News Swans Talk in the Media: 2021

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30JAN21: Brandon Jack article re: concussions New

SBD Gonzalez

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Kidding, right?

GoTheSwannies

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Reading the beginning of that article was a little strange, with BJ talking about being the hardest campaigner on the field, he was anything but. Edit: and I know he wasn't claiming to be, just a bit of cognitive dissonance with BJ and HC being used in the same sentence.

2 weeks off after being concussed would be good. I know we like to see the best players out there, but I think it's time to take the science of concussion seriously. Not sure how I feel about the rule being applied during finals, because that's a different beast altogether, but certainly during the H&A season, 2 week mandatory rest.
 

Bear31

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Very good piece by Brandon Jack about a hugely troubling issue:

He is refreshingly vivid in the way he describes his experiences and insights as a footballer. Whether you agree with him or not. I like his style as a writer. It's different. Things in his articles stick in your mind.
 

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JackSwans

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Very good piece by Brandon Jack about a hugely troubling issue:

Brandon Jack is such a refreshing writer, I've enjoyed a few articles he has written, he's not afraid to add his own experiences to make his point and he brings a personality into his style, something that I feel like is not common in modern journalism. It'll come with a lot of criticism but it will give readers like myself something to look forward to even if I disagree with the point he's making. Keep it up young man!
 

Bear31

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Brandon Jack is such a refreshing writer, I've enjoyed a few articles he has written, he's not afraid to add his own experiences to make his point and he brings a personality into his style, something that I feel like is not common in modern journalism. It'll come with a lot of criticism but it will give readers like myself something to look forward to even if I disagree with the point he's making. Keep it up young man!
I am liking you more as a poster. Keep posting!!
 

bungee

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Reading the beginning of that article was a little strange, with BJ talking about being the hardest campaigner on the field, he was anything but. Edit: and I know he wasn't claiming to be, just a bit of cognitive dissonance with BJ and HC being used in the same sentence.

2 weeks off after being concussed would be good. I know we like to see the best players out there, but I think it's time to take the science of concussion seriously. Not sure how I feel about the rule being applied during finals, because that's a different beast altogether, but certainly during the H&A season, 2 week mandatory rest.
I've little doubt that BJ went as hard as he could and played to the best of his ability. That he played only 28 games and struggled to make best 22 in the stongest Swans team for generations is hardly a reflection on his effort. Only a few players ever make it to the very top. I really enjoy reading his articles. He writes well and thoughtfully. This is a tough topic for football to address and by setting the issue within the context of a hyper-masculine culture he helps us to better understand it. Kudos for a great read and a very personal one.

My friend nursed Wade Chapman in hospital after one of his many concussions. Some fans on here will remember him as the unheralded hero of the dying moments of the 1996 prelim, whose long kick to the lead of our champion forward Plugger allowed him to mark on the very edge of a heavily defended 50m arc with just a second or two to play, before kicking that historical behind after the siren to take us into the GF. Chapman's bravery stood out even in a team with such heroes as Captain Courageous Kelly, Stuey Maxfield and Darren Cresswell, where the Bloods culture dictated that players go hard or go home. In those days scenes like Cresswell smashing his dislocated knee cap back into position on the boundary line were almost commonplace. The Swans brutal Bloods style of football, reborn under Kelly, instilled under Maxfield and cemented in place under Kirk, allowed for no other way of playing and we were both feared and respected for our ferocity and physicality at the contest.

My nurse friend told me they warned Chapman that he risked permanent brain damage with the way he played but he either ignored or made a conscious decision to accept the risks. It certainly wasn't his last concussion. Her comments first awoke me to the incredible risks these players took on our behalf. Brandon's comments remind us all. Players will continue to put themselves at risk, often because they know no other way and any other way is unacceptable in the AFL's culture. Some of us get annoyed at fans who seem to get off through knocking Swans players. Is it any wonder ? These are young guys who put their own health and their future health on the line week in, week out, purely for the sake of our team. Sure they get paid well for a short time but sometimes we need to be reminded of their sacrifices. In my view any player who pulls on the Swans jumper deserves our fans' respect. So too, perhaps, do players from other teams. I remember Nick Riewoldt running back with the flight and getting completely smashed to take an incredibly brave mark at the SCG one afternoon. He may have been an opposition player but I couldn't help but be impressed. It was a genuine highlight reel moment.

Clearly no player wants to shirk a contest, particularly in a culture where bravery is so applauded and instilled from the outset. The players get where they are because of their competitiveness. Brandon's diary entries remind us how hard they work to push aside self-preservation or rational fears of self-harm. In such a culture the AFL has an obligation to step up and step in to protect players from themselves. A lot has been done already to reduce head injuries but a lot more needs to be done. If that means our favourite players are forced to take a couple of weeks out, then so be it. We should not be prepared to ask any player to risk permanent brain damage purely for our entertainment.

Photo : Wade Chapman looks for options

1612101673234.png
 
Last edited:

Grand Uncle Horace

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I've little doubt that BJ went as hard as he could and played to the best of his ability. That he played only 28 games and struggled to make best 22 in the stongest Swans team for generations is hardly a reflection on his effort. Only a few players ever make it to the very top. I really enjoy reading his articles. He writes well and thoughtfully. This is a tough topic for football to address and by setting the issue within the context of a hyper-masculine culture he helps us to better understand it. Kudos for a great read and a very personal one.

My friend nursed Wade Chapman in hospital after one of his many concussions. Some fans on here will remember him as the unheralded hero of the dying moments of the 1996 prelim, whose long kick to the lead of our champion forward Plugger allowed him to mark on the very edge of a heavily defended 50m arc with just a second or two to play, before kicking that historical behind after the siren to take us into the GF. Chapman's bravery stood out even in a team with such heroes as Captain Courageous Kelly, Stuey Maxfield and Darren Cresswell, where the Bloods culture dictated that players go hard or go home. In those days scenes like Cresswell smashing his dislocated knee cap back into position on the boundary line were almost commonplace. The Swans brutal Bloods style of football, reborn under Kelly, instilled under Maxfield and cemented in place under Kirk, allowed for no other way of playing and we were both feared and respected for our ferocity and physicality at the contest.

My nurse friend told me they warned Chapman that he risked permanent brain damage with the way he played but he either ignored or made a conscious decision to accept the risks. It certainly wasn't his last time concussion. Her comments first awoke me to the incredible risks these players took on our behalf. Brandon's comments remind us all. Players will continue to put themselves at risk, often because they know no other way and any other way is unacceptable in the AFL's culture. Some of us get annoyed at fans who seem to get off through knocking Swans players. Is it any wonder ? These are young guys who put their own health and their future health on the line week in, week out, purely for the sake of our team. Sure they get paid well for a short time but sometimes we need to be reminded of their sacrifices. In my view any player who pulls on the Swans jumper deserves our fans' respect. So too, perhaps, do players from other teams. I remember Nick Riewoldt running back with the flight and getting completely smashed to take an incredibly brave mark at the SCG one afternoon. He may have been an opposition player but I couldn't help but be impressed. It was a genuine highlight reel moment.

Clearly no player wants to shirk a contest, particularly in a culture where bravery is so applauded and instilled from the outset. The players get where they are because of their competitiveness. Brandon's diary entries remind us how hard they work to push aside self-preservation or rational fears of self-harm. In such a culture the AFL has an obligation to step up and step in to protect players from themselves. A lot has been done already to reduce head injuries but a lot more needs to be done. If that means our favourite players are forced to take a couple of weeks out so be it. We should not be prepared to ask any player to risk permanent brain damage purely for our entertainment.

Photo : Wade Chapman looks for options

View attachment 1048981
I remember Wade Chapman very well. Ports Butters and the Brions Berry kids along with Mills and several of our young players have the same crazy brave attitude of a lightly built Chapman.
 

bedford

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I've little doubt that BJ went as hard as he could and played to the best of his ability. That he played only 28 games and struggled to make best 22 in the stongest Swans team for generations is hardly a reflection on his effort. Only a few players ever make it to the very top. I really enjoy reading his articles. He writes well and thoughtfully. This is a tough topic for football to address and by setting the issue within the context of a hyper-masculine culture he helps us to better understand it. Kudos for a great read and a very personal one.

My friend nursed Wade Chapman in hospital after one of his many concussions. Some fans on here will remember him as the unheralded hero of the dying moments of the 1996 prelim, whose long kick to the lead of our champion forward Plugger allowed him to mark on the very edge of a heavily defended 50m arc with just a second or two to play, before kicking that historical behind after the siren to take us into the GF. Chapman's bravery stood out even in a team with such heroes as Captain Courageous Kelly, Stuey Maxfield and Darren Cresswell, where the Bloods culture dictated that players go hard or go home. In those days scenes like Cresswell smashing his dislocated knee cap back into position on the boundary line were almost commonplace. The Swans brutal Bloods style of football, reborn under Kelly, instilled under Maxfield and cemented in place under Kirk, allowed for no other way of playing and we were both feared and respected for our ferocity and physicality at the contest.

My nurse friend told me they warned Chapman that he risked permanent brain damage with the way he played but he either ignored or made a conscious decision to accept the risks. It certainly wasn't his last time concussion. Her comments first awoke me to the incredible risks these players took on our behalf. Brandon's comments remind us all. Players will continue to put themselves at risk, often because they know no other way and any other way is unacceptable in the AFL's culture. Some of us get annoyed at fans who seem to get off through knocking Swans players. Is it any wonder ? These are young guys who put their own health and their future health on the line week in, week out, purely for the sake of our team. Sure they get paid well for a short time but sometimes we need to be reminded of their sacrifices. In my view any player who pulls on the Swans jumper deserves our fans' respect. So too, perhaps, do players from other teams. I remember Nick Riewoldt running back with the flight and getting completely smashed to take an incredibly brave mark at the SCG one afternoon. He may have been an opposition player but I couldn't help but be impressed. It was a genuine highlight reel moment.

Clearly no player wants to shirk a contest, particularly in a culture where bravery is so applauded and instilled from the outset. The players get where they are because of their competitiveness. Brandon's diary entries remind us how hard they work to push aside self-preservation or rational fears of self-harm. In such a culture the AFL has an obligation to step up and step in to protect players from themselves. A lot has been done already to reduce head injuries but a lot more needs to be done. If that means our favourite players are forced to take a couple of weeks out so be it. We should not be prepared to ask any player to risk permanent brain damage purely for our entertainment.

Photo : Wade Chapman looks for options

View attachment 1048981
Wade was so underated
 
1FEB21: Heeney Surgery New

hairy biker

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Isaac Heeney hopeful of playing round 1.

Also underwent stem cell treatment to help restore the cartilage he had removed as part of the initial operation.
 
1FEB21: Franklin update New

SwansProudly

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Isaac Heeney hopeful of playing round 1.

Also underwent stem cell treatment to help restore the cartilage he had removed as part of the initial operation.
Isaac with Lance most unlikely. to play round 1.
Neither can be rushed back
 

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hairy biker

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Wade was so underated
I think he was one of those guys universally admired by supporters, not only because of the absolutely fearless way he went about it but also because he represents the 'everyman' player, that supporters can identify with.
When we have one of those 'favourite players' threads he always features prominently alongside the other more obvious candidates (eg Goodes, Kelly etc).
 

Tedeski

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Tedeski

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By the sounds of it his body is done
A sad reality for us all Punts I'm afraid. Time for the club to rip the bandaid off.
The guy is 34. Dermie retired at 31 & played crippled for his last 3 or 4 years, including as a Swan.
 

Angry Red Bull

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Buddy won't play any significant AFL footy ever again.
The club is playing with fans on the Buddy front. It is just a 'show' having him run around for the rest of his contract to take the heat of the last few years of his contract.

"minor setback" my arse!
Described as tightness in his calf mid training session and 1 week set back. Otherwise they have been very happy with his regime and conditioning. I don’t think fans are getting run around and I still think he has a role to play but it’s probably going to be managed here on. Will be interesting to see what role they put him in.
 

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