Society/Culture What are parents doing these days to help their child’s cognitive development?

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Seeds

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I don't think that's accurate. Mental health issues among teens is rising at a rate that can't be explained only by more recognition or diagnosis.
Do you have anything to back that up?

Bullying and violence was just part of going to school in the past and no one spoke up. Its not anymore. Bullies are now called out and ostracised. Nerd culture is now a thing. School seems to be a much more enjoyable place these days.
 

ShanDog

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Do you have anything to back that up?

Bullying and violence was just part of going to school in the past and no one spoke up. Its not anymore. Bullies are now called out and ostracised. Nerd culture is now a thing. School seems to be a much more enjoyable place these days.
Yes, when the rates of hospitalisation for self harm are rising by percentages in the hundreds over the last 8 years, that's not increased awareness. That's increased issues.

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ShanDog

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Bullies are now called out and ostracised. Nerd culture is now a thing. School seems to be a much more enjoyable place these days.
I think you may have a distorted view of what school is like based on your experience. It's likely much better in some areas, but in others, it's still very bad. Throw social media into the mix and it's a perfect storm for bullying, harrassment unacceptable behaviour etc. I see it all the time where I work.
 

utility

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Books are great! Feck kindles and that crap. I'd rather my kids pick a book off the shelf than run to a device. They'll use them more as they get older but at least have the habit of reaching for a book.

I discovered op shop books about 18 months ago. If you know where to look you can buy great kids books for 2-3 for a dollar. My kids have hundreds of books and read every day. Fiction, non-fiction, picture books, chapter books, different languages, bilingual books, some great stuff. When my son asks me science-related questions that I can't answer I can point to some books and either read them with him or let him learn independently. Then we jump onto YT and watch videos together.
 

ShanDog

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Books are great! Feck kindles and that crap. I'd rather my kids pick a book off the shelf than run to a device. They'll use them more as they get older but at least have the habit of reaching for a book.

I discovered op shop books about 18 months ago. If you know where to look you can buy great kids books for 2-3 for a dollar. My kids have hundreds of books and read every day. Fiction, non-fiction, picture books, chapter books, different languages, bilingual books, some great stuff. When my son asks me science-related questions that I can't answer I can point to some books and either read them with him or let him learn independently. Then we jump onto YT and watch videos together.
There's not much better you can do to encourage and foster your children's reading and learning than this. Great stuff.
 

Suspense

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In defense of Kindles, they have excellent accessibility options - particularly for students that are dyslexic, low vision or just have trouble focusing on small text/bad fonts/minimal line spacing.

Enhanced Typesetting and Reading Customization

They also have useful built-in dictionary and translation features which can assist all students when reading texts - but particularly those from non-english speaking backgrounds.

Look Up Words, People, and Places While You Read
 
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RookiePick

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I think you may have a distorted view of what school is like based on your experience. It's likely much better in some areas, but in others, it's still very bad. Throw social media into the mix and it's a perfect storm for bullying, harrassment unacceptable behaviour etc. I see it all the time where I work.
There is a lot of lip service to anti-bullying policies in my experience (4 x primary aged children) but when issues arise the policies are used as a shield to avoid having to deal with the issue at hand eg. we have anti-bullying policies therefore bullying cannot be occuring.

It's no surprise to me that teaching and administration staff don't want to see it when they have very effectively had their hands tied behind their backs around discipline.
 

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Pessimistic

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Is it still common for parents to read to their kids? Teach them to read? Learn basic numeracy? Encourage playing with other kids in interactive environments?

I’m a high school teacher and I’ve never been more terrified about how incapable students are coming into high school. A huge percentage can’t read or write. They have no ability to focus for more than a minute. The mental health and behavioural issues are destructive and widespread.

What is happening at home?
Heres the thing. Those kids are the future not us. They are prepared for It better than we would be.

That future may not be ideal, but it is what it is.
 

Pessimistic

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I recently asked my mum about some primary aged kids over in my street that never seem to be at school. She works there so was able to look up their attendance this year, since May four kids with 12%, 6%, 2% and 0%. How is this allowed to happen? Both sets of parents don't work, Centrelink payments should be looked at if you can't get your kids to school at least 80% ofthe time.
So much wronqg
 

skilts

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Interesting that this thread has enjoyed a revival. In my not so humble opinion, there is nothing more important in life than education.

My son is now aged thirty-nine, well past primary or secondary school. as he should be. When he was eighteen, he told me, "Dad, I'm not going to be an academic." Over the next fifteen years he studied at the BBC, RMIT and Edith Cowan in WA. He certainly didn't become an academic, but one of the best-qualified sound engineers in the country. His current skills include the creation and maintenance of the ARC for the AFL, and the management of the operation of outside broadcast vans for televising of sporting events.

During the first three and-a-half-years of his life, I was his principle caregiver. I like to think this has provided us with a special relationship, not usually available to fathers.

During those first three and-a half years, I would invariably read a book with him every night. Until. one night, he said he'd rather hear stories from me about my life. I overcame my initial embarrassment and did as he asked, until he was six years-old. Luckily, being a person who had actively and avidly explored interesting people and the situations in which I and they found ourselves, there was no shortage of material.

The upshot of this is that he now has a splendid vocabulary and is more than proficient in pronunciation. His command of syntax sometimes fails him though. He still emails me important documents he wants to send, for me to edit and comment on, which is a buzz for me.

His friends from primary and secondary schools, who still meet us on a regular basis, tend to regale me with the favours he has done them and what a fine human he is. I see no reason to disagree with any of this. Mind you, I attribute a lot of this to his mum who had (agreed) custody of him from the time he was six. I had him over to my joint on weekends. Every woman with whom I've ever had a serious relationship had one outstanding characteristic - integrity - you can't buy it.
 
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Seeds

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Interesting that this thread has enjoyed a revival. In my not so humble opinion, there is nothing more important in life than education.

My son is now aged thirty-nine, well past primary or secondary school. as he should be. When he was eighteen, he told me, "Dad, I'm not going to be an academic." Over the next fifteen years he studied at the BBC, RMIT and Edith Cowan in WA. He certainly didn't become an academic, but one of the best-qualified sound engineers in the country. His current skills include the creation and maintenance of the ARC for the AFL, and the management of the operation of outside broadcast vans for televising of sporting events.

During the first three and-a-half-years of his life, I was his principle caregiver. I like to think this has provided us with a special relationship, not usually available to fathers.

During those first three and-a half years, I would invariably read a book with him every night. Until. one night, he said he'd rather hear stories from me about my life. I overcame my initial embarrassment and did as he asked, until he was six years-old. Luckily, being a person who had actively and avidly explored interesting people and the situations in which I and they found ourselves, there was no shortage of material.

The upshot of this is that he now has a splendid vocabulary and is more than proficient in pronunciation. His command of syntax sometimes fails him though. He still emails me important documents he wants to send, for me to edit and comment on, which is a buzz for me.

His friends from primary and secondary schools, who still meet us on a regular basis, tend to regale me with the favours he has done them and what a fine human he is. I see no reason to disagree with any of this. Mind you, I attribute a lot of this to his mum who had (agreed) custody of him from the time he was six. I had him over to my joint on weekends. Every woman with whom I've ever had a serious relationship had one outstanding characteristic - integrity - you can't buy it.
Perhaps focus a little less on vocabulary and syntax and a little more on structure and coherrance. You started off on education but then wandered and somehow finished up on integrity without in the end making any real argument on why education was important (nor why integrity is either for that matter). What was the point you were trying to get across?
 

Seeds

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Books are great! Feck kindles and that crap. I'd rather my kids pick a book off the shelf than run to a device. They'll use them more as they get older but at least have the habit of reaching for a book.

I discovered op shop books about 18 months ago. If you know where to look you can buy great kids books for 2-3 for a dollar. My kids have hundreds of books and read every day. Fiction, non-fiction, picture books, chapter books, different languages, bilingual books, some great stuff. When my son asks me science-related questions that I can't answer I can point to some books and either read them with him or let him learn independently. Then we jump onto YT and watch videos together.
Books are useless as a learning tool compared to kindles. With kindles you can take notes with one click of a button And easily come back to them. You can’t do that with books. Books also create posture problems more so then kindles. Books also get damaged where a kindle book is stored on a cloud for eternity. Books take up too much space in your house. Books require trees to be cut down. Books are bad for your vision when reading in low light at night. Books cost a lot more. you have to waste time going to the shops to get books. books suck compared to kindles.
 

Chief

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Perhaps focus a little less on vocabulary and syntax and a little more on structure and coherrance. You started off on education but then wandered and somehow finished up on integrity without in the end making any real argument on why education was important (nor why integrity is either for that matter). What was the point you were trying to get across?
Maybe we just all enjoyed the story?
 

skilts

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Perhaps focus a little less on vocabulary and syntax and a little more on structure and coherrance. You started off on education but then wandered and somehow finished up on integrity without in the end making any real argument on why education was important (nor why integrity is either for that matter). What was the point you were trying to get across?
I, obviously mistakenly, thought that the value of education and of integrity would be self-evident. It would seem that this is not so in your case. I profoundly apologise for not writing that which you would have preferred.
 

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