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Power and Privilege: Intersectionality in Australian Rules Football

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CrazyJoeFevola

Setanta Ó hAilpín’s official bigfooty butler 2007
Apr 14, 2013
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Is this your own work? There's some rubbish in it, particularly the criticisms around what women have to endure when compared with the men.

It might need some clarification on which Jason Ball it is too, it's not the AFL version but the suburban league variety. I had to google to check. Once I saw I remembered him.

Goodes wasn't booed because he performed a war dance, he was being booed a long time before that, his war dance was in response to the booing.
It’s always irked me how Ball (local 2s footballer not AFL premiership footballer) goes around promoting himself as the first out footballer at any level and isn’t questioned about it. I personally played with 3 players who were out to everyone they knew in the late 00s.

Basic research would also tell any journo worth their salt that though we haven’t had an ‘out’ gay man at the top level, Matt Burrows, a Liston Medallist for Preston in the VFA in the early 90s when it was still a decent, well covered comp, was out from very early in his career.
 

dumb

i s**t blue
Jul 12, 2008
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one way around this would be for the academy players to be offered pre-selection to victorian teams. the academy only serves to entrench insterstate players (and their progeny should they play 100 games) outside of the victorian football landscape.
 

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Shadow89

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Power, Privilege, and Intersectionality in Australian Rules Football

Australian Rules Football (AFL) is a popular sport that has a long and complex history in Australia. It is often seen as a symbol of Australian identity and culture, but it also reflects the social inequalities and power relations that shape Australian society. In this post, I will explore how intersectionality can help us understand the experiences and challenges of different groups of people who are involved in or affected by AFL.

Intersectionality is a term that was coined by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989 to describe how people’s lives are shaped by their identities, relationships, and social factors. These combine to create intersecting forms of privilege and oppression depending on a person’s context and existing power structures such as patriarchy, ableism, colonialism, imperialism, homophobia, and racism. Intersectionality is not just about adding up advantages and disadvantages, but about understanding how inequalities are dynamic, contextual, and shaped by power relations.

One example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of Indigenous players, who have made significant contributions to the sport but have also faced racism and discrimination. Indigenous players have been subjected to racial abuse, stereotyping, exclusion, and violence from fans, opponents, media, and even their own teammates. Some Indigenous players have used their platform to challenge racism and advocate for social justice, such as Adam Goodes, who was booed by crowds for performing a traditional war dance after scoring a goal in 2015. Goodes later retired from the sport after enduring years of harassment and vilification.

Another example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of women players, who have faced sexism and misogyny in a male-dominated sport. Women’s AFL was established in 2017 as a professional league, but women players still face barriers such as lower pay, fewer resources, less media coverage, and more scrutiny than male players. Women players have also been subjected to sexual harassment, objectification, and violence from fans, opponents, media, and even their own coaches. Some women players have used their platform to challenge sexism and promote gender equality, such as Tayla Harris, who was trolled online for a photo of her kicking a goal in 2019. Harris later became an icon for women’s empowerment and a role model for young girls.

A third example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of LGBTIQ+ players, who have faced homophobia and transphobia in a heteronormative sport. LGBTIQ+ players have been silenced, closeted, excluded, and bullied by fans, opponents, media, and even their own peers. Some LGBTIQ+ players have used their platform to challenge homophobia and transphobia and celebrate diversity, such as Jason Ball, who came out as gay in 2012 and became an ambassador for the Pride Cup initiative that promotes inclusion and acceptance in AFL.

The AFL was created to expand the game beyond Victoria and to address the financial and competitive challenges posed by other football codes, such as rugby league and soccer. However, many critics have argued that the AFL still favours Victorian clubs over non-Victorian clubs, and that there is a persistent Victorian bias in the league’s administration, media coverage, scheduling, umpiring and awards. Some examples of this alleged bias include:
  • The majority of AFL matches are played in Victoria, especially at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), which is also the venue for the grand final every year. This gives Victorian clubs more home games, more familiarity with the ground, and more revenue from gate receipts and memberships than non-Victorian clubs.
  • The majority of AFL executives, commissioners, umpires and media commentators are based in Victoria or have Victorian backgrounds. This may influence their decisions and opinions on matters affecting the league, such as rule changes, tribunal outcomes, draft concessions and All-Australian selections.
  • The majority of AFL fans and members are located in Victoria or support Victorian clubs. This may create a sense of parochialism and hostility towards non-Victorian clubs, especially when they challenge or defeat Victorian clubs in important matches.
These examples show how Victorians are privileged in the AFL, or at least perceived to be so by many non-Victorians. As Leigh Matthews, a Victorian who coached Brisbane to three consecutive premierships from 2001 to 2003, said: "Of course there is [a Victorian bias], the VFL became the AFL. It’s a Vic-centric competition. It’s like saying the sun is hot".

However, some Victorians may argue that their privilege is justified by their historical contribution to the game, their passion for the sport, and their success on the field. They may also point out that non-Victorian clubs have won more than half of the AFL premierships since 1990, and that some non-Victorian clubs have received special assistance from the league to survive and thrive.

The debate over Victorian privilege in the AFL is unlikely to be resolved anytime soon, as it reflects the different perspectives and interests of different stakeholders in the game. However, it is important to recognise that privilege exists in any social system, and that it can have positive and negative effects on individuals and groups.

These examples show how intersectionality can help us understand the power, privilege and justice issues that affect different groups of people in AFL. By applying an intersectional lens, we can recognise how experiences of multiple discrimination are not discrete, but mutually constituted and intersecting. We can also appreciate how some players use their agency and resilience to resist oppression and advocate for change. Intersectionality can help us imagine feminist solidarities in a globalised world that leave no one behind.

Hmmmm as an Honours sociology graduate who studied Crenshaw et. al at points, I need to point out a few flaws in your arguments here:

1. Perceived bias of Victorian AFL, has little or nothing to do with AFLW, LGBTQI, or Indigenous issues. Lumping these things together makes for poor argumentation and makes it near impossible for the reader to side with yout POV...given you haven't made a clear, consistent point throughout.

2. You've actually failed to really prove any Vic bias within this short essay. You've stated your opinions on things referencing what you consider to be intersectional issues/evidence, but have failed to argue how these things prove such a bias. Quoting one man who coached an interstate side at the time - who would also have an inherent bias at that time - , does not make for a strong argument.

3. You've failed to articulate why you've even posted this or what it is you're trying to achieve with such a post. Do you want to discuss intersectional issues that exist within the AFL/AFLW, or are you more concerned with the argument that the AFL is biased towards Victoria - either way you need to provide strong evidence if this is what you want to argue.

***********************

In summation, unfortunately this all comes across as just some diatribe written in haste, and with no clear consistent argument or structure. It sounds at the start like you're going somewhere, but ultimately you end up going nowhere. Intersectional doesn't mean issues that intersect with each other like you have presented them throughout. If you had argued that women being paid less and this factor being represented throughout the AFLW due to inequalities in gender leading to the comp being so far behind the men's comp in terms of time and investment - maybe that would of made for a more interesting argument. As it stands, however, it sounds like a whole lot of waffle that goes nowhere, and makes no point.

I sincerely hope this is Chat GPT, as otherwise, you've got a lot of work to do when it comes to presenting a structured essay that makes a consistent and convincing argument. Putting it on BF is also a strange thing to do as well, as this is not the place to be presenting essays, lol.

Zevon this is more your ball park, so let me know if I've missed anything in particular.
 

Zevon

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Hmmmm as an Honours sociology graduate who studied Crenshaw et. al at points, I need to point out a few flaws in your arguments here:

1. Perceived bias of Victorian AFL, has little or nothing to do with AFLW, LGBTQI, or Indigenous issues. Lumping these things together makes for poor argumentation and makes it near impossible for the reader to side with yout POV...given you haven't made a clear, consistent point throughout.

2. You've actually failed to really prove any Vic bias within this short essay. You've stated your opinions on things referencing what you consider to be intersectional issues/evidence, but have failed to argue how these things prove such a bias. Quoting one man who coached an interstate side at the time - who would also have an inherent bias at that time - , does not make for a strong argument.

3. You've failed to articulate why you've even posted this or what it is you're trying to achieve with such a post. Do you want to discuss intersectional issues that exist within the AFL/AFLW, or are you more concerned with the argument that the AFL is biased towards Victoria - either way you need to provide strong evidence if this is what you want to argue.

***********************

In summation, unfortunately this all comes across as just some diatribe written in haste, and with no clear consistent argument or structure. It sounds at the start like you're going somewhere, but ultimately you end up going nowhere. Intersectional doesn't mean issues that intersect with each other like you have presented them throughout. If you had argued that women being paid less and this factor being represented throughout the AFLW due to inequalities in gender leading to the comp being so far behind the men's comp in terms of time and investment - maybe that would of made for a more interesting argument. As it stands, however, it sounds like a whole lot of waffle that goes nowhere, and makes no point.

I sincerely hope this is Chat GPT, as otherwise, you've got a lot of work to do when it comes to presenting a structured essay that makes a consistent and convincing argument. Putting it on BF is also a strange thing to do as well, as this is not the place to be presenting essays, lol.

Zevon this is more your ball park, so let me know if I've missed anything in particular.
Nah you’ve hit the nail on the head. As essays go, it needs a fair bit of work (although it’s been a blissfully LONG time since I’ve written one mind you). Definitely reads like it’s written by ChatGPT with possibly a few little edits at most. The weird turn towards Victorian bias was odd as you said.

Like you I’m a little puzzled as to why it’s posted on BigFooty… but hey it doesn’t break any site rules so it can stay. I’m pleasantly surprised by the good folk of the main board for being relatively well behaved about it so far. Might put the thread on ‘watch’ though just in case :$
 

Always Ballin

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You have gathered 8 or 9 favourite Bigfooty topics and lumped them all in together. Interesting tactic.
It's all connected; this is what intersectionality teaches us. Here are some books that I recommend reading:
  • Women, Race, and Class by Angela Y. Davis
    • This book explores the history of black feminism and the intersections of race, gender and class.
  • Fighting Hislam by Susan Carland
    • This book examines how Western Muslim women fight sexism within their own traditions and communities.
  • Sex Workers Unite! A History of the Movement from Stonewall to Slutwalk by Melinda Chateauvert
    • This book tells the story of a movement of people who advocate for sex work as work and challenge the stigma and violence they face.
  • Sensuous Knowledge by Minna Salami
    • This book combines African philosophy, feminism and personal narrative to offer a new way of seeing the world that is inclusive and empowering.
I hope this helps you find some interesting and informative reads on intersectionality. 😊

The AFL, like other structures, preferentially benefits certain stakeholders; it offers power and therefore privilege to these groups. The concept of Victorian bias is well established; it fits in snuggly with race, gender, and sexuality in the AFL ecosystem. I'll finish with one of the best quotes of all time if you don't quite grasp this:

  • "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." - Martin Luther King
 
Last edited:

HalloweenJack

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Hmmmm as an Honours sociology graduate who studied Crenshaw et. al at points, I need to point out a few flaws in your arguments here:

1. Perceived bias of Victorian AFL, has little or nothing to do with AFLW, LGBTQI, or Indigenous issues. Lumping these things together makes for poor argumentation and makes it near impossible for the reader to side with yout POV...given you haven't made a clear, consistent point throughout.

2. You've actually failed to really prove any Vic bias within this short essay. You've stated your opinions on things referencing what you consider to be intersectional issues/evidence, but have failed to argue how these things prove such a bias. Quoting one man who coached an interstate side at the time - who would also have an inherent bias at that time - , does not make for a strong argument.

3. You've failed to articulate why you've even posted this or what it is you're trying to achieve with such a post. Do you want to discuss intersectional issues that exist within the AFL/AFLW, or are you more concerned with the argument that the AFL is biased towards Victoria - either way you need to provide strong evidence if this is what you want to argue.

***********************

In summation, unfortunately this all comes across as just some diatribe written in haste, and with no clear consistent argument or structure. It sounds at the start like you're going somewhere, but ultimately you end up going nowhere. Intersectional doesn't mean issues that intersect with each other like you have presented them throughout. If you had argued that women being paid less and this factor being represented throughout the AFLW due to inequalities in gender leading to the comp being so far behind the men's comp in terms of time and investment - maybe that would of made for a more interesting argument. As it stands, however, it sounds like a whole lot of waffle that goes nowhere, and makes no point.

I sincerely hope this is Chat GPT, as otherwise, you've got a lot of work to do when it comes to presenting a structured essay that makes a consistent and convincing argument. Putting it on BF is also a strange thing to do as well, as this is not the place to be presenting essays, lol.

Zevon this is more your ball park, so let me know if I've missed anything in particular.
Thanks for this. I thought when I read the thread that it was codswallop and now I know for sure.
 

VicBased

Club Legend
May 3, 2019
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Dude, Dude,Dude.....Way to many big words!
This is Big Footy, keep it under seven letter words.
 

Shadow89

Cancelled
Feb 20, 2018
17,150
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It's all connected; this is what intersectionality teaches us. Here are some books that I recommend reading:
  • Women, Race, and Classby Angela Y. Davis
    • This book explores the history of black feminism and the intersections of race, gender and class.
  • Fighting Hislamby Susan Carland
    • This book examines how Western Muslim women fight sexism within their own traditions and communities.
  • Sex Workers Unite! A History of the Movement from Stonewall to Slutwalkby Melinda Chateauvert
    • This book tells the story of a movement of people who advocate for sex work as work and challenge the stigma and violence they face.
  • Sensuous Knowledgeby Minna Salami
    • This book combines African philosophy, feminism and personal narrative to offer a new way of seeing the world that is inclusive and empowering.
I hope this helps you find some interesting and informative reads on intersectionality. 😊

The AFL, like other structures, preferentially benefits certain stakeholders; it offers power and therefore privilege to these groups. The concept of Victorian bias is well established; it fits in snuggly with race, gender, and sexuality in the AFL ecosystem. I'll finish with one of the best quotes of all time if you don't quite grasp this:

  • "Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere." - Martin Luther King

You are so far out of your depth here - take a break while you still have some dignity left, lol.
 

Choogler

Senior List
Nov 27, 2018
247
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Power, Privilege, and Intersectionality in Australian Rules Football

Australian Rules Football (AFL) is a popular sport that has a long and complex history in Australia. It is often seen as a symbol of Australian identity and culture, but it also reflects the social inequalities and power relations that shape Australian society. In this post, I will explore how intersectionality can help us understand the experiences and challenges of different groups of people who are involved in or affected by AFL.

Intersectionality is a term that was coined by Kimberlé Crenshaw in 1989 to describe how people’s lives are shaped by their identities, relationships, and social factors. These combine to create intersecting forms of privilege and oppression depending on a person’s context and existing power structures such as patriarchy, ableism, colonialism, imperialism, homophobia, and racism. Intersectionality is not just about adding up advantages and disadvantages, but about understanding how inequalities are dynamic, contextual, and shaped by power relations.

One example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of Indigenous players, who have made significant contributions to the sport but have also faced racism and discrimination. Indigenous players have been subjected to racial abuse, stereotyping, exclusion, and violence from fans, opponents, media, and even their own teammates. Some Indigenous players have used their platform to challenge racism and advocate for social justice, such as Adam Goodes, who was booed by crowds for performing a traditional war dance after scoring a goal in 2015. Goodes later retired from the sport after enduring years of harassment and vilification.

Another example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of women players, who have faced sexism and misogyny in a male-dominated sport. Women’s AFL was established in 2017 as a professional league, but women players still face barriers such as lower pay, fewer resources, less media coverage, and more scrutiny than male players. Women players have also been subjected to sexual harassment, objectification, and violence from fans, opponents, media, and even their own coaches. Some women players have used their platform to challenge sexism and promote gender equality, such as Tayla Harris, who was trolled online for a photo of her kicking a goal in 2019. Harris later became an icon for women’s empowerment and a role model for young girls.

A third example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of LGBTIQ+ players, who have faced homophobia and transphobia in a heteronormative sport. LGBTIQ+ players have been silenced, closeted, excluded, and bullied by fans, opponents, media, and even their own peers. Some LGBTIQ+ players have used their platform to challenge homophobia and transphobia and celebrate diversity, such as Jason Ball, who came out as gay in 2012 and became an ambassador for the Pride Cup initiative that promotes inclusion and acceptance in AFL.

The AFL was created to expand the game beyond Victoria and to address the financial and competitive challenges posed by other football codes, such as rugby league and soccer. However, many critics have argued that the AFL still favours Victorian clubs over non-Victorian clubs, and that there is a persistent Victorian bias in the league’s administration, media coverage, scheduling, umpiring and awards. Some examples of this alleged bias include:
  • The majority of AFL matches are played in Victoria, especially at the Melbourne Cricket Ground (MCG), which is also the venue for the grand final every year. This gives Victorian clubs more home games, more familiarity with the ground, and more revenue from gate receipts and memberships than non-Victorian clubs.
  • The majority of AFL executives, commissioners, umpires and media commentators are based in Victoria or have Victorian backgrounds. This may influence their decisions and opinions on matters affecting the league, such as rule changes, tribunal outcomes, draft concessions and All-Australian selections.
  • The majority of AFL fans and members are located in Victoria or support Victorian clubs. This may create a sense of parochialism and hostility towards non-Victorian clubs, especially when they challenge or defeat Victorian clubs in important matches.
These examples show how Victorians are privileged in the AFL, or at least perceived to be so by many non-Victorians. As Leigh Matthews, a Victorian who coached Brisbane to three consecutive premierships from 2001 to 2003, said: "Of course there is [a Victorian bias], the VFL became the AFL. It’s a Vic-centric competition. It’s like saying the sun is hot".

However, some Victorians may argue that their privilege is justified by their historical contribution to the game, their passion for the sport, and their success on the field. They may also point out that non-Victorian clubs have won more than half of the AFL premierships since 1990, and that some non-Victorian clubs have received special assistance from the league to survive and thrive.

The debate over Victorian privilege in the AFL is unlikely to be resolved anytime soon, as it reflects the different perspectives and interests of different stakeholders in the game. However, it is important to recognise that privilege exists in any social system, and that it can have positive and negative effects on individuals and groups.

These examples show how intersectionality can help us understand the power, privilege and justice issues that affect different groups of people in AFL. By applying an intersectional lens, we can recognise how experiences of multiple discrimination are not discrete, but mutually constituted and intersecting. We can also appreciate how some players use their agency and resilience to resist oppression and advocate for change. Intersectionality can help us imagine feminist solidarities in a globalised world that leave no one behind.
any suggestion that "some non-Victorian clubs have received special assistance from the league to survive and thrive" may have some truth to it, but the comment is somewhat ignorant and completely disingenuous by its failure to also recognise 2 things:

1. That interstate clubs bailed out the VFL and its clubs in 1986, when the VFL was technically bankrupt and on the verge of being shut down by the Victorian Corporate watchdog, who had previously warned against it (the VFL) and at least 7 of the clubs including Collingwood and Richmond of trading while insolvent. It was only the injection of the WCE and Brisbane Bears licence fees that persuaded the corporate watchdog not to do so.

2. It is also disingenuous to mention "assistance to interstate clubs" without revealing the other side of the coin, the unhealthy "thou shalt survive" mantra of the AFL towards Melbourne, StK, WB and NM all of whom would have folded, merged or relocated had they been made to pay their own way instead of being propped up through the AFL's "disequal distributions model. the attached shows how much those clubs would have lost between 2017 - 2020 without the propping up by the AFL.

Is the additional funding these clubs receive an example of this "Intersectional form of privilege"?


 

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jakson68

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I think the OP forgot about the 4th example of intersectionality.

The Ranga.

Lokk at what this terrible situation is doing to Clayton Oliver.

Please Doggie supporters, put your arms around Ed Richards before it is too late.
 

Blackhawk42

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Another example of intersectionality in AFL is the experience of women players, who have faced sexism and misogyny in a male-dominated sport. Women’s AFL was established in 2017 as a professional league, but women players still face barriers such as lower pay, fewer resources, less media coverage, and more scrutiny than male players. Women players have also been subjected to sexual harassment, objectification, and violence from fans, opponents, media, and even their own coaches. Some women players have used their platform to challenge sexism and promote gender equality, such as Tayla Harris, who was trolled online for a photo of her kicking a goal in 2019. Harris later became an icon for women’s empowerment and a role model for young girls.



Are you taking the piss with these bolded statements?
It's quite obvious why the women are and should be laid far less than the men (at this stage).
And the lower skill level is often ignored by commentators and media as not to draw criticism to the product. The men's AFL players and teams aren't afforded that luxury.
Likewise for AFLW players who don't present in elite condition. They aren't body shamed the same way the male players are or would be.

A lot of great buzz sentences but little nuance or critical thought put into a few parts of it.
 

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