene and, while physically he still needs to put on some size, his goal sense, speed and agility is highly rated by recruiters. Versatility is also a strength for Ginnivan, who is seen as a player who could become a wingman, half-back or midfielder at AFL level after getting his fitness levels up to a high level.

Named a vice-captain of the Pioneers this year, Ginnivan played 12 NAB League games last season, averaging 16.1 disposals, 2.6 inside-50s, 3.4 marks, 1.6 goals and 94 SuperCoach points a game.

JOSH TREACY (BENDIGO PIONEERS)

Forward, 193cm, 92kg

A co-captain on the Pioneers this year, Treacy has been described as “brutal” in the way he attacks the ball in the air. The tough key forward is a power athlete with strong hands and a good kick who leads by example on the field.

Treacy spent a week training with Essendon over pre-season as part of the AFL Academy program and played for Team Brown in the Under-17 All Stars game on AFL Grand Final Day last year. Last season Treacy played 15 NAB League games, averaging 12.8 disposals, 4.1 marks, 4.4 score involvements, 0.9 goals and 90 SuperCoach points to rate as the second-best bottom-age key forward in the competition behind Elijah Hollands.

CHARLIE HAM (GEELONG FALCONS)

Defender, 181cm, 74kg

The brother of Essendon midfielder Brayden Ham, the Falcons’ flyer is a defender for now but is seen as being a player who could quickly evolve into a genuine midfielder or wingman at AFL level in the future.

Ham has a defend-first mindset but has exciting attributes and takes the game on when he wins the ball back. A classy left-footer, he can break the lines with his speed off the backline and took major strides forward with his development last summer.

A shining light for the Falcons in two practice matches earlier this year, Ham had looked set for a bumper 2020 before COVID-19 lockdowns forced the NAB League season to be scrapped. However, recruiters still like Ham after a promising bottom-age year that saw him play nine games for the Falcons and average 7.2 disposals at 76.9 per cent efficiency, 1.8 rebound 50s, 2.6 intercept possessions and 1.3 tackles.


HENRY WALSH (GEELONG FALCONS)

Ruckman, 202cm, 86kg

The brother of Carlton midfielder and 2018 No.1 draft pick Sam Walsh, the development of the Falcons ruckman over the past 18 months has been particularly impressive. Walsh played 13 NAB League games for the Falcons last season, holding down a role as the club’s No. 1 ruckman in his bottom-age season. He averaged 7.6 disposals, 27.3 hitouts (5.4 to advantage), 2.8 clearances, three tackles and 59 SuperCoach points, and had been expected to continue his rapid improvement this year before the season was abandoned.

Walsh trained with Carlton and his brother for a week over pre-season as part of the AFL Academy program and also played in the Under-17 All-Stars game at the MCG on AFL Grand Final Day last year. He is viewed as a player whose follow-up work around the contest is particularly strong and who has a good kick for a big guy. Given his size and potential at the next level, recruiters are confident he will be selected in this year’s draft as a developing project player.
 

giantroo

Bleeding Blue and White
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#3 Oliver Davis


It was interesting to watch Davis around the stoppages as he rarely had too much time and space, often tackled by multiple opponents. As Guilford Young’s captain, it hardly fazed him, firing out handballs from congestion to teammates on the outside and they benefited from his work. You know what to expect from the AFL Academy member, and he did just that. On a number of occasions he was able to hit up teammates inside 50, first to Lachlan Rowlands – who missed – then Lincoln Arnold – who goaled – but his best passage of play was an elite clearance to Holmes leading out in the last 90 seconds of the game to hand his full-forward back-to-back goals in the space of a minute. Occasionally he was done for doing a bit too much, caught close to the boundary line by Michael Stingel in the second term, and then went too high with the tackle on opposing captain Bailey Gillow in the last quarter, but the subsequent shot of the latter sprayed to the right.


Davis worked hard for 16 disposals – at 93 per cent efficiency – of which 10 were contested. He also had five clearances, three inside 50s and two tackles.

#10 Sam Banks

The Tasmanian Most Valuable Player (MVP) at last year’s Under 16s Championships, Banks brought his own ball to the game. While his second quarter was a little quiet, his first, third, and particularly fourth terms were very busy. When the game was on the line, he was continually involved, and his slick handballs or disposals to cut inboard and slice open the defence were handy. He uses the ball well and actually ran at 50 per cent contested rate, sharing his work in close as well as his preferred outside. He had a couple of chances at goal but could not quite register a major, and at one stage did a bit too much at half-forward and was brought down by Khai Lunson. Overall though, the positives stuck out for the major ball winner who had a day out through midfield and benefited from a high work rate across the field.


Banks amassed a game-high 34 disposals (73 per cent efficiency), 17 of which were contested, as well as six marks, six clearances and six inside 50s.


#21 Sam Collins

Did not see a lot of ball in the opening term because it was up the other end, but showed some good signs with a great tackle to save a charge on goal, then a long kick out of defence. That might have been turned over, but his kicking improved more in the second term, winning the ball more consistently. In the third term, Collins came across with a huge spoil at half-back to cleanly punch the ball out of bounds, backing up from an earlier tackle on the wing that forced a turnover. His intercept mark in the opening 30 seconds of the final term was also a highlight, whilst he finished strongly in the final term, using the ball well out of defence.


Collins finished with 20 disposals at 70 per cent efficiency, but nearly all were uncontested. He showed great determination with four one percenters, as well as six rebounds.
 

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